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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY 
AT URBANAtfHAMEAlfiN 




Copyright © 1995 Illio 

published annually by the illini media company 

All Rights Reserved 




able of Contents 

Opening 2 

Student Life 8 

Academics 104 

Sports 152 

Greeks & Organizations ... 232 

Graduates 360 

Advertisements 422 

Index 432 

Closing 458 



DEGREES OF 






Illio 1995 

Volume 102 

University of Illinois 

Illini Media Company 

57 East Green Street 

Champaign, Illinois 61820 







Publisher 

Jim McKellar 

Editors in Chief 

Ryan Almon 

Peggy Christensen 






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attend college, we will encounter many 



events that will affect our lives in one way or another. 




Through these encounters will come change - change in our personalities, in our lifestyles and in our attitudes. A college 



education helps to prepare us for the many changes that will take place in our lifetime. The professors at the U of I tell 




us of the changes that occurred in the past, but, in order for the world to 



improve, we must continue to make changes that will affect the future. We 



need to make changes in order to improve the bad qualities of life and enhance the good ones, gs It is obvious that 



there is a certain degree of change that must be made. But the question that remains is what degree of change is 



appropriate in the many different siutations that we will encounter in our 



lifetime? During the 1994-1995 school year, students on this campus as 



well as people around the world were faced with many opportunities to 




make changes in their own lives as well as in others'. These changes affected all of our lives in a variety of ways. 





As President Stanley Ikenberry announced his departure from the Univer- 



sity of Illinois, students prepared themselves for the future changes in the 



administration. Although it was not a drastic change, most students felt 



the effects that come with new leadership. Another major change that affected every student on campus was the new 



wave of technology that swept through the university and brought with it on-line 



registration. Those days of standing in endless lines at the Armory were finally gone 



forever. The degree of change of passing from the infamous on-campus registration at 



the Armory to U of I Direct was a slow one, since the U of I is one of the final schools 




in the Big Ten to impliment this type of system. During the 1994-1995 school year, construction on campus 




drastically changed the look of the University of Illinois campus. The 



Engineering Quad started to take shape as buildings were torn down and 



parking spaces eliminated to make room for an enclosed grassy Quad. 



Also, new buildings were erected across campus. One of the most recognizable changes on campus was the addition 



DEGREES OF 





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of the Courtyard Cafe in the Illini Union. Although Illinois' hopes for a Big Ten Football Championship were 



dashed this year, the team still found themselves in a post-season bowl 



game. The Illini travelled to Memphis, Tenn., for the Liberty Bowl and — 




found themselves in an unusual situation - they reigned victorious in a bowl game. On a more radical note, the 




world witnessed the rebirth of South Africa when Nelson Mandela was elected 



president by all of the citizens - both black and white. This was a dramatic degree of 



change as the barriers of racism showed signs of breaking down, o© Nationally, one 



of the most shocking degrees of change was the election of a Republican Congress for 



the first time in more than 40 years. Also, media coverage changed drastically as the trial of O.J. Simpson overtook the 



nation with the daily media updates and televised courtroom coverage. 



Each one of these changes, along with scores of others, took place 




during the 1994-1995 school year and impacted all of our lives to some degree. The Illio attempts to cover many of 



these changes in order to help us come a little closer to understanding exactly what Degrees of Change must be made. 




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ou can't stay in one place, gotta move with the times "cause the 

times, they are a-changin'." When Bob Dylan sang these 

words, U of I students were demonstrating their reactions to 

the war in Vietnam and voicing their opinions on civil rights. 

The Quad was trampled by these concerned students standing up 

for their beliefs. 

A quarter of a century seemed to make little difference to the Quad. Only the issues 

had changed; this year saw demonstrations for the rights and respect of different 

cultural groups, religious groups and the homosexual community. Still a lot of crowds 

around speakers with megaphones - some things never change, right? 

Actually, nothing could be further from the truth. The university campus has long 
been the setting for awakening societal awareness, heightening the students' sensitivity 
to difficult problems facing the world today. The educational institution provides a 
forum for bridging the gaps of misunderstanding between people of different 
backgrounds. From the university setting emerge enlightened young men and women, 
ready to tackle and solve the problems of the "real world." 

All right, not so fast. And not so easy. Change is not a "quick fix" - it is a process. 
It is a gradual process, and not necessarily such a happy, shiny one. So it comes 
in small steps, as students and community members continually learn about and 
adapt to their environment. 

Some of these changes seem highly significant, while the importance of others may 
not be recognized at all. Yet they all have potential. The increasing appreciation of local 
bands may bring about national success of a new sound. Higher enrollment in kung fu 
may spur on the popularity of this martial art's deeper philosophy. Perhaps a new 
student parking system may set an example toward the elimination of parking tickets 
across the country. 

Well, maybe that last one is stretching it a bit. Nonetheless, the potential for change 
is in everyone, and students on the U of I campus have the opportunity to work toward 
the manifestation of those changes. They take advantage of that opportunity every day 
by expressing their beliefs, voicing their opinions and supporting each other. This is 
what it means to work for degrees of changes. 



DEGREES OF 





VlDA RlSKUS 

Student Life Editor 



Hoi» 



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I/fin! Fr'\do 



°ind 



For the 1994 homecoming, "Homeward Bound" meant breaking away 
from the norm. As a part of this spirit, different cultures joined in with then- 
own definitions of homecoming. 

Saturday, Oct. 1 was a big night for African- Americans to make their mark 
on the festivities. Godfrey Danchimah, a comedian who performed with Jim 
Carrey and Sinbad, performed his routine in Lincoln Hall that evening. Not 
only did Danchimah provide entertainment for the crowd, but his act served 
as warm-up for the "Body and Soul" Homecoming Dance. 

Although the organization had separate functions, it made an effort to be 
close to the pulse of the spirit. "We have some activities outside the mainstream. 
We don't do what everyone else does. We actually get to know the [football] 
players closer. We're closer to the pace of the game than a lot of students think 
they are," said Dwayne Smith, senior in LAS. 

Parade traditions had to make way for change. President Stanley Ikenberry 
and his wife, Judith, rode in the parade for the first time. Waving from a 
vintage car, they were also bidding farewell to a traditional presidential post 
that Ikenberry truly made his own. 

Another change within the parade format was the invitation to the Areola 
high school band as guests. In the past, high school bands served as the butt 
of college students' jokes. This year's Areola representatives marched to the 
end of a five year absence of a high school band appearances. They played 
assured of security from a parade committee who guarded against possible 
harassment from spectators. 

"A few years ago, a high school band was harassed by college students. This 
year, to prevent that, parents and parade committee members walked alongside 
the band," said Matt Dirks, a junior in LAS. 

These novelties stood out against a background of annual festivity traditions. 
"Homeward Bound" also signaled the return call to alumni such as Nada 
Rowand, an actress featured on "Loving" since 1983; Kenn Allen, senior 
consultant for the Points of Light Foundation and former assistant dean of 
student programs; and Steven Gerdes, a Harvard law degree recipient who 
scored a 99.9 percent on his LSAT. The U of I welcomed them with what they 
hoped would be the traditional atmosphere of good old university life. 

"Homecoming is an opportunity to bring back nostalgic feelings for the 
alumni. We play the school songs when the time comes. We just try to make 
sure it maintains its original flavor," said Gary Smith, director of the Marching 
Iliini. 

The Marching Iliini fulfilled their ambitions at the parade and pep rallies on 
Friday night and the football game on Saturday afternoon. Members 

(story continued on page 12) 




President Stanley Ikenberry and 
wife, Judith, join newly-crowned 
Homecoming King Briant Kelly, 
senior in Engineering, and Queen 
Gretchen Jokisch, senior in 
Agriculture, in the singing of the 
Alma Mater. 



Briant Kelly and Gretchen Jokisch 
hug after being named King and 
Queen atthepep rally on the Quad 
the night before the Homecoming 
game. Lou Tepper spoke to fans 
during the pep rally. 



10 Student Life 




Bob 
Green, 
senior in 
LAS, 

cheers for 
the Mini 
at the 
Home- 
coming 
football 
game against the 
Boilermakers. Illinois 
lost to Purdue in front 
of a near sell- 
out crowd. 



Stoiyby 

Jennifer Williams & 

Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 




Layout by 
RyanAlmon 



Homecoming 11 



(story continued from page 10) 

said they rode on a wave of supportive spirit from the current university 

participants, and further bolstered by the returnees. 

"I just really enjoy hearing the crowd cheer. It's a great hype/' said Earl 
Walker, a junior in CBA who plays the cymbals with the Marching Illini. 

"There's lots of support. Everyone gets into the spirit, yelling and screaming 
and whatnot," said Jason Barman, a senior in LAS who also plays the cymbals. 
"And we have fun making them scream," Walker added. 

Halftime was not simply for the band members. The presentation of 
Homecoming Court members and the King and Queen highlighted the usual 
break-time agenda. 

Homecoming Court members enjoyed special privileges that made their 
experiences unique from the student body. "Something very special for us 
was an opportunity to meet the comeback guests. It was wonderful," said 
Michelle Blake, a senior in LAS and an elected court member. 

Blake also touched on the multicultural themes of this year's innovative 
events. "Also something very important was when Coach Tepper spoke at the 
pep rally about racial harmony. I think that's what Homecoming is all about, 
because we all come to one central place," Blake said. 

The Homecoming Court included Briant Kelly, a senior in Engineering, 
and Gretchen Jokisch, a senior in Agriculture, who filled the positions of King 
and Queen. 

The real action came before and after the half-time interlude. During 
football playing time, famed Illini defense failed to fend off the charge by the 
Purdue Boilermakers. A final touchdown would have pulled a winner out of 
al6-22 score with 10 seconds remaining. One yard short of the end zone, the 
Illini failed to change their destiny. 

Nevertheless, Homecoming activities participants came away with lif etime 
memories. "I think it's been a very unifying, very spirited, very exciting 
experience. It provided a wonderful experience for our families and memories 
of our years at U of I," Blake said. 

Other spectators felt Homecoming was universally appealing. "If s whatever 
you're in to - showing school spirit, attending athletic events," said Jane Kim, 
freshman in LAS. 




A fan is passed 
through the crowd 
during the first half 
of the Illini's 
Homecoming game 
against Purdue. 
Illinois fans packed 
Memorial Stadium 
for the game. 



12 Student Life 




Julie Larsen, junior in 
ALS and member of 
the Girls Next Door, 
throws candy during 
the homecoming 
parade. The parade 
ended at the Quad, 
the sight of the pep 
rally Friday night. 




down 



Gregory Drive during 
the Homecoming 
Parade. This year's 



Homecoming was 



Ikenberry's last as 
President of the 
University of Illinois. 





ecoming 13 





—Rick Widmer 



Bob 
Rose, 
Opera- 
tion and 
Mainte- 
nance 
employee, scrubs 
graffiti from a 
marble wall in 
Krannert Center for 
the 
Performing Arts. 
Assailants vandal- 
ized Krannert on 
Dec. 1, 1994 . 



Story by 
Vida Riskus 

Layout by 
Ryan Almon 




14 Student Life 




Pat Placzkozvski, graduate 
student in Theater, pitches in 
to help clean Krannert. By the 
time the evening performance 
opened in the Studio Theater, 
the defaced portraits of 
Herman and Ellnora Krannert 
had been rehung, and the 
iedication wall and teak 
wood floor were spotless. 




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On Dec. 1, 1994, between 1:00 and 6:00 a.m., the Krannert Center for the 
Performing Arts (KCPA) was vandalized. The KCPA staff arrived that 
morning to find the Cararra marble dedication wall and the portraits of 
Herman and Ellnora Krannert covered in graffiti. As of this publication, the 
vandals were unidentified. Police have taken the matter under investigation. 

"What the Krannert Center stands for is what's best about the human 
spirit, and it was painful to see that defaced," Charles Krebs, KCPA Project 
Coordinator, said. "We took a big blow, but down doesn't mean out." 

Indeed, those who called Krannert "home," including not only its 
staff and student volunteers, but U of I faculty members, students and 
anyone who happened to pass by, pulled together to clean the center. 
"People were in tears this morning," Jane Ellen Nickel, KCPA Public 
Information Manager, said. "But they worked to clean it up, and that is 
what Krannert is all about - people who love this place enough to get 
on their hands and knees." 

Regular patrons took this violation personally. Many called or wrote to 
express their concern and willingness to help put the lobby back together. 

"No one here is going to forget what happened," Krebs said. "I don't 
think whoever did this realizes what kind of service they've done, bringing 
these people together." 

Because the incident coincided with the sixth annual Day Without Art, 
a part of World AIDS Day, a tradition that honors those in the artistic 
community who have been afflicted with AIDS-related illnesses, it was 
theorized that those who vandalized Krannert were protesting Krannert' s 
decision to hold performances that evening. 

During the day, staff and student volunteers manned an AIDS 
information booth with a videotape and pamphlets in the Krannert lobby. 
Every performance opened with an audio taped presentation of Day 
Without Art. Performances continued in accordance with the KCPA 
statement that the best way to combat AIDS is through education, and 
since KCPA was an educational institution, it was to promote AIDS 
Appreciation Day by remaining open. 

"Krannert means a lot to many people," Krebs said. "And it couldn't 
have been better demonstrated than to have so many students and staff 
working together to clean everything up in time for that evening's 
performances." By the time "A Piece of My Heart" opened in the Studio 
Theater at 8:00 p.m., the portraits had been rehung, and the dedication wall 
and teak wood floor were spotless. 

The "Krannert spirit" was kept alive in disaster by all those who 
participated in the cleaning and by those who attended the evening's 
four performances. "The overriding emotion was not anger," Krebs 
said. "It was sadness." 



Rick Widmer 



University students, Krannert 
employees and professors 
work to clean graffitti from 
Colwell Playhouse steps. 
Despite the vandalism, all 
Krannert shows were able to 
play as scheduled. 



Krannert Vandalized 15 




addresses graduates 

about issues ranging 

from fighting for 

freedom in South 

Africa to fighting 

crime on campus. 




Story by 
Amara Rozgus 

Layout by 

Peggy Christensen 

& Ryan Almon 



Hillary Rodham Clinton receives at\ 
honorary degree of doctor of lazvs during 
the University of Illinois commencement 
ceremonies on May 15, 1994. Also receiving 
honorary degrees were Billy Taylor 
Barbara Everitt Bryant, Katherine Dunhan 
and Miroslav Marcovich. 



Student Life 



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-Darren King 



For some, this was the last "lecture" they would ever hear. For others, it 
was a stepping stone to the next level of education. And for many, it was 
a time to consider all of those things that were never done during those 
years here at the U of I. What ceremony could encompass all of these 
thoughts, a speech by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and approximately 
8,000 people wearing robes and funny little caps? None other that the 123rd 
Commencement of the U of I. 

Along with the bachelor's, doctoral, professional and master's degrees 
and advanced certificates awarded to the students, five honorary degrees 
were also awarded to outstanding individuals. These included: Hillary 
Rodham Clinton, recipient of and honorary degree of doctor of laws; Billy 
Taylor, who received an honorary degree of doctor of musical arts; and 
Barbara Everitt Bryant, Katherine Dunham and Miroslav Marcovich each 
received an honorary degree of doctor of humane letters. 

Freedom was stressed during Rodham Clinton's May 15, 1994, speech. 
Having just returned from a trip to South Africa, she spoke about Nelson 
Mandella's newfound freedom and his unconditional forgiveness. 

"A good portion of the beginning of her speech were her experiences 
with Mandella," said Amanda Nadolski, 1994 graduate from LAS. "She 
said [Mandella] stressed that we need to learn to work with people of all 
different types - including enemies." 

Rodham Clinton also touched upon another issue in her speech - one 
that affects nearly everyone on campus. She stated that violence in the U. 
S. eats away at America's freedom. "We are not free until we can walk 
down Green Street or across the Quad without fear of being attacked," 
Rodham Clinton said. "We are not free until we do not have to lock our 
doors at night." 

The First Lady's speech touched everyone in the audience - Rodham 
Clinton supporters and opposers alike. "She was a great speaker," said 
Nadolski. "She got you involved and brought you into the speech." 

Assembly Hall was nearly filled by the crowds at both the morning and 
afternoon ceremonies. Rodham Clinton received a standing ovation for her 
uplifting speech. 

"She spoke to everyone, and I really believe what she had to say was true 
about our country," said Beth Spoonamore, a graduate student. 

The commencement ceremony was an important day for many students. 
A strong and distinguished stepping stone into "the real world," May 15, 
1994, will become an important page in many people's personal history. 



Graduation 17 



: 




offers customers 
good food, good 
service, a large selec- 
tion of draft and 
import beers and a 
relaxed atmosphere. 



Story by 

Peggy Christensen 



r# 




John Kosmopoulos is the owner 
of Gypsy, a bar in downtown 
Champaign. Kosmopoulos said 
thatthebarhasD] per-formances 
during the week, and offers 
customers an alternative to the 
typical campus bar scene. 



Layout by 

Colleen Murray 




LS Student Life 




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It has been a long, long night. You have been all over campus chugging beers, 
slamming shots and having fun with your friends. Now, as you worship the 
porcelain god, your mind tries to recall all of the different bars that you visited 
during the course of the night. Does it really matter? All of them have the same 
purpose - to serve you your favorite drinks until you are as drunk as a skunk and 
as sick as a dog. 

The establishments seem to be the same year after year - at least on the outside. 
Each one has a different reputation and attracts a different crowd of students. 
Loud music, dark booths or cheap drink specials are a few ways that bars make 
a distinct personality for themselves on campus amongst the bar "regulars." 

Since this bar-frequenting population was by no means a homogeneous one, 
the bars themselves catered to different tastes. 

Kam's, Home of the Drinking Illini, and CO. Daniel's, for instance, were 
known as hot entertainment spots for Greeks. One or the other of them was the 
site for many an exchange or initiation activity. Also, CO. Daniel's attracted 
many students away from their weekday study habits to party and sing to music 
from the 80s at Time Warp Tuesday. "Time Warp helps me to relive my puberty 
years," said Carol Weber, senior in CBA. 

Die-hard dance fans found Joe's or Cochrane's more to their taste. Gypsy's in 
downtown Champaign featured an unusual selection of international beers. 
Music-oriented bars such as Mabel's or The Blind Pig Co. brought in local as well 
as more well-known bands. "I love to go to Mabel's and the Blind Pig for the music 
and the people. There is something different about these bars - they aren't your typical 
campus bars. And, they serve European beers!" said Julie Barton, senior in FAA. 

Those who liked to eat as well as drink gravitated toward the pub-style 
Murphy's or Esquire. And those who know how to have some boot-stomping fun 
can always be found at Bradley's on country nights. 

Notwithstanding such seemingly set-in-stone reputations, the bar scene does 
change. New employees are hired, drinks are invented and management changes. 
For example, Gully's Riverview Inn, experienced a switch in ownership in 1994, 
and, with the new year, a switch in name. The Library, as it now known, placed 
a renewed emphasis on food in the form of a deli environment where customers 
place orders and are called when their food is ready. The number of beers on tap 
was also increased to 16, which according to manager Rice Lewis was more than 
any other campustown bar. 

O'Malley's, long a favorite for its dugout atmosphere, pool tables and the 
midnight "American Pie" ritual also changed formats while students were at 
home for the holidays. Renamed Six Feet Under, the bar changed to an alternative 
format, focusing on cutting edge alternative music. More drink specials and a 
larger selection of beer were added, while the well-known "American Pie" 
tradition was abandoned. 

Another campustown bar, Bub's had a reputation of its own, but change did 
not seem to play a major factor. Dave Dziedzac, the manager of Bub's and senior 
in LAS, stated, "I don't think anything has changed since I took over as manager. 
I think Bub's attracts customers because it is a low key bar and we don't feel it is 
necessary to have a cover charge." 

Whether it be Central Tap, the Silver Bullet or Deluxe, the variety of bars in the 
Urbana-Champaign area will undoubtedly be able to please almost everyone. 



Students sing and dance to the tune 
of "American Pie" in O'Malley's 
Pub. With the new year, 
O'Malley's changed its name to 
Six Feet Under and abandoned this 
long-time tradition. 



Local Bars 19 




— Rick Widmer 

the Illinois Dad's 
Day football game. 
)drick was one of 
the dads that partici- 
pated in the half- 
time show. 




Story by 
Jennifer William 
3$& 



Layout by 
Colleen Murray 




20 Student Life 




Dads of University of Illinois Band members 
salute while their sons and daughters perform 
during half-time of this year's Dad's Day 
football game. Illinois played Northern 
Illinois and beat them 34-10. 




Louis Sands, President of the Dad's 
Association, Donald Kendeigh, ofWestwood, 
Mass., and his daughter, Anne, sing the Alma 
Mater during halftime festivities at theDad's 
Day football game. Kendeigh was namedKing 
Dad after his daughter nominated him. 







rd of u 



Whaf '$ New <9n 
Pad's Pan 



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-Rick Widmer 




There was a less noticeable, but family-oriented attraction destined to 
take place at the Illini Union on Sept. 17. With only a $4 admission fee, 
Blizzard of Bucks made its Dad's Day premiere as an alternative to the 
usual bar scene for students and their family. 

Erin Baker, junior in Engineering, was the main woman behind the 
Bucks planning. "We needed a Dad's Day event where the whole family 
could participate as an alternative to the bars," Baker said. "We looked into 
the Kramer Agency Review and the Blizzard of Bucks had great reviews." 

Having only three weeks to prepare for Bucks limited the pre-game 
exposure to word of mouth, especially because the few posters scattered 
around campus were covered by the next morning by other posters 
announcing the weekend's events. Lights, music and a huge glass booth 
helped Bucks transform Illini Union rooms A, B and C into a simulated 
game show complete with host Tim Wise and his assistant, Miss Valerie. 
Wacky and amusing elimination games helped find contestants. Participants 
were asked to throw rubber chickens into a bucket with a shovel while 
saying "Chubby Bunnies" with six marshmallows stuffed into their cheeks. 
12 contestants were narrowed down to 3, who competed against each other 
to enter the grand prize round of the "Money Machine." 

Laughter echoed through the room as the randomly drawn contestants 
battled their way to be the one and only finalist. Angie Schennum, graduate 
student in LAS, was the final winner earning $121 during the hour-long 
game show. "Being in the Money Machine was such a frenzy with all the 
money blowing around you, that it was hard to grab the money in 60 
seconds," said Schennum. 

Blizzard of Bucks competed with the annual Krannert Center's Dad's 
Day Show on Saturday night. This show featured the Men's Glee Club and 
The Other Guys in a traditional night of college fight songs and jokes about 
the Morrow plots, a special treat for the alumni dads. 

Scheduled events were not the only way to enjoy Dad's Day on the U of 
I campus. Bill Cosby, Adam Sandler, the crowning of King Dad - Donald 
Kendeigh, father of senior Anne Kendeigh - and the victory over Northern 
Illinois 34-10 were the events that topped the memorable highlights of the 
traditional weekend. 

With all the activities planned for the annual weekend, Dad's Day might 
have meant bonding between a father and his student, but for some that 
bonding was not always possible. "My dad hasn't been down for 3 years, 
but within the house there are so many dads that do come down that it is 
easy to adopt a dad for the weekend," said Charlie Mourning, junior in LAS 
and a member of Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. 



Angie Schennum, graduate student in LAS, 
tries to gather as much money as possible 
during her sixty second stint in the Money 
machine. Schennum was the final winner 
earning $121 during the hour-long game show. 



- Lavanya Raohatkrishnan 



Dad's Day 21 




These 
muffins, 
cupcakes 
and 
slices of 
pie are 
donated 
by Sweet 
Indul- 
gence. Other indi- 
viduals and busi- 
nesses donate food 
and money to the 
Saint Jude House, a 
local soup kitchen. 



Story by 

Jennifer Arendarczyk 

Layout by 
Anna Nommensen 




Ellen McDowell, financial 
off icer of the soup kitchen, talks 
with a guest while tending to 
other needs of the table. 
McDowell said about 65-70 
people typically attend the free 
lunch service offered between 
11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. daily. 

Alva Luckey, one of about 100 
active volunteers, dishes out 
soup in the Saint Jude House 
located at 317 South Randolph 
in Champaign. Luckey said they 
use two gallons and two 26- 
ounce cans of soup during a 
typical lunch day. 



22 Student Life 





Re* 




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Volunteering is a word that may never enter the mind of a college student. 
Some students help the community in the context of a social organization, but 
for others it is a way of life. 

Meg Cederoth, senior in LAS, volunteered at A Woman's Place for three 
years. She completed a 40 hour training session during her sophomore year 
and continued to help there. 

A Woman's Place is a shelter which provides resources for victims of 
domestic violence. Cederoth's job at the shelter included answering the phone 
and helping new residents move in. "The coworkers provided a supportive 
and understanding atmosphere for me and the women and children at the 
shelter," Cederoth said. She did at times find her work stressful because 
"some of the women were beyond help." 

Cederoth also pointed out the frustrations of dealing with the bureaucracy 
of the court and police systems. Yet these minor set backs never discouraged 
Cederoth from devoting her time to helping others. 

Mark Tice, senior in LAS, also took an interest in community volunteering. 
In the spring of 1994, Tice found himself in a sociology class which required 
him to help community members. He chose the Urbana Adult Education 
Center, a program which focused on Adult Literacy and Teaching of English. 
He liked it so much that he returned in the fall of 1994. Tice worked as a 
volunteer tutor in a classroom for the English as a Second Language (ESL) 
adults. He devoted three hours a week to help those interested in developing 
their reading skills. 

Working in this program enabled Tice to "help improve people's lives by 
helping them read." Tice also said, "It helps them to get jobs and to be more 
marketable." He did regret that he was unable to help more people. 

Elizabeth Milnarik, senior in LAS, gave her time to two different places. 
Through a friend from her church, she became interested in the St. Jude's 
Catholic Worker House and the McKinley Men's Winter Shelter, located at the 
McKinley Church & Foundation. St. Jude's houses a soup kitchen in the 
basement where Milnarik cooked lunches every Saturday. She cooked and 
served for forty to eighty people. 

The McKinley Men's Winter Shelter opens for the winter season in October 
and closes in April. McKinley provides shelter during the cold night hours, 
opening at 8 p.m. and closing at 8 a.m. 

Milnarik said, "The shelter is a real challenge for me." The experience 
provided her with the opportunity to deal with and "get to know people I 
would not normally meet" in the campus setting. 

Students from all walks of life and all majors volunteer because they want 
to - not because they have to! Volunteering provides a way for students to get 
involved in the community in order to assist in a cause that they believe in. 



Volunteering 23 




Eric 

Hudson, 

sophmore 

in LAS, 

puts on 

his 

nametag 

while 

— Matt Grotto 

preparing to usher at 
a performance of 
"Member of the Wed- 
ding" at Krannert 
Center for the Per- 
forming Arts. Hudson 
said he enjoys the job 
and he gets to watch 
the show for free. 




Story by 
Vida Riskus 

Layout by 

Ryan Almon & 

Peggy Christensen 



24 



c Life 





Comelio Casaclangand 
a friend mix the music 
for a performance at the 
Illini Union Patio. The 
performance was put on 
by the Krannert Center 
Student Association. 

Audra Masten, senior 
in Agriculture, sings 
"Like a Virgin." Her 
performancewaspart of 
No Acts Barred, an open 
mic night at the Illini 
Union's new Patio 
commons area. 






&mvha& on A^o^ia+ioKi 



Krannert Center Student Association (KCSA), an organization which provided 
ushers, tour guides and technical crews for the Krannert Center for Performing Arts 
(KCPA), redefined itself this year. As members of the second largest volunteer 
organization on campus and one with a long-time devotion to the workings of 
Krannert, students introduced a new emphasis - the 'A,' or 'association.' 

"We recognize the effort and sacrifice each of us provides when doing any of the 
many things a KCSA member does," said Cornelio Casaclang, senior in LAS and 
president of KCSA. "But hey, we're cool, we're diverse, we share a common interest 
in the Krannert Center and the performing arts and we also like to have fun." 

To that end, the KCSA Administrative Board of officers and departmental 
directors (AdBoard) began by revamping its General Meeting, the introductory 
information night held each semester. The AdBoard presented the different KCSA 
departments in the form of a mini-tour of the center, providing new members with 
a hands-on approach toward not only appreciating the center, but also toward 
deciding what areas interested them. 

"For those new members who never endured, I mean attended, one of the old 

general meetings, a quick description would be ZZZZZZZZ," said Jose Bahena, 

senior in LAS and vice president of KCSA. "The point is it was an hour with a group 
of strangers (AdBoard members) talking at you from the stage in Foellinger Great Hall." 

Judging from the enthusiasm abounding in the punch and cookie ceremony in the 
lobby afterward, this year's meeting was a big change over past years. "Have you 
every paused the moment before the first in a complex string of dominoes was 
knocked over? That's what I felt - anticipation, excitement," said Charlie Krebs, 
KCSA advisor and KCPA employee. "There were a lot of untried things about to take 
place, and if I ever saw trust at work, it was that night. KCSA was about the reinvent 
itself, taking the emphasis off the 'K' and putting it on 'you.' No one knew if it would 
work, but it did." 

The changes did not stop here. Keeping consistent with the 'A' goal, KCSA 
sponsored several first-time social activities to promote interaction among the 
organization's more than 400 members. 

The day after the general meetings, Thurs., Sept. 1, the KCSA kicked off its 
'associative' year with an ice-skating party. Students paid a small fee to help defray 
the cost of renting the center, and they spent the night practicing their Olympic 
techniques. They did take occasional breaks to enjoy refreshments and buy the official 
KCSA T-shirts. 

On Thurs., Oct. 20, KCSA sponsored No Acts Barred, an open mic night at the Illini 
Union's new Patio commons area. This event spotlighted a number of hidden talents 
within and outside of the organization, giving former high school theater performers 
a chance to relive their stage days. 

No Acts Barred brought in acts which included skits, stand-up comedy and poetry 
reading. Musical performances ranged from a power tool band to a Madonna 
impersonator to a soloist who played the harmonica with his nose. 

Other activities included a Halloween Party and a Dance Show. "Among many of 
us KCSAers exist closet performers of every sort," Casaclang said. "So we are trying 
to produce our own shows that can show off the many talents of KCSA members. We 
might be a big club, but all that means is more wonderful people to meet." 





KCSA 25 




A student 

and her 

mother 

peruse the 

offerings 

at the 

craft 

show 

held in 

—Carlos Miranda 

the lllini Union. The 
craft show was one 
of many events spon- 
sored by a variety of 
different groups for 
Mom's weekend. 




Story by 
Kristina Castillo 

Layout by 
Suk Ju Yun 



Kelly Beckett, senior in Agriculture, and her mother, 
Diane, examine flowers at the annual Flower and 
Garden Show during Mom's Weekend. The Flower and 
Garden show is organized by the Horticulture Club 
and is held annually at the Stock Pavilion. 



6 Student Life 



M' 




e «- Night 

A ~V\mc> for ^ondrnx 



Out 



It is 9:04 a.m. and the alarm clock has been ringing for the past four minutes. "Isn't 
it Saturday?" the student mumbles, rolling over to dig for the clock under the pile of 
dirty laundry. She finds it and switches it off, but the ringing persists. It takes her 
another minute to realize that it is the telephone. "Who the..." she growls as she picks 
up the receiver. "Hi honey! It's mom. I'm downstairs." Immediately, she jumps out 
of bed, shoving the laundry, empty beer cans and pizza boxes under the bed. But how 
will she get rid of that smell...? Mom's Day Weekend has officially begun. 

For thousands of students at the University of Illinois, Mom's Day Weekend was 
a time to make up to mom for all of the missed phone calls, letters and weekends home 
It was also a day to show off to parents all that the U of I has to offer. 

Mandy Feldman, junior in LAS, felt she took advantage of that special time. "My 
mom and I went to see the Silver Jubilee at Krannert, the Craft Fair at the Union and 
the Flower and Garden Show." 

Other campus events included the annual IUB Spring Musical, "Follies," a 
synchronized swimming show and the IUB fashion show. Many of the Greek houses 
held brunches and dinner dances for their moms, and just about everyone sampled 
the local cuisine. Many students took advantage of this opportunity to escape - if only 
for a weekend - from residence hall food. "My mom paid for dinner," said Megan 
Kerr, senior in LAS. "It was wonderful!" 

Most restaurants were booked for this night weeks in advance, so students knew 
to make reservations early. "We ate," said Jason Dovalovsky, senior in CB A, referring 
to his day with his mother. "Oh yeah, and we saw Atius." 

The Atius-SachemMom'sDaySingwasoneofthemostpopulareventsof the weekend. 
Comprised of eight seven-minute musical shows, a competition for first place motivated 
each group to perform at its best. A mostly Greek show, the surprise winner in the Spring 
of 1994 was a group from Allen Hall, with their cheerful musical set in a 1950s diner. 

Other moms preferred to spend their day in a more relaxed setting. Ester 
Cabrades, sophomore in LAS, and her mother attended a banquet sponsored by the 
Minority Student Affairs Office. This banquet honored minority students in the 
Educational Opportunity Program who achieved a grade point average of 4.3 or 
higher. Cabrades and her mother spent the rest of the day wandering around 
campustown and the Quad. "This was her very first time coming down," Cabrades 
said. "Now she finally knows what I'm talking about!" 

More adventuresome moms saw college life unmasked. Some moms went out 
with their young adults to the bars and after-hour fraternity parties. "My mom slept 
at my sorority house," said Amy Kesman, sophomore in CBA. "The people down the 
hall were kind of obnoxious that night when they came in from the bars, but 
amazingly enough, she slept through it," added Kesman. 

Unfortunately, not everyone was lucky enough to have Mom's company for the 
weekend. "My mom had to work," said Woosuk Park, a first year graduate student 
in Biology. "I just walked around to see what was happening," Park added. Some 
students were adopted by their friends' sympathetic parents for the weekend 
activities, while other students took advantage of an opportunity to stay in and study, 
avoiding the long lines all over campus. 

The truly devoted Dovalovsky said, "I guess it's just a chance to show your mom 
that you care and that you appreciate her." For most, this is true. It would be wise, 
however, not to forget the three true key words of Mom's Weekend - bonding, 
shopping and quality dining. 



Mom's Day 27 




Miki 

Inman, 

senior in 

CBA and 

member 

of the 

Illinois 

Flag 

Corps, 

tosses 

her flag 

in the air 

at Quad 

Day. 

Student organizations 

set Up displays on the 

Quad to try to attract 

prospective members. 




Story by 
Kristina Castillo 

Layout by 

Monica Soltesz & 

Ryan Almon 



28 Student Life 






I TV* ®^ d p ^ 5ri ^ ^Bfl 

On Wednesday, Aug. 24, 1994, hundreds of booths were set up on the 
Quad for the annual U of I Quad Day. "Quad Day is the only way to see 
most of the clubs and organizations at Illinois. It's easier to be able to see 
them all at once. It saves a lot of time," said Geoff Ellis, sophomore in CBA. 

Thousands of students were out for the big day on the Quad to gather 
information about clubs and organizations. "It is important to make a big 
deal about this because this school is not only academics - your involvement 
on campus is important too," Ellis added. For the past thirty plus years that 
Quad Day had been in existence, it has been designated solely for the 
benefit of the students. There was everything from religious fellowships to 
environmental organizations to gay, lesbian and bisexual groups to booths 
for Assembly Hall, the Planet and many of U of Fs fraternities. 

"Quad Day is an easy way to become involved in something you like," 
said Jenny Kanaris, sophomore in Education. Kanaris, who worked a 
booth for the Eastern Orthodox Christian Fellowship, believed that this 
day allowed "a better opportunity to explain things about the club you 
represent. It's a big thing. There are thousands of people walking past your 
booth, and you had the chance to grab their attention." 

Although its main attraction may have been its informational purposes, 
Quad Day was much more than that. It was a hang out - a huge picnic on 
the Quad for all. Most agreed it was the first huge social event of the new 
fall semester. 

It was the place where the "family reunion" of last spring semester took 
place. "Since it's the beginning of the year, you can see all the people you 
haven't seen all summer, and see what they want to do," Ellis said. 

The Quad was also a source of relaxation for many. After moving back 
into an apartment, dorm or house, Quad Day satisfied those who needed 
to find a shady spot and unwind. It may have been the last lazy day of 
summer for some. 

Because Quad Day only comes once a year, anyone who missed it is it out 
of luck - until next year. 




-Rick Widmer 



The Illinettes perform one of their well-drilled routines 
for students at Quad Day. Their dance was part of a full 
day of entertainment on the Quad. 

Oliver Koo, freshman in Engineering, focuses on his body 
position in hopes of winning the Quad Day limbo contest. 
The lllini Union Board sponsored the day's festivities. 



Quad Day 29 





The 
hands of 
Carla 
Boudreau, 
employee 
at Straw- 
berry 
Fields 
since 1980, scoop out 
sundried tomato 
pesto. About 30 in- 
store dishes are made 
and on display in the 
display case each day. 



— Man Grotto 



Story by 
Kristina Castillo 

Layout by 
Suk Ju Yun 




Hazem Jaber, a 1989 graduate in civil 
engineering, accepts money from Ashish Naik, 
sophomore in LAS, and Smita Manusmare, 
sophomore in LAS, for foods in the Hop -N- 
Shop store. Both Naik and Manusmare said 
that they shop at the store about three times 
a month because Hop-N-Shop has the best 
selection for Indian foods in town. 

Ellen Terzian, a former University of Illinois 
student and Urbana resident, straightens 
products on the shelves of Strawberry Fields. 
Strawberry Fields is known for offering 
customers earth conscious products and 
service with a smile. 





30 Student Life 







J, Hood^ and Wan-fc I. 

First stop: Strawberry Fields. This Urbana store was rich with everything from 
herbal remedies to grocery needs to bath supplies. "We have a lot of organic, 
vegetarian things. You couldn't find this stuff anywhere else in these towns," said 
Sharz Heidari, freshman in LAS and employee. 

Strawberry Fields catered to the special needs of others and was concerned about 
the environment, too. The store carried lactose-free foods and soy-based foods, and 
cosmetic items were ones that were not tested on animals. "It's Earth conscious - 1 like 
to help out any way I can," said Heidari about her enthusiasm on the job. "I also like 
the store because the people [customers] are nice, more so than most stores. We're 
very social with our customers because we see the same people a lot." 

Interesting items the store included in its inventory that might have been hard to 
find elsewhere included the following: BLUE corn chips; Male Vitality Tea, Women's 
Cycle Tea and teas for the pregnant woman, the nursing mother, the dieter and for 
those women who suffer badly from PMS; vitamins of any and every sort; and a deli 
area with yummy treats, freshly baked bread and cheeses. 

Second stop: Art Mart, Lincoln Square Mall, Urbana. Art Mart included anything 
and everything under the kitchen sink. It included a toy store; a bakery, deli, and 
kitchenware store; and a gift-item store. 

"A lot of students are 'poor' and we have a lot of nice, cute things that are 
inexpensive. Christmas shopping is great here because nothing is generic. We have 
cool things that have a higher, nicer quality. It's nothing students can't afford," said 
Jennifer McLane, Art Mart employee. 

The store's unique atmosphere boasted an array of print and bold colored 
umbrellas hanging from the ceiling. All types of seasonal knick-knacks, stationery, 
journal, address books and photo albums all covered in printed fabrics were 
practically wall-to-wall. Party supplies including wrapping paper, all variations and 
colors of ribbon and party lights were all right there at the drop of a hat. Anyone could 
lose himself or herself in this gift shop frenzy. 

The deli's Crate and Barrel-like atmosphere was stocked with household goods of 
every size and shape. Colorful dishes, coffee mugs, coffee makers, cookie cutters, pot 
holders, espresso machines, lunch bags and "fun kitchen stuff" like egg cups, yogurt 
cheese funnels and flag party picks lay in tidy bins or on meticulously arranged 
shelves. And food? Salsas, crackers, cheese, specialty sauces, pasta and bakery 
cookies. "We're famous for our croissants. They're the best in town. A good buy too 
- really inexpensive." said Jill Berge, freshman in LAS and employee. 

Last stop: Hop -N- Shop, Urbana. This store specialized in international and 
natural foods. At least a dozen nationalities of students shopped there regularly, 
including Indian, Mexican, Middle Eastern, European, Islamic and American. "Here 
you can find foods that you have in your own country and are used to eating. It's a 
'home' feeling because people come and see people that speak the same language. 
Then they don't miss their families as much," said Bahaa Ali, second year Ph.D. 
student in Veterinary Medicine and employee. The friendly, warm environment of 
the store allowed customers to shop with special care and attention. 

Other specialty stores to check out are the Coffee Company located in Marketplace 
and the ever soothing Walnut Street Tea Company in Downtown Champaign. 




Specialty Shops 31 




Keeley 
Chikos, 
an 
Illinette, 
holds her 
cowboy hat during 
the little sibs week- 
end half-time cel- 
ebration. Members 
of high school bands 
throughout the state 
visited as well as 
students 1 brothers 
and sisters. 



Story by 
Jennifer Williams 

Layout by 
Erin Evans 




The University of Illinois' 
trumpet section plays during 
the half-time festivities of 
Siblings/Band Weekend. The 
half-time show is a popular 
part of the football game. 

Mt. Carmel Tlag corps mem- 
bers walk across the field 
in Memorial Stadium dur- 
ing Siblings/Band Weekend 
celebration. Several high 
schools from around the state 
came to Champaign to 
perform. 




32 Student iB 




y** 9 . 



the p 



"Faiyiilie^ 
Oomo TbzcAhor 



^Wve 






Was the campus bombarded by child proteges or was it the 
miniaturization of the average college student Sept. 10, 1994? Actually, 
Siblings' Day on campus was a gorgeous and sunny Saturday. The annual 
weekend was celebrated with the first home football game of the season 
against Missouri, whom the Fighting Illini pounded 42-0, and Band Day, 
in which over 2500 high school students gathered on the field at half-time 
to perform with the Marching Illini. Each high school featured appeared on 
the new scoreboard that was constructed this year. 

Students got to treat their younger - or sometimes older - siblings to the 
typical college life for the weekend or for the evening. Some siblings were 
lucky enough to be able to attend Greek ceremonies with their siblings. 
"Bidnight was interesting because everyone kept asking my little brother 
how he got in," said Alison McCarty, freshman in LAS. "I honestly thought 
the guys were going to punish him by using him to play basketball." 

Blood relations did not comprise the entire younger population on 
campus. The university adopted about 35 high school bands to perform 
"Stars and Stripes Forever" and "America the Beautiful" to the 63,000+ 
crowd at the football game. The bands traveled from all over Illinois to 
show off their musical talent, accompanied by pompon and flag corps. "It's 
a great chance to see our possible future talent," said Brett Atwater, 
freshman in LAS, and a trombone player for the Marching Illini. "It gives 
the students a chance to see what performing in front of a large crowd is 
really like." 

Not only did Band Day kick off the 1994 football season, but it also 
marked the beginning of several other football rituals. Dorms, fraternities, 
sororities and I blocks introduced a season of fun for students. Outside the 
stadium, companies and parents began their tailgate barbecues for the 
season. "Football blocks are always fun because you get to spend time with 
your friends and have fun with the people in your block and in the blocks 
around you," said Jenny Daley, sophomore in LAS. 

Not only did a winning game highlight the weekend celebration between 
students and siblings, but it helped to bond families far away from each 
other. "It was great to see them because they live 3 hours from here. Since 
I don't get home much, we got to have a great weekend where I now call 
home," said Daley. 



Sibs/BandDay 33 







Lupita 


j3| 


mm *•"" Jlr 


Ortega, 
sopho- 




JPP 


more in 
CBA, 




•>j^ 


picks out 
wedding 




—Lee Anne Paulausk 



gowns at a local 
bridal shop in antici- 
pation of her impor- 
tant day. "This is 
going to be so much 
work once I really 
start getting into 
this," Ortega said. 




Lupita Ortega looks over the many 
accessories in the glass case to make 
her "bridal-look" complete. Many 
students meet their soon-to-be mates 
at U of I. 

Groom-to-be Tony Signorella, 
sophomore in CBA, tries on a tuxedo 
jacket recently for his upcoming 
wedding to Lupita Ortega. 
Signorella and Ortega are best 
friends, a quality that many people 
look for in a mate. 



Story by 
Kristina Castillo 

Layout by 
Colleen Murray 



4 Srudent Life 





\ 



-Lee Anne Paulauski 




v Oioma Oiof Married _n v/ 1 



Just what is in the air to make all of these students fall foolishly in love at 
such a ripe young age? Is this good, is this bad? Why this tremendous fad? 
Maybe Cupid is just plain old sick of us not finding our true loves and 
complaining about it to all of our friends. 

Well, he certainly has shot his arrow into those select few. Take, for 
example, Lupita Ortega, sophomore in CBA, and the young love in her life, 
Tony Signorella, also a sophomore in CBA. "Everyone always told me that 
when you find the one that you want to spend your life with, you will know 
- there is no way to explain this feeling," Ortega said. "I never believed them 
until I met Tony. I have never been more sure of anything before in my whole 
life." 

The couple met at the beginning of their freshman year, and they have been 
starry-eyed ever since. "We had both been in bad relationships before meeting 
and thought we had been in love in those relationships, but we learned with 
each other that love doesn't hurt. With each other we learned how nice it is to 
be loved and appreciated, and to have a best friend in one another," Ortega 
said. "Before she was my girlfriend she had to be my friend, and now she's my 
best friend," said Signorella. 

Beth Reason, senior in Agriculture, had been dating her fiance since they 
were juniors in high school. "We considered getting married while still in 
college, but it wasn't good financially. I'm glad we're waiting because of 
studies, and school work can be a lot of stress on a new marriage," Reason said . 

Here's a sweet-as-molasses kind of story: Reason was engaged in April of 
her junior year. Both of her roommates at that time had gotten engaged within 
that previous six months. The two girls had known about their "surprise," and 
were taken out to dinner and the works. Reason's little dumplin' did not even 
tell her that he had been getting up at 3 a.m. to go to an extra job to pay for her 
"surprise." One night after a youth group meeting they had together, they 
stopped at McDonald's. He asked her to get some napkins because he had 
forgotten. "He surprised me that day. As I started coming back to the table, I 
could see it," Reason said. This creative little bugger slipped it over her straw 
and allowed it to rest on the top other soda pop. "I started to bawl immediately, 
and everyone there thought we were having a fight," Reason added. 

Kathy Pagakis, sophomore in LAS, said, "I think it's a good idea to wait to 
get married after college is over so your futures are secure. It's good to be sure 
so you don't jump into something you aren't ready for." 

Pagakis did, however, somewhat understand the strong urge to tie the knot 
once that one true love is found. "I guess if you are ready for it now, then go 
for it, but don't take the decision too lightly," Pagakis said. 

Well, hopefully Mr. or Ms. Right is knocking down your door - or leaving 
rings on your McDonald's cups. However it is done and whenever it happens, 
let's hope you do not let him or her slip through your lucky little fingers. 



Getting Married 35 




• 3 Oonl Try 
•Hi To Buy! 



PS "SHOPS 



Police 
try to 
discour- 
age 
underage 
drinking 
with a 
"COPS 
In 

— Peggy Gibbons 

SHOPS" sign. An 

officer may pose as an 

employee to catch 

underage students 

trying to buy alcohol. 



yLmm'dSmm 




Story by 
Gabrielle Caputo 

Layout by 
Suk Ju Yun 



O'Malley's bouncer, Dave Hamilton, checks 
another ID on a typically busy night. As a 
residt of stiffer fines for underage drinking, 
bars are implementing stricter policies on 
checking patrons' identification. 



36 Student Life 



Pan i HL X?** IT)9 

V^*^ PoiA/Kl OKI OWe-ragC- PriKifciKi^. • 

It is Friday night and you have no classes for two whole days, so what does that 
mean? PARTY! But where? Well no one is having a party and after hours do not start 
until the bars close. All of your friends want to go to the bars first. The problem 
though is that if you are under the age of 21 you may not either be allowed in the bar 
or allowed to drink. In fact you may even be approached by a police officer and asked 
for an ID. This last year there has been a great overall enforcement on the legal age 
of admittance into bars and the legal drinking age for minors. Also, the fine for 
underage drinking has been increased to $250 for those who are aged 19-20 and $500 
for those under the age of 19. So what is a student to do? Well it seems that they are 
going to continue to go and drink. 

"All of my friends go and there is nothing else to do," said Larry Barry, a student 
in Communication and an 18 year old freshman. This seems to be one of the main 
reasons students have for going to the bars. There is not much for students to do. If 
they decide on a movie or dinner their evening will usually end by 1 1 :00 P.M. On 
campus or off, students feel that the amount of alternatives to the bars are almost none 
especially when the majority of their friends are at the bars. 

As a student approaches a bar, the door man on duty at the entrance will ask to see 
his or her identification card. From that point the student is merely allowed to enter 
the premises. If the student is age 21 or over, then he or she would receive a stamp on 
his or her hand which would allow him or her to drink in the bar. However, this last 
year there has been an enormous increase of police "walk throughs." That means that 
the Champaign Police Department is ordering their officers to walk through the bars 
asking patrons to present an identification card as proof of their legal age even though 
they had been properly admitted or stamped when they entered the bar. Jean Slowik, 
a student in CB A and a 20-year-old junior said, "After we are admitted in a bar, there 
should not be anyone patrolling the bar. It says that the university police have nothing 
better to do with their time other than raid a college bar." 

Katy De Leon, age 20, is a junior in CB A and within the last three years of her college 
life she has been fined twice. She still continues to go to the bars and still continues 
to drink. Up until this 1994, if a student was caught drinking, they were given a 
citation or fine of $95. This past year, however, the fines for possession of alcohol has 
dramatically increased. Although these fines are steep, they have not prevented 
underage drinking. 

On campus and off campus bars are having walk throughs. In the past, these walk 
throughs of bars were done sporadically. There had never been any one person or 
department who was designated to conduct such searches, but there is now. 
Detective Sergeant Michael Cook is the head of a new Liquor Control Enforcement 
Program. He claims that the increase in alcohol control and the creation of this new 
program was due to an increase in alcohol related injuries, particularly alcohol 
poisoning. Sergeant Cook believes that the legal drinking age should remain 21; 
however, " if people at the age of 19 are going to be allowed in a bar where no food 
is served, then the legal age should be reduced to 19." 

Although the university police have made an attempt to put an end to under-age 
drinking, the weekends still remain the same. Students will look forward to their two 
days of relaxation and nights out at the bars with their friends; and, the police 
department will still be monitoring the bars and fining all under-age patrons who 
choose to drink. 



— Lavanya Raohakrishnan 



May I See Your ID? 37 





1^ 


Jen 
Steffgen, 
senior in 




'., / . • 


CBA, 




■iSl ■•■/* "** s 


spoons 




/4'"' '-f' 


some rice 
onto her 




— Veronica Alvarez 

plate. Ma 
enjoy 


ny students 
the freedom 



that apartment 

living provides their 

eating habits. 



Story by 
Jennifer Williams 

Layout by 
Colleen Murray 




Cyndi Czop, senior in Engineering, eats a 
meal of chicken and rice that she prepared in 
her apartment. Although some students enjoy 
cooking in their apartments, others find it 
more of a hassle than it is worth. 

Paul Heintz, senior in LAS, makes pancake 
batter in his apartment. Heintz says he likes 
apartment living because he can make 
whatever he wants and because he is not 
living in a box that is a foot by foot in length. 




,1 



38 Student Life 





Pei* 





of Din; 






ln 0in 



For the first year away from home, a dormitory offers a nice little catering 
package. Food, bed and laundry are within grasp. One does not need to worry 
about trifles such as rent, grocery shopping or paying power bills. Isn't this the life? 

Although dorm life has its advantages, many students find that living on 
their own in an apartment, perhaps with close friends, is more rewarding. 
That exciting step towards proving they can be responsible adults motivates 
students to take on what was perhaps the most troublesome challenge of being 
tenants - feeding themselves. 

Mealtimes in the apartment world are certainly not as consistent as in residence 
halls. One student's kitchen may reveal, for example, a young woman eating her 
meals in solitude amidst roommates who forgo that pleasure in favor of other 
activities . In another house or apartment, the kitchen may be Grand Central Station, 
with a group of amateur chefs trying new recipes every week. 

Living with roommates is not always what it is cracked up to be. "I thought when 
my friends and I moved in together we'd have a schedule of who cooked when for 
everyone," said Debbie Rich, senior in CBA. "But everyone is so busy that we don't 
have time to sit down and eat together. Occasionally, if you're in the kitchen at the 
right time, you'll end up eating with one of your roommates." 

Eating in one's own apartment definitely has its advantages. Students are able 
to go to the local grocery store and buy whatever they want instead of being forced 
to fulfill their nutritional - or maybe just sugar, caffeine and junk food - needs with 
what the cafeteria or free flow provided. 

"Living in an apartment, I'm able to buy low-fat food," said Kathy Burns, junior 
in Communications. "And I'm not confined to eating whafs available. Idon'tthink 
I've had stir-fry since I've lived on my own. If s easier to eat what I want. I never eat 
meals anymore. Anything with more than three ingredients is too tough. I like to 
be able to slap something together in five minutes and eat," Burns added. 

Another advantage to living in an apartment is the ability to eat whenever there 
was time instead of being constricted to cafeteria hours. Also, midnight raids to the 
kitchen are a definite bonus. 

"When I get in from going out or working, I like the fact that I can munch on 
something to sober up," said Jason Bullock, junior in Communications. "When I 
lived in the dorm, if I didn't have the food, I was out of luck and starving." 

Of course, living in the residence halls was not always considered a disadvantage. 
Students were still able to perform culinary experiments in the community kitchen. 
To keep from having to take a bus or drive to the grocery store, places like Perm 
Station and Tllir ri Orange provided cooking and baking supplies such as cookie 
dough and dried or canned soup. 

"If I miss a cafeteria meal, I can always free flow and get something to whip up 
on my own," said Shenika Harris, freshman in LAS. "Also, my friends and I can 
plan to cook dinner for all of us if we've ever got the energy." 

Although everyone's living style is different, eating will always be a necessity. 
These unusual eating habits will keep creative juices flowing. Bon Appetite! 



Cooking 39 




October 1994 
rf&wo hrom the other side ok the pond/ 

The rain has been very polite this wee£ and/ am in yood spirits . ike oney reaciy probound thiny that I can thin£ oh 
to sag, to you is that ' tnycand 'is dibberent hrom America. 70a have to be here, to believe some oh this stuhh 
I sent afon^ some pictures ok mysetfj and 'a bew others, but since you ve never studied abroad, there are a hew things 
b need to bill you in on. 

Studyiny abroad in Britain is the experience ok a libetime. It is the chance bar Of ob 1 students to yet out and not only 
experience another cucture, but also see more ok the world, it becomes a very personae achievement ahter a while as 
itborces students to ma£e changes when new situations arise. Most ok aft, /tallows students to ma£e hr lends with 
people who have never heard ' ofj blcinois, A^ter off this is said and done, students are aiso abc^e to ioo£ bac£on aiithe 
incredible sights they hao-e seen while travelfny, whether in Britain or throughout Europe, They return loaded 
with photos and chattering away about ace the peaces they v-e been. 

During, vacations students have ta£en advantage ok every, chance to travel, Sean breather, Junior in CBA currently, 
studyiny at the Of niversity ob warwic£ in Coventry, unhand, too£a nine day trip to the tfor£shire Pates in 
northern Enyland, I am luc£y enouyh to have br lends ob my hamlly who five up there, breather said. They too£me 
into their home and showed me around the town, it was an outstanding time, 

C/rey Tessier and Matt Welnbury, both Juniors in OAS who are currently studying at Dundee Ot niversity, and 
mysecb senior in OAS currently not studyiny very much at the Of niversity ok warwic£, ace too£ an eiyht day 
Journey that brouyht us throuyh Brussels, Amsterdam and then to Munich bor the (7£toberhest celebration. 

ft was nothiny b could Imaylne, k/einbury rebcects on his time in Amsterdam. We too£a boat tour ob the city 
throuyh the canacs. There were a cot ' obslyhts to see. 

The CfermanS were so £indto us when they learned we were international students, sald/essler, rememberiny his 
conversations with natives at D£toberhest, 1 spo£e with a Bavarian hamlly bar hours and really learned au/te a bit 
about Cferman drin£iny customs. 

Students studyiny abroad are able to ta£e short day trips on the wee£endas well. Steven Of nterbranz, Junior in 
TAA currently studyiny at blbewcastie Of niversity, too£a trip to Tdinborouyh, Scotland. I was abce to see the 
medieval: castles there and to visit a hew yood 'pubs as well, said (4 nterbranz. I went with some mates brom my 
British university and had the be$t time. 

Slmliariy, Adnan Bhanpuri Junior in CBA studyiny at the [/(niversity o^fvarwlc£, was abce to see Strat^ord-Ofpon- 
Avon, the birthplace ob wicciam Sha£espeare. The town was so guaint, and 'the historical: slyhts were actually 
pretty informative, Bhanpuri said. I m a business student, but I was stllcabee to appreciate some oft the 
Sha£espearean history, ht was a yreat little trip, 

(4 ok 1 students study in Britain hor various reasons, but all have a cove obtravellny in common. Students return to 
the Of ob I campus refreshed by their experiences, blcledwlth new ideas andperspec tives and they bind it hard not to 
loo£ bac£ and thln£ about ace the places they have been. 



See you soon! 

Timmy Shea 



At the Tower o/f London, Beefeaters yuard 
(li£e the ravens, only dibberent J the Crown 
(Jewels. This particular Beebeater was an 
ex-commando who was decorated bor valour 
and given the prestigious duty, bl/ext to me is 
"uny Shin, senior in CBA. 




Members 

of the 

Illinois 

Quad 

Rugby 

team 

— Darren King 

display intensity 
during a game. These 
members have over- 
come challenges to 
live successfully on 
the XI of I campus. 



Story by 

Jennifer Arendarczyk 

Layout by 
Erin Evans 




42 Student Life 












l#g the 

Wheelchair hcco<& 
l\Aado &aQor on C^mmS 



In the 1940s, the U of I was a pioneer in the area of helping students with 
disabilities. They paved the way for making buildings and other areas more 
accessible. Today, it is a more accessible campus for students with disabilities. 

Jana Stump, sophomore in Agriculture, came from Kansas because "U 
of I had the best accessibility of all the schools I looked at." Stump also 
said the "equipment at Intramural-Physical Education Building (IMPE) 
was very good." There were a variety of sports activities including track 
and field (for locomotor disabilities and visual impairment), wheelchair 
basketball for men and women and QUAD rugby. Stump was a member of 
the women's basketball team. 

Stump did point out some things that needed to be changed. Bathrooms 
were a problem because "they were too small. The ones in Mumford Hall 
could not accommodate my chair," Stump said. Her main complaint had 
to do with the removal of snow. "When it snowed, they did not scoop the 
ramps. They scooped the sidewalk, but then they would move the snow 
onto the curb cuts," added Stump. 

Margaret Stran, senior in LAS, said, "It was never a problem to have a 
class moved if it was not accessible to me." All of her teachers were really 
cooperative and helpful. Stran said one problem "was the lack of desks. 
Most classrooms had no separate desks which could be used." 

One problem both Stran and Stump mentioned was using the tunnels to get 
into Noyes Lab, Chem Annex and Roger Adams Lab. They both brought up 
the fact that the tunnel closed after a particular time. Stran also said that some 
buildings locked their doors that were accessible to wheelchairs. 

Stran and Stump both agreed that the Rehabilitation Education Center 
was very helpful to them. The center housed an area where wheelchair 
repair was done. Stump found this to be very helpful especially when she 
needed minor repairs for her chair. The Rehab center was also an 
information resource to students with regard to accessibility of campus 
buildings. The staff of the Rehab center worked closely with many students 
such as Stran and Stump. 

Students were encouraged to self-advocate and seek accommodations. 
The Rehabilitation Education Center was available as a resource when 
difficulties arose. The center also worked with the Office of Facilities and 
Planning making structural changes to many campus buildings in the 
effort to increase accessibility. 

One unfortunate set back to the center was its location. Being so far 
from the heart of campus, the visibility of the center was lessened. Some 
people did not know it existed. 

There were many changes and improvements made through the efforts 
of the center and the students. The work they did will be felt for the years 
to come. 



A wheelchair ramp slowly descends toward a Fifth Street 
sidewalk outside of the Institute of Labor and Industrial 
Relations building located at 504 E. Armory Ave. in 
Champaign. The Rehabilitation Education Center helped 
make the campus more accessible to wheelchairs. 



Wheelchairs on Campus 43 




One of 

President 

Stanley 

Ikenbeny's 

honors 

came in 

May 1994 

from the 

Illinois 

—File photo 

Humanities Council 
for having "dedicated 
himself to creating a 
world-class univer- 
sity, offering students 
a complete and bal- 
anced education in 
which the humanities 
are valued equally 
with the sciences." 



Story by 
Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 

Layout by 
Colleen Murray 





Stanley Ikenberry is pictured the 
day that he was announced as 
President of the University of 
Illinois in 1979. At the time of 
his appointment, he was the 
youngest president in U of I's 
127-year history. 

Illinois Governor Jim Edgar 
ivalks ivith University President 
Stanley Ikenberry in the Illini 
Union after a Board of Trustees 
meeting in March of 1991. Edgar 
said, "Stan Ikenberry's decision 
to step down will be a loss to the 
University of Illinois. He has 
distinguished himself as an 
outstanding president of the 
world-class University." 




44 Student Life 




epf G 



( h^P" Fro<idonf 



^rd 




— Courtesy of the University Archive 




University President Stanley O. Ikenberry and his wife, Judith, made their final 
appearance in the 1994 homecoming parade. Waving cheerily to the spirited crowds, 
they said good-bye to their honored positions within the administration. "I believe 
the University is ready for new leadership," Ikenberry said. "While I am proud of the 
past, I also believe that an infusion of new ideas, fresh perspectives and enthusiasm 
serves this or any other university well." 

On June 9, 1994, Ikenberry, U of I's fourteenth president, publicly announced his 
decision to pass the position on to a new candidate. Following his monumental 
decision, he wrote a letter to the Board of Trustees asking them to start a search for 
his successor. "Very simply, I believe the health of the University is excellent, that our 
prospects are bright and that we are well positioned to proceed with an orderly 
transition of leadership," Ikenberry said in his letter to the Trustees. 

Ikenberry, 59, served as President since Sept. 1 , 1 979 . At the time of his appointment, 
he was the youngest president in U of I's 127-year history. Some of his greatest 
accomplishments during his sixteen year stint included the ten-fold increase in 
financial gift endowments from alumni and friends from $30 million to $300 million; 
the doubled numbers of minority undergraduate students on the Urbana-Champaign 
campus; the academic initiatives of Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and 
Technology and the National Center for Super-Computing Applications. 

Ikenberry's most lauded initiative was the consolidation of the Chicago campuses to 
create the present-day University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC ) . This action made the largest, 
most comprehensive research university campus in the metropolitan Chicago area. 

Many state, campus and fellow academia had highly complimentary yet bittersweet 
comments about Ikenberry's resignation. Illinois Governor Jim Edgar, an ex officio 
member of the Board of Trustees said, "Stan Ikenberry's decision to step down will 
be a loss to the University of Illinois. He has distinguished himself as an outstanding 
president of the world-class University. He has been a truly valuable citizen of Illinois 
and a valued friend of mine." 

Called "the greatest president in the history of the University," Ikenberry won the 
praise of U of I Trustee Chair Kenneth R. Boyle. "He has a vision of quality and an 
ability to persuade and build consensus that have been quite unusual," Boyle said. 
"He also has a superb knowledge of the political process and an ability to work successfully 
with government leaders in Springfield and Washington on behalf of the University." 

Ikenberry said he would continue to push for public support for the university and 
education in general. He planned to help in an upcoming University of Illinois 
Foundation's campaign to raise private gifts for the school. Ikenberry also planned 
to continue contributing to the university as a professor and scholar in the College of 
Education, possibly in the College of Commerce and in the Institute of Government 
and Public Affairs. 

On a more personal note, Ikenberry wished to express a few warm words. "As we 
tackle this unfinished agenda, Judy and I want to say a special thank you to good 
friends, extraordinary members of the faculty and loyal colleagues who have worked 
with us over the years to create the jewel called the University of Illinois. Whatever 
the future holds, we will not forget them or their support and their contributions." 



-File photo 



Ikenberry 45 



Across the Miles 

Patience, strength, a car and a large cash reserve to pay the phone bill — the four 

big components of a long distance relationship. But do even these ensure success? 

"Sometimes, when I haven't seen him for a long time, I feel like I've dreamed the 

whole thing," said Shannon Huffman, junior in ALS. Huffman and her boyfriend 

Jeff met in high school where they ran for the track team. 

"There is one advantage to this," Huffman said. "We can't be in each other's way 

during a busy week, so work gets done." She added, "But it would be nice to be 

hugged or kissed in the middle of the week, not just on weekends." 

Dallas Sipes, junior in Agriculture, also felt the strain of separation! 
throughout the week. "Sometimes I just need to hear him laugh, so I pick 
up the phone and dial." 
Maintaining a realistic confidence in the security of her long-distance 
relationship was important. "I'm not so naive to think he doesn't see other: 
girls," Sipes said. "It doesn't really bother me because I know how he feels, 
and I can hear the excitement in his voice when we talk." 

Senior in LAS Jeannine Rader, however, could not rely on frequent 
telephone communication with her fiance, Ryan, who 
spent the year studying in Germany. "The hardest part," 
Rader said, "is not having the instant communication--: 
talking about the little things." 

In a relationship which has progressed to a point of 
stability, time apart may actually be beneficial. 

'It allows each of us to grow 

and learn on our own," 

Rader said. "We also 

know 




that 
once 



L l 6 Student Life 





Kick Widmer 



his year is over, we'll 
e free to spend forever 
Dgether! 

Social functions such as 
ances and weddings often 
>ose interesting problems 

/hen that favorite date is ^^ miles 

way. Huffman, Sipes and Rader all would ask friends to 

ccompany them in such unfortunate circumstances. Those 
/ith stricter views on fidelity, however, would not hear of 
uch a transgression. 

"If I needed a date, r/ said Tony Zimmer, junior in Engineering, "my 
irlfriend would come to Champaign. Or, if not, sheTl allow me to go 
/ith a blow-up doll." 

Tony envisioned his long distance relationship ending on a happy 
ote. "It will last through grad school," he said, "and end when 
/e get married." 

These four couples may not be typical, but long distance 
dationships can work. Huffman said, "We've learned 
ow important we are to each other through this 
eparation." While they worked to appreciate each 
ther, the phone companies needed little convincing 
3 appreciate them. 
"Yes," Huffman said, "people 
ke us keep AT&T in 
usiness!" 



'—♦Graphic by 
George Eckart 



Story by Sandie Bass 
Layout by Ryan Almon and Peggy Christensen 



Long Distance Relationships 47 




Forbes 

Fest 

featured 

local 

bands, 

food 

from 

several 

popular campustown 

eateries and a three- 

on-three basketball 

tournament. The 

event was organized 

by Forbes residents 

and, in its second 

year, hopes to 

become an annual 

campus tradition. 



Members of one of the six local 
bands invited to play at Forbes 
Fest perform during the event. Tlie 
participating bands were chosen 
from demo tapes submitted. 

A member of the band Soulstice 
entertains the crowd at Forbes 
Fest. Food from several local 
establishtnents was available to 
hungry listeners. 




inan Hcxkenb.iu«h 




Story by 
Laura Amrein 

Layout by 
Claudia Rodriguez 



48 Student Life 





V r» es W 

I *S Two md Oirow'mz- O \j 

A smaller version of the Taste of Chicago. Eating and hanging out. Right in the 
dorm's own back yard. April 21,1994, marked the second annual Forbes Fest. 
Richard Majka, Forbes' resident director at the time, started this mini-tradition in 
1993. Amy Majka, sophomore in LAS and a Forbes resident, followed in her 
brother's path to help organize the event in 1994. 

"I thought that it was a great idea and I wanted to make sure that the event 
was able to continue after my brother graduated," Majka said. "Starting in 
February, I assisted in the planning and preparation that was necessary to put 
on such a large event. The day of the festival, I worked on staff with thirty other 
residents setting up and cleaning up in addition to making sure that everything 
went smoothly. It was great to see so many people enjoying themselves. I 
know our hard work had paid off when I saw smiles on so many faces." 

John Koo, senior in LAS and resident advisor at Forbes, was in charge of Forbes 
Fest 1 994. Koo, along with ten other residents, began working on April' s event early 
into the Spring 1994 semester. After listening to many demo tapes, the committee 
selected six local bands to play that day: Free Range Chicken, Hurtle, Iconoclast, 
Liquid Kramer, Soulstice and Third Stone. Koo and his team coordinated the food, 
contacting local vendors including Zorbas, Bagelmans and Papa John's. 

The committee handled the situation with foresight, establishing a ticket booth 
because the vendors could not deal in cash transactions. These same expert 
planners designed the t-shirt which was given out free to the participants of the 3- 
on-3 basketball tournament that was to be held that day. 

The tournament was open to all U of I students, but the competition was limited 
to sixteen teams. Heavy advertising attracted students from all over campus to play 
on the blacktop courts at First and Gregory Streets, near Forbes. Each player on the 
first place team received an official NBA basketball while the second and third place 
teams received basketballshorts/Thetournamentofferedsometough competition, 
but my team played hard and it turned out to be a lot of fun," said Mike Reicher, 
sophomore in CBA. "Oh, and the shirt was pretty cool, too." 

The organizers had no intentions of making any profit from their event. "The 
residents of Forbes were not out to make any money when we organized the event. 
Rather, Forbes Fest was an end of the year opportunity for everyone to hang out, 
grab some food and chill while listening to the music that the bands were 
performing," said David Russo, sophomore in LAS. 

After all the people had left, the bands had packed up, and the vendors had 
closed down, the residents of Forbes were already starting to look ahead towards 
next year. "As Forbes Fesfs popularity grows, we would like to expand the event 
and offer new things for our audience," Russo said. "Hopefully next year we will 
add some different people and performances to the event. We would like to get the 
mini Dance Team to perform a show and maybe even get a few local celebrities such 
as athletes from U of I to make appearances at Forbes Fest in 1995." 



-Brian Beckenbau^h 



Forbes Fest 49 



OUR WORLD 
IS IN NEED OF 
CONSTANT CHANGE 



, HIS YEAR, we at the Illio have devoted a section of stories that weigh heavily on 
the students here at the U of I. The section ranges from the Chief Illiniwek debate, 

- to the Greek System, to campus violence, with a little politics mixed in the bunch. 
Our point was not to preach our own personal opinions, but to shed some light on issues 
that affect us all during our stay in the twin cities. 

History has proven that Wars are not won peacefully. People in power don't simply 
give up that power without a fight. Take for instance the first free election held in South 
Africa. Frederick DeKlerk was highly praised for his role in the transition of government. 
But people skip around the fact that the transition took more than 300 years and millions 
of lives. There is a war raging right now between pro-life and pro-choice advocates. Many 
people feel that government has no business being involved, but others say that laws are 
the only way to stop the abortion practices. Remember President Bush's war on drugs? 
There needs to be a war on homelessness. No matter how these people got on the streets, 
taxpayers wind up taking care of them. So whose job is it to help these people become self- 
sufficient - ours or theirs? 

As college students we all face internal battles. Expressing homosexuality is just one 
example of a hard decision for university students. It does not matter whether you think 
it is a choice or you think people are born this way. Coming out isn't always the easiest 
thing to do. 

This is the first time that many of us have been on our own. University life is unique 
in that it gives us a taste of the responsibilities involved with the real world, while still 
giving us a safety net to fall back on. No one is here telling us to get up or clean our room. 
We can party as long as we want to without curfews, and many of us find relationships that 
are much deeper and go much farther than they ever did in high school. The minute we step 
on to this campus, there is a change in all of us. This is the first step through the hallway 
of life that leads to true adulthood. 

Throughout the history of humankind, there have been controversies big and small. 
Wars, fallen governments, peace treaties and new countries have all grown out of some 
kind of conflict. It becomes really easy to give up on the things you believe in when 
progress seems to take too long, or no one seems to understand how deep the issue really 
is for you. Granted, the people who leave the U of I with or without degrees are not the same 
people who started here. This is what makes the time line move on; this is what makes the 
degrees of change. 

— Story by Toi Michelle Walker and Photo Illustration by Rick Widmer 



BUT WHAT 

DEGREE OF CHANGE 

SHOULD WE MAKE? 



FIGHTING ILLINI 

THE CHIEF CONTROVERSY RAGES ON 



, HE CHIEF. He can be portrayed as derogatory or awe-inspiring, an insult or a compliment, 
a problem or a solution. Ever since 1990, when the debate began at the U of I, Chief Illiniwek's 

- future was put on the stand. This debate revolved around whether or not the Chief should remain 
the school's sports mascot and symbol. Should he remain an impressive symbol, or should this 
stereotypical figure be removed and replaced? The U of I campus is torn. 

Chief Illiniwek performs only at the halftime of football and basketball games. His presence is 
often greeted with shouts and cheers. Rob Penington, senior in LAS, said, "The Chief sends chills 
down your spine sometimes when he dances. He's a noble representation for the team." 

His halftime dance is not always viewed with such respect and awe. "It's an insult. It's some 
white frat boy jumping around on the field. The Chief is not representative of the university," stated 
Monique Sampson, graduate student in LAS. 

Some students believe the removal of the Chief at the football and basketball games would be 
beneficial. "Is it really important? Does it change your feelings about the game? If the Chief offends, 
I don't think it's that important to keep him," said Elaine Richardson, senior in Communications and 
Editor in Chief of the Daily Mini. 

/ Paul Satterthwaite, senior in LAS, agreed. "Although I'm not personally offended, we should 
take away the symbol if it obviously offends others," Satterthwaite said. Satterthwaite compared the 
Chief dancing at halftime to a "dancing Jew in front of a crowd of Nazis." 

The portrayal of a Native American on T-shirts, jackets and other items is not as offensive to 
some students. Though many agree that the picture is not a realistic portrayal, it should be kept on U 
of I paraphernalia. "If you can't go to the games, you can still show support for the school," said Julie 
Rodriguez, junior in Agriculture. Rodriguez supports the Chief because he is "looked on with 
reverence. We chose to use this symbol. It's a compliment." 

Is it, or is Chief Illiniwek' s depiction an insult? Antonio Rodriguez is a graduate student in Education 
and member of the Native American Student Organization (NASO) which is the only Native American 
group on campus. NASO is anti-Chief and also pro-Native American. Rodriguez said, "The Chief is a 
stereotypic depiction of Native Americans. It doesn't reflect reality." Antonio Rodriguez also believes the 
Chief should not be depicted anywhere - from car window stickers to folders. 

Christopher Ramirez, senior in FAA, was a member of the Council on Undergraduate Education 
(CUE) Inclusivity Committee. This was a committee that worked under the Chancellor during the 
1993-1994 school year. Ramirez stated, "There are few Native Americans on campus and there are 
no Native American programs [at the U of I] - that's more of an insult than the Chief. There are other 
issues that could be addressed by Native Americans, such as alcoholism." 

What can be done to alleviate the problem of this awesome figure which is at the same time 
derogatory to Native Americans? "The symbol itself is not bad," said Jennifer Cuasay , senior in LAS and 
President of the Illini Union Board. "If it offends, though, maybe we should consider another symbol." 
Cuasay also believes the students and alumni should decide the issue, and politicians should stay out of it. 

A replacement for the Chief is a whole other problem in itself. Bringing in a new symbol to the 
U of I may create more problems than we already have. Alternatives such as "Orange Crush" or the 
large "I" may alleviate the Chief problems, but would the students and alumni be truly happy? "No 
matter what you got, it would be a joke. The Chief portrays Native Americans artistically," said 
Peningtori. Tony Hunter, senior in LAS, agreed. "It may not be received well, but [the Chief] is 
intended as a Compliment," Hunter said. 

Some students and faculty believe Chief Illiniwek will not remain at the U of I much longer. If 
he stays, the tension will continue. If he is removed, a new and possibly problematic mascot may come 
to take his place. Until the decision is made, Chief Illiniwek will be our mascot and symbol for the 
proud and determined Fighting Illini. 



STORY BY AMARA R OZGUS & LAYO UT BY RYAN ALMON 
PHOTO BY RICK WIDMER 



*^^ 



iV* 



\ 




LIFE ON THE STREETS 

HOMELESS FIGHTING HOMELESSNESS 



T LEAST one homeless person living on the streets of Champaign has loftier plans than 

I panhandling enough money to buy her next meal or purchase her next pack of cigarettes. 

" Jane Doe, a homeless person who would like to remain anonymous, currently lives on the 
streets of Champaign and has plans to get a job and save enough money to rent an apartment. Unlike 
many of the other familiar faces that Champaign residents often find panhandling on the campus of 
the University of Illinois, Doe has looked beyond her current homeless situation to where she wants 
to be and how she is going to get there. 

Doe, a 30-year-old native of Michigan, found herself on the street two-and-a-half months ago 
after being kicked out of her house by her alcohol- and drug-addicted husband. "I can't stand living 
on the streets like this," said Doe as she smoked a cigarette. "I've never been homeless before now, 
and I'm never going to be homeless again!" 

Doe's attitude is one of the exceptions to the vast majority of the panhandlers on Green Street 
attitudes. "They are happy with it!" explained Doe as a look of amazement came over her dirty face. 
"They probably won't tell you, but they tell me that they are satisfied with what they are doing. Most 
of them have been out here for over five or six years and they do it every day." 

One homeless man, who can often be found sitting in front of Skylight Court Apartments on 
Green St. with a look of contentment on his face, is 44-year-old Maurice Akins. Akins, a 1973 
graduate from the University of Illinois, claims he now enjoys walking the streets of Champaign even 
more than he did as an undergraduate student. "The University of Illinois is one of the best universities 
in the country," said Akins as he took a drink out of his half-empty bottle of vodka. "What I love about 
this place, and always will love, is that we work hard, and we party hard." 

Holding a degree in advertising from the College of Communications, Akins moved to Chicago 
and worked for a variety of different advertising companies. His dreams of being a publisher were 
dashed when a magazine he developed for young black professional men was unsuccessful. 

Akin's frustration with the failure of his magazine combined with his depression after the 
death of his father caused him to stop caring about leading a 'successful' life. His frustrations 
with his situation led to drinking. "I am an alcoholic," said Akins, "but I was an alcoholic when 
I was still achieving." 

Akins no longer works to support his alcoholism. Instead, he has turned to panhandling to help 
satisfy his addiction. "Maurice loves it out here on the streets," said Doe. "If I made half as much 
money as some of these guys do, I would probably be out here everyday, also." 

Although Doe admits to once having been an alcoholic, she claims she has managed to stay away 
from the bottle since becoming homeless. "The only thing that I spend my money on these days is a 
pack of cigarettes, a pop and something to eat," said Doe. 

Doe insisted that she did not consider herself a panhandler. "I don't panhandle," said Doe. "I 
just try to get me something to eat." According to Doe, most panhandlers can make more than $50 
a day while she just gets enough money to survive. "They are supplying a drug habit," said Doe. "I 
am just trying to get me something to eat!" 

Doe was also frustrated that since being out on the streets of Champaign, she has been 
unsuccessful at finding a place to sleep at one of the local shelters. "Unlike most of these guys, I didn't 
choose to be out here," said Doe. "I had an old man who threw me out, and now here I am. It's not 
right that these guys abuse the system the way they do. I call the shelters everyday, but there is no room 
in any of them because it is getting so cold out." There are three shelters available in Champaign for 
homeless women to stay at, the Women's Emergency Shelter on Church St., A Woman's Place on 
Green St. and the Catholic Worker House on Randolph St. All of them are currently full. "I can't get 
in unless they have room, and they don't have any room right now," said Doe. "I am the first one in 
as soon as someone leaves (the Women's Emergency Shelter)." 

Doebelieved that a lot of the people that are on the street are satisfied with their situation because 
he only lifestyle they know. "If any of them put their mind to it, they could get out of their 
jn, ' said Doe. "Their used to it, though, and evidently, they like it." 

liter ontythree months on the streets, Doe says that she is far from used to it. "I have too 
to live for to live a life like this," said Doe. "I have my kids to get back to. I have a life 




Through three different marriages plagued with abuse and infidelity, Doe has lost all four 
of her children. She hopes that after getting her life back on track, she can regain custody of her 
three youngest boys. Although she admitted that it would be difficult, a determined look in her 
eyes was apparent as she described her weekly visits with her sons at a local orphanage. Doe Has 
already made an agreement with a man to rent a trailer for $235 a month. She planned to move 
into it by the end of 1994. 

While Doe has come up with a plan to fight her homelessness, many campustown panhandlers 
are at one of two extremes. They are either happy with their current lifestyle or are overwhelmed by 
the prospect of pulling themselves out of their homelessness. "I can't see myself ten days from now," 
said Craig. "I just don't know where my life is headed. 

Doe, on the other hand knows exactly what she plans to do to get her life back on track. "Where 
am I going?" said Doe with a look of intensity in her eyes and glint of determination in her voice. "I 
am going to Manpower tomorrow and I know they will put me at Plastipak, and I'm going to get me 
a damn good job, and I'm going to get off these damn streets, that's where I see myself going. I can't 
stand being homeless." 



STORY & L AYOUT BY RY AN ALMON 
PHOTO BY RICK WIDMER 



LETTERS OF DEBATE 

WEIGHING PROS AND CONS OF THE GREEK SYSTEM 



j 'HEN STUDENTS choose a large university, they are faced with the option of whether or 
' f. not to get involved on campus as well as at the community level. There is no right or wrong 
answer to this decision, but everyone faces this situation when they enter the U of I. Since the U 
of Ts Urbana-Champaign campus has the largest Greek system in the nation, a major form of campus 
interaction may involve joining a fraternity or a sorority. 

There are over 40 fraternities and more than 20 sororities which allow a student to find a house that best 
fits his or her personality. Some Greeks feel that they are stereotyped by their letters while non-Greek 
members feel the Greek system does not allow for individuality. Unfortunately, this one decision has caused 
a battle on campus between the non-Greek members and those who support the Greek system. 

Words such as "brotherhood" and "pledge sister" show that the Greek members do not just consider 
themselves an organization, but see themselves as a family. Fraternities and sororities allow people to meet 
others and establish lasting friendships . For people who want to meet others , the Greek system offers an active 
social life. With activities from the Barn Dances for the whole house to Pledge Dances for just the new 
members, the Greek system helps students experience the social aspect at the U of I. 

However, some view the Greek system as a way of buying friends. "I feel that it is a good social life," 
said Laura Godwin, senior in Education. "It provides social activities and a strong support group. However, 
in my opinion, I feel it is an expensive clique that hinders individuality and independence." 

The Greek system encourages social activities, but it can hinder sorority or fraternity members from 
socializing with others outside of their house. It can also alienate those who do not participate in the Greek 
system. "I feel that the Greek system is good for people who come down here and need to find friends. 
However, it limits people from expanding their social horizons because people in fraternities and sororities 
tend to only socialize with people within their house," said Mike Macellaio, senior in LAS. 

The Greek system becomes a way to stereotype people. Students, even other Greek members, tend to 
judge people on their letters. "One major weakness of the Greek system is misinterpretation," said Cliff 
Peterson, junior in Agriculture and Vice President of Alpha Gamma Rho. "Many people label you based on 
the letters that you wear." 

The Greek letters give people a way to label others for identification purposes. The letters can inhibit 
outsiders from associating with Greek members and it can also prohibit Greek members from meeting people 
outside of their house. According to Peterson, "To the critics of the Greek system, I would say that they need 
to judge based on the system as a whole and not on houses individually. Some people don't represent the system 
in a positive way, and this is unfortunate. However, people must give the Greek system a little more credit." 

The Greek system does not offer the only social opportunities at the U of I, but it is a way to meet others. 
"The most visible strength of the Greek system is the social opportunities that it offers," said Aveen 
MacAntee, senior in LAS and president of Delta Zeta sorority. "However, the Greek system goes beyond 
the social aspect. It offers leadership and involvement for people both at the chapter level as well as the 
Panhellenic Council and Interfraternity Council. Also, it is good for the community because the combined 
effort of the Greek system raises money for the local community." 

The Greek system is responsible for many beneficial activities on campus such as the Homecoming 
Parade. Greek members also participate in community projects such as Order of Omega (a community clean- 
up project) and philanthropy associated with certain houses. One must remember that non-Greek members 
can get involved in projects that will also benefit the community and campus. 

As in all situations, there are pros and cons to the Greek system. Whether a student views it as beneficial 
or as a way to buy friends depends on the person. Non-Greek students see that there is a social life outside 
of the Greek system. Greek members know that others will have a stereotypical view of them and that people 
will judge them based on the letters they wear. The letters can inhibit outsiders from associating with Greek 
members, but it can also prohibit Greek members from meeting people outside of their house. To overcome 
this barrier, non-Greek members must not stereotype the Greek system and the Greek members must realize 
that life does exist outside of their house. 



STORY BY COLLEEN CHR ISTENSEN & L AYOUT BY RYAN ALMON 
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY RICK WIDMER 




Jl:* 










~* — ~ 




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7* H^t 






" a* Jr ^ 





/ 




CAMPUS CRIME 

STUDENTS FACE DAILY VIOLENCE 



' EX, DRUGS and rock & roll. The potential for campus crime just starts there. "We have a 

youthful population in the area, and youthful folks tend to put themselves in harm's way 

more often than older people," said University Police Captain Frederick Kallmayer. Alcohol, 
fake IDs, apartment-hunting pitfalls, hate crimes, sexual assault and robberies all hit the top of 
the list of common college violence. Several of these topics were pertinent enough to fill 
the chapters of a recently released book titled Crime at College: The Student Guide to 
Personal Safety. 

In the case of sexual assault, the authors, a former policeman and a former crime beat 
reporter, advise readers to report the incident to the police and not to disturb the scene. They also 
advised victims not to bathe, shower or douche, to get medical attention immediately, find a 
friend for support and seek counseling. 

At U of I, numerous committees and student support groups combat the issue of violence 
against women. These groups do not simply focus on campus incidents. "Violence on campus 
is not an isolated problem. It's part of a societal problem," said Maria Silva, a program 
coordinator at the campus YWCA involved with many university activities concerning violence 
against women. 

Crime at College also ranked the nation's 467 largest four-year colleges and universities 
based on 1992 Crime by County records from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The U of I's 
Urbana-Champaign campus fared well in its 203rd ranking, earning a "B" grade. The book's 
report determined an average of 5.62 crimes for every 100 people at the university. 

Supporting the average is the fact that as of mid-October of the 1994-1995 school year, 
there were reports of only three robberies committed on campus property. Compare this to last 
year's report of four robberies on campus. Then compare it to 21 1 armed robberies as of October 
1994, as opposed to 210 during all of 1993, within the entire Champaign-Urbana area. The 
bottom line? Statistically, the college campus serves as the safest oasis within the area, 
according to Kallmayer. 

In contrast, Champaign Police Crime Analyst Gary Spear said that Campustown was one 
of the most targeted sites for armed robberies. That explained a Champaign City Council 
funding approval for a police foot patrol to be implemented after late October. The fully-armed, 
uniformed officers patrolled their beats during daytime and evening hours. The new campustown 
beat covered the Green Street corridor, west of the U of I. The University Police typically assign 
five of their own to patrol school property at any one time. 

Kallmayer advised students simply to avoid dangerous situations and to remain alert 
around the campus. "Students should be aware that they are in an at-risk population in an area 
that has a history of this kind of problem," Kallmayer said. 

The at-risk area had spread to university residence halls by this time of the school year as well. 
A sudden string of residence hall burglaries prompted University Police to extend their policing beats 
to certain halls as of Oct. 11, 1994. Two police officers extended their work as liaisons, educators, 
complaint takers and report filers within university housing. One took a station at Florida and 
Pennsylvania Avenue residence halls and another at Peabody and Gregory Drive halls. 

"The design is solid, the theory is solid - everything points to the value of the community 
policing program," said Director of Housing George Shoffner. 



STORY BY CHUAN-LIN ALI CE TSAI & LAY OUT BY MONICA SOLTESZ 
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY RICK WIDMER 



DEBATING LIFE 

* RE THE PROTESTS GOING TOO FAR? 



ccording to current law in this country, a woman has a right to end a first trimester pregnancy. 
Regardless of her reasons, the Supreme Court ruled that a woman has the constitutional right 

^ to make her own decisions about her reproductive system. It has now been over 20 years since 
the Supreme Court handed down the famous decision in Roe vs. Wade in 1973 legalizing 
abortion. The woman who went to court ended up giving up her child for adoption since the 
decision was rendered well after her first trimester, which is what many pro-lifers advocated 
instead of ending a pregnancy. 

Abortion is something that touches college men and women very deeply on the this 
campus. Since the outbreak of AIDS and a host of other sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted 
babies ironically seem to be the nicest thing that can happen to you when you have unprotected 
sex. Sadly, many people still play with fire regarding their sexual behavior. The fact remains that 
there are too many young girls and women becoming pregnant with babies they either do not 
want or cannot take care of properly. As of now, abortion, as well as adoption and keeping the 
baby, is still an option for these women. 

"My religious beliefs say that abortion is wrong, but I believe that God gave people a mind 
to make their own decisions," said Bridgette Williams, senior in LAS. "But when your beliefs 
become physically harmful to someone else, you know you've gone too far." 

East Central Illinois is definitely not immune to the violence of the anti-abortion senti- 
ments that are sweeping the country. Although the protesters here in Champaign and Urbana 
have been very peaceful, there was a bombing in a Decatur clinic two years ago. 

"I think that the violence is overshadowing the fact that women should have their own 
choice," said Jodi Ferlin, freshmen in CB A. "The protests against abortion are becoming really 
exaggerated now." 

As the debate between pro-life and pro-choice rages on in the courts and the media, the 
front lines of the struggle have taken a darker turn. Doctors who offer abortions are now losing 
their lives and their families are being subjected to harassment at levels previously unseen. 
Years ago, women who did not want to be pregnant endured the butchers on back alley card 
tables and hangers, or made up poisonous concoctions designed to kill fetuses which very often 
killed the women as well. It was for these women that Roe vs. Wade was first instituted. 

Everyone has a constitutional right to protest any law that they feel is unjust or wrong. Dr. 
Martin Luther King, Jr. eloquently stated that we have a moral obligation to disobey immoral 
laws during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Unlike the nonviolent edge to the protests 
of the sixties, abortion clinics are being bombed and the doctors who provide abortions are being 
shot to death. 

Regardless of your stance on when life truly begins, do these violent protesters have a right 
to end what they call killing by murder? Do those means really justify the ends? Is violence 
protected by the First Amendment? 

"I think that they have a right to their own opinion but when they start taking other people' s 
lives, they are doing exactly what they say they are opposing. They are hypocrites!" said 
Meredith Reaves, sophomore in LAS. 

It might be useful to sit and think about just where you stand on the issue. Whether you are 
pro-life or pro-choice, there are legal as well as peaceful ways to get your point across. In either 
case, the violence must end. 



STORY BY TOI MICHELL E WALKER & L AYOUT BY RYAN ALMON 

PHOTO BY JOEL RENNICH 






COMING OUT 

A WHOLE NEW WORLD OUTSIDE THE CLOSET 



NE MAN attempted suicide out of lack of self-worth. His life had changed from "normal" 
i ever since fifth grade when he realized he was "different." He never fit in with the other guys 
and was not interested in competitive sports. Instead, he liked to read. He had a lot of female 
friends, but he liked males or wanted to at least be near them. By junior high school, the "liking" 
developed into a sexual inclination toward others of the same sex. This was not the way it was 
supposed to be. The norm in society was that little boys liked little girls, and then they grew up to be 
daddies and mommies. Everyone knew that. Then there was the issue with his church. Of all religions, 
he was Catholic, which is one of the most outspoken churches pertaining to its conservative stance 
on homosexuality. So when he realized the name for his "condition" was "gay," a truckload of 
negative spiritual and societal connotations mowed him down. He decided to take his own life. When 
that did not succeed, he had to confess to the most heinous sin: he was gay. 

Not all "coming out" stories are so dramatic. In fact, many are positive, contributing to an 
optimistically growing trend as society becomes familiarized with the concept of homosexuality . The 
first stage in the lifelong process and change in lifestyle after coming out is the self-realization. Many 
sense their own separation from others at an early age. 

"I have always known something was different since kindergarten, but I never put a title to it," 
said Zach Haffey, sophomore in FAA and vice-president of Spectrum, a campus gay/lesbian student 
support group. Haffey said his parents had never taught him about "inverted sexuality," but they had 
never shunned homosexuals. Instead, he only knew instinctively that something was different. After 
experiencing required showers for sixth grade gym class, he admitted it to himself. Thinking back, 
Haffey said, "Yes, I think I'm gay." Haffey remained concealed from others until his freshman year 
of college. Up until then, he did not know anyone else who was openly gay. He chose to tell a friend 
who he thought was straight first. He later said telling someone who was straight was harder than 
telling one who was gay. As it turned out, the friend then revealed to him that she was bisexual. But, 
at least, he had overly prepared with the mental preparation of telling a straight person beforehand. 
After this, "outing" to other friends, his mother and his sister came easier. 

Coming out is, of course, unique for everyone. "There are as many ways as there are people," 
said John Spears, senior in LAS. Spears, who called himself "very out," said he "outed" himself to 
his acquaintances at whatever point in their relationship he felt was necessary to avoid deceiving 
them. Spears used his public speaking skills to encourage other homosexuals to come out of the closet. 
He likened it to a positive "vicious circle" - the more people who come out, the better. "The more 
people that come out, that survive and make something of themselves, the easier it will be for others 
to come out. And it will just build and build and then it won't matter," Spears said. Spears argued that 
closeted homosexuals detract from the cause of their peers. "Those in the closet, who go to C Street 
and date around, who try to have a foot in both worlds , who do not want to face who they are, are looked 
down upon in the gay community," Spears said. Another reason to come out is that it makes 
homosexual relationships easier. "It's hard to date around when you're still in the closet. When you 
have a [homosexual] relationship, you have to lie," Spears said. 

As the acceptance level of society increases, coming out grows easier. And, according to 
Spears, the U of I presented a particularly accepting and comfortable environment. "Homosexu- 
als are a government protected class in Champaign-Urbana, and homosexual couples enjoy the 
same rights as married straight couples at the university," Spears said. He added,"U of I is, by 
far, the exception and not the rule. I wish gays and lesbians knew how good they have it here 
before they go out into the real world." 



STORY BY CHUAN-LIN ALI CE TSAI & LAY OUT BY MONICA SOLTESZ 
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY RICK WIDMER 



FREE AT LAST , 

CITIZENS OF SOUTH AFRICA ELECT A NEW LEADER 



N APRIL 26, 1994, South Africa began its process of renewal and reconciliation as the 
country began the long-awaited election that everyone knew Nelson Mandela of the 
African National Congress (ANC) would win. This election marked the first time in 342 
years, since the arrival of the Dutch, that South Africa held a free election with the participation of 
all of its citizens. Until now, five million Whites have controlled 35 million Blacks. "It's about time 
this happened. It's just a shame that it took so long for someone Black to run their own country," said 
Ay anna Garrett, senior in Communications. 

The election, originally scheduled for April 26-28, had to be extended because officials were 
unprepared for the millions of people who came to vote. As a result, there were severe ballot shortages in 
some polling areas. At some polling stations, there was no electricity to run them, while other stations ran 
out of the invisible ink that was stamped onto voters' hands so they could only vote once. In some places 
ballots never arrived. One truck carrying voting supplies was hijacked in Katlehong. 

At 7 a.m. on April 26, Nelson Mandela, age 75, cast the first ballot of his life in a simple brown 
box in Durban. "We have moved from an era of pessimism, division and limited opportunities. We 
are starting a new era of hope, of reconciliation, of nation-building," said Mandela, as reported by 
the Associated Press. There were lines up to a mile long in some areas as people who had never voted 
before stood and waited. Some were carried there in wheel barrows while others were carried by 
younger, stronger members of their families. The first day was reserved for the handicapped and 
elderly voters, but by the third day everyone was allowed to cast their ballots. 

People in the United States were allowed to vote by absentee ballot in three cities. There are South 
African Consulate offices in Beverly Hills, Chicago and New York City. The vote was extended to Friday 
at midnight, and the votes were being counted by 6 a.m. Saturday morning, April 29. 

When the ANC was announced as the victor, supporters shrieked with joy in a hotel room in 
Johanesburg which was draped with green, black and gold, the colors of the ANC. The celebration 
spilled out into the streets and in the Black districts of Soweto and Alexandria where people were 
yelling, laughing and waving Mandela flags. "For Mandela to even accept the hand of his imprisoners 
as friends shows how much compassion Mandela has for his country. The man spent 27 years in 
prison and is still able to hold hands with the government who imprisoned him. It is just amazing. 
He has really shown the world one more time the strength of African people no matter what the 
hardship," said Paul Hutchinson, senior in Engineering. 

Although the vote is a historic event, South Africa still has a very long way to go. Many people have 
many different expectations for this newly emerging country. "I don't believe that he's really going to be 
able to make any significant changes. They just knew that all hell would break lose if they didn't put him 
in that position," said graduate student LaTacia Morgan. 

Mandela has been reported as saying he wants to bring electricity and decent housing to the 
homelands. He also wants to redistribute the wealth to all people, because millions of Blacks had their land 
stolen from them by the government and given to the White farmers. As a result, millions of people have 
lived in poverty for generations. The new government must also write a new constitution which includes 
everyone for the first time. Most of all, the country must begin the healing process to try to reverse some 
of the wrortgs done by an inhumane system called Apartheid. It will take years and possibly generations 
to correct all of the damage done by a three century old system of hate. 

All in all, the country is off to a good start. In our lifetime a momentous event happened that is sure 
to affect the rest of world history. On May 10, 1994, a former political prisoner who spent 27 years in jail 
was sworn in as president of a country to which he dedicated his life. Time magazine quoted Mandela as 
saying, "I stand before you filled with deep pride and joy - pride in the ordinary, humble people of this 
country. You have shown such a calm, patient determination to reclaim this country as your own. And joy 
that we can loudly proclaim from the rooftops - FREE AT LAST!" 



STORY BY TOI MICHELLE WA LKER & LAYO UT BY PEGGY CHRISTENSEN 
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY RICK WIDMER 




A* 



Sfadoy&c, Spe-Kiol Time 
WrHi Uoal Yo\rth 




Students often find themselves working with children during their 
college years. Some are looking for extra money while others are looking 
for experience that might aid in their future career. 

Professors of education and current teachers have realized that classrooms 
do not always prepare education majors for what the "real world" is like. 
Having students and classrooms of their own, recent education graduates 
were amazed to find that neither a classroom nor a student functions 
textbook-style. 

To compensate for this, colleges and universities have incorporated 
hands-on experiences for the educators of tomorrow. The schools also 
encouraged their scholars to work or volunteer where they could interact 
with youths. 

Sue Nejman, junior in Agriculture, worked closely with children aged 
birth to three. She worked at the Child Development Lab (CDL) to fulfill 
the requirements for a class. The lab gave Nejman the opportunity to put 
into practice what she had learned . "I prepared lesson plans and two weeks 
of activities for the children," Nejman said. "I also planned and conducted 
parent /teacher conferences," Nejman added. 

Nejman obtained valuable hands-on experience that many former 
education students may have missed. CDL also provided other students 
with the opportunity to work with children before entering the job world. 
CDL provided undergraduate and graduate students opportunities to 
personally deal with the children. The lab had approximately 96 children 
ranging in ages from two to five years. 

During the course of a semester, education majors observed these 
children for classes. They also taught and planned activities for the 
children in preparation for the jobs they would someday have. The lab also 
provided a place for research projects to be conducted. Students were able 
to use these youths as subjects for their projects. 

Maggie Duffy, junior in Education, found a different way to interact 
with children. Duffy babysat during the school year. She felt that her 
"classes helped me to know how to treat the children." This also provided 
her with an experience students do not get by being in a classroom. 

M ikkel Storaasli, junior in Education, came in contact with the younger 
generation in the Fall of 1994. Storaasli observed in a school in Mahomet. 
Storaasli said that his contact with students started late in his education. "It 
would have been nice if we could have interacted earlier with the children," 
Storaasli stated. He agreed that his previous classes were very helpful 
when the time came for him to work more closely with the children. 



Anand Menezes, senior in LAS, leads Cory, 
Christopher, Athena and Jonathan in a game 
of "follow the leader" outside of the Child 
Development Lab. This'lab has 96 children 
ranging in age from two to five years old. 





66 Student Life 




Ryan Donovan 



Christo- 
pher 
slides 
down the 
slide 
while 
Cory 
prepares 
for his turn in the 
playground of the 
Child Development 
Laboratory (CDL). 
CDL provides stu- 
dents with the oppor- 
tunity to work with 
children before enter- 
ing the work force. 




-Ryan Donman 



Story by 
Jennifer 
Arendarczyk 



W* 



Layout by 
Peggy Christensen 



Working with Children 67 




^lpal 






A Marathon of ^and^ 



On Friday, Sept. 23, 1994, about one thousand people paid $4 at the doors 
of Foellinger Auditorium to see a celebration of local performers and to benefit 
the Josh Gottheil Fund for Lymphoma Research. Bands that played included 
the 10-Year-Olds Who Have A Nirvana Cover, Soulstice, Moon Seven Times, 
Jambu River and Bludgers. 

Sean Smyth, Music Director at WPGU and senior in LAS, conceived the 
idea behind the event. He had an interest in Champaign-Urbana local bands 
and wanted to showcase them. Localpalooza, his brain child, was a testament 
to Josh Gottheil, an independent promoter who specialized in local events. 
Gottheil's career was cut short when he died in 1 989, just short of his twentieth 
birthday. 

"I was dismayed by the fact that no one seemed to do anything with local 
bands, as far as get them together and show them off," Smyth said. "Fred 
Gottheil [father of Josh and professor of Economics] pointed out that 
Localpalooza might be a good way to tie in lymphoma research, and that 
made sense to me. My job is not to make money for the station, my job is to play 
good music on it. It would be great if we could combine the causes." 

The concert brought in about $2480, leaving $1600 after cost for the fund. It 
also provided an avenue for local talent exposure, particularly in the case of 
the Nirvana Cover band, two members of which were indeed 1 years old. The 
group had performed a year earlier at the Blind Pig, a local bar and dance club. 
"They were really neat and talented," said Jethandelyn Morales, Director of 
Marketing and Promotion at WPGU, the student radio station which helped 
raise funds for this event. "It's good to see them channeling their talent 
towards music and not something destructive." 

All of the bands participated with a strong consciousness of Smyth's goal 
of a "local spirit." The members of Moon Seven Times had been good friends 
of Gottheil. He had helped get them started, "so this was more of a tribute to 
him," Morales said. "They really cooperated with us." 

In order that associations of the event honor Gottheil, Smyth worked to 
avoid any commercialism in connection with Localpalooza. Local bar Kam's 
was the only sponsor. Although some flyers did find their way to the Quad, 
WPGU relied mainly upon the local bars, word of mouth and the popularity 
of the bands for publicity. 

Star Course, a student organization which organized and booked bands for 
various concerts on campus, helped out at the Auditorium. "The show 
seemed to go pretty well," said Andy Scoriggine, senior in LAS, Star Course 
member and usher for Localpalooza. "I didn't get to see most of the bands, but 
I could tell that most of the floor was full." 

"It was a long event, but it seemed that people came for the bands they 
liked," Smyth said. "Every band had an audience for it. The response was 
great, and it helped gain recognition for the bands. I wish we could have a 
Localpalooza every week." 




Moon Seven Times Bassist Don 
Gerard accompanies his band 
during their performance at 
Foellinger Auditorium. It was 
estimated that approxiamately 
1000 people attended the benefit 
concert. 





68 Student Life 



Brandon 
T. Wash- 
ington, 
lead 

singer of 
the band 
Soulstice, 
performs 
at 

Localpalooza. The 
event was held to 
benefit the Josh 
Gottheil Fund for 
Lymphoma Research. 




Ryan Donovan 



Story by 
Vida Riskus 

Layout by 
Colleen Murray 



Localpalooza 69 




The 
Court- 
yard 
Cafe 
offers 
food service for the 
students' convenience 
which includes fresh 
baked goods, coffee 
and other refresh- 
ments and snacks. 



Story by 

Jennifer Arendarczyk 

Layout by 
Robert Young 




70 Student Life 



faff**** C ft f p 



Stejlglrte 



Graduate students Sang Woo Lee, 
Wook Kim andDaegyu Park take 
ome time out to chat and get 
omething to drink at the new 
llini Union Courtyard Cafe. The 
ratio was the site of many all- 
ampus events. 




Returning students noticed a change in the Illini Union. The mass of 
construction in the building's first floor courtyard gave way to an enclosed 
commons area. The Courtyard Cafe opened in Fall of 1994. It houses tables, 
a stage and a food court. 

In its first few weeks, the clean, skylit environment, accompanied by 
the smell of flavored coffee and soothing background music, attracted 
quite a crowd. The high, windowed ceiling and bi-leveled seating added 
to the open atmosphere. 

Plans for this central spot were brought up in 1 990. In 1 991 , the project 
was approved by the Illini Union Board. The patio opened to give students 
a place to study, relax or be entertained. In August of 1994, the group 
Soulstice played as a preview of what was to come, such as other bands and 
even a comedian to amuse the U of I population. 

Nikki Kolaz, coordinator for the patio, worked to get other bands, 
debates and activities to the spot. There was also talk of adding dart boards. 

Jennifer Cuasay, senior in LAS, said, "It provided a better atmosphere 
for concerts and bands" which she "hoped would draw more students in." 

Accessibility was an important feature in the Courtyard Cafe's 
design. Students were relieved to find no minimum age to enter the 
hangout, unlike the campus bars where the entrance age is 19. Another 
innovation of the patio was its focus on providing an area specifically 
for student organizations. The premises were not available for 
reservation by outside groups. 

When the patio was not reserved, however, its popularity did 
cause one problem. "There are not enough tables in the place," said 
Sherri Dale, junior in Agriculture. "I go there to buy food and am 
unable to sit because it is always crowded." 

Jenny Carlson, sophomore in LAS, agreed that it was often crowded, 
but she "enjoyed the music and the skylights. It was a nice atmosphere 
to study in." 

Many other students must have felt the same way as evidenced by 
the people who kept coming back all the time. Must have been those 
beautiful skylights. 



Ramey Drubin, sophomore in 
Engineering, and Sarah Jenkins, 
junior in LAS, study at the 
Courtyard Cafe. It first opened in 
August of 1994. 



—John Hanson 



Union Patio 71 



Take **&£&* NicrU 

Imagine a world where all women and children can walk down the streets at any 
time of the day or night, fearless of any form of sexual harassment or assault. For one 
night each year, this dream comes true for the Champaign-Urbana community, as 
well as many other places across the globe. 

At U of I, the event was called Take Back the Night, organized by a coalition of campus 
and community groups involved with sexual assault and women's issues. Purposefully 
set in April, National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Take Back the Night provided a 
rally of speakers on pertinent issues. Then rally attendants took their cause to the streets, 
literally marching around campus and strengthened by their numbers and purpose. 

"The purpose is twofold: one, it's a way for people in the community who have 
concerns about safety in the streets, especially concerning sexual assault, to feel a 
sense of self -empowerment, and, secondly, it raises the awareness of the community 
to sexual assault," said Pat Morey, coordinator of the Office of Women's Programs 
and member of the Take Back the Night planning committee. 

In the spring of 1994, the event took place on April 29. Speakers and participants 
gathered at the Krannert Center Amphitheater from 7:30 until 8:00 p.m. Under an 
increasingly star-filled sky, the crowd of nearly 500 people listened to the ideals of 
various speakers. The voices came from Panhellenic committees, Rape Crisis Services 
and sexual assault survivors. 

In addition, sexual assault issues took a multicultural twist with speakers from 
SHAKTI, a campus Asian-Pacific-American women's support group. SHAKTI 
representatives rejected the label of "special interest group," demonstrating that the sexual 
violence problem concerned women across all races. Umbreen Qadeer, a SHAKTI speaker 
and junior in LAS, said she felt compelled to present the views of women of color at the rally. 
"The sexual violence movement doesn't always address multicultural issues," Qadeer 
said. "A lot of times women of color don't come up because the issue tends to prioritize 
gender over race, but [gender and race] can't be separated for women of color." 

April's event showed a lot of progress for the anti-sexual assault cause after 18 
years of celebrating Take Back the Night. "The rally did accomplish something: the 
empowering feeling of walking down streets past fraternities and the bars on Daniel 
Street with a large group of women," Qadeer said. 

Encouragingly enough, the activism against sexual violence drew increasing numbers 
of male as well as female proponents. Two of the rally speakers were men, one from Men 
Against Sexual Violence and the other from Residential Life involved with sexual assault 
workshops. "They came forward and said they wanted to be a part of this diverse group 
that would represent not a narrow but broad focus," Morey said. 

Men also took part during the event by manning groups stationed at various 
points along the march to show support for the women and children. Some provided 
refreshments for the marchers at the end site. "The number of men involved is 
growing. It's a trend that's really exciting and uplifting," Morey said. 

Another positive sign for the anti-sexual assault faction was the decrease in friction 
roused by the march. In the past, people in organized groups would verbally harass and 
throw tilings at the participants. Although some individuals did cause trouble this year, 
Morey said Take Back the Night activities still ran much more peacefully and smoother. 
"There was no hostility towards the march. I really felt that was wonderful," Morey said. 





Student Life 





Women from various backgrounds 
came together to support one 
another for the TakeBack theNight 
events. Speakers during the night 
included sexual assault survivors 
and individuals from Panhellenic 
Committees, Rape Crisis Services 
and SHAKTI. 

Members of Men Against Sexual 
Violence came out to show their 
support for sexual assault 
awareness. Although the men were 
not allowed to march, they offered 
their support with encouraging 
cheers and by providing 
refreshments for the women. 



A Save 
the Night 
supporter 
draws a 
message 
on a 

poster in 
order to 
rally for 
sexual assualt aware- 
ness. On April 29, 
1994, members of the 
campus and commu- 
nity came together to 
march around campus 
to make students 
aware of the preva- 
lence of sexual 
assualt. 




Story by 
Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 

Layout by 
Mary Tagler 




Take Back the Night 73 




Children 

from 

Bottonfield 

School 

listen to 

— Veronica Alvarez 

the tour leader at 
Crystal Lake Park. 
The education com- 
mittee of SECS takes 
children from the 
community out in the 
field to become more 
acquainted with the 
environment. 



Story by 
Kristina Castillo 

Layout by 
Suk Ju Yun 



Lara Campbell, School Tour Leader 
of Crystal Lake Park, teaches five- 
year-oldDereck Gladney, a student 
from Bottonfield School, the 
difference betiveen various types 
of tree seeds. Aside from teaching 
children about the environment, 
one of the greatest accomp- 
lishments of SECS is their recycling 
program. 

Seven-year-old Alex Acheson, a 
student from Bottonfield School, 
looks through a magnifying glass 
during a nature walk at Crystal 
Lake Park. Children from the 
community are able to participate 
in the environmental programs 
directed by SECS. 




Student Life 





%\rn9 



the \y 



World Awarono(,<; 



MA 



-Veronica Alvarez 





Amnesty International and Students for Environmental Concerns (SECS) were 
two of many groups at U of I that did their part in helping the world be a nicer place. 
Members of both understood that in order to make a difference in the world, even in 
Champaign and Urbana, people need to do things themselves and get involved. 

"Amnesty International was not a political organization or a religious 
organization, which was sometimes the misconception," stated Tom Gillespie, junior 
in LAS, and co-coordinator for the group. The philosophy was simple. "We were 
simply a group of people who believed in rights for all genders, of any skin color 
under the sun, any nationality, any sexual orientation, any religious belief, and be 
able to follow any political rights group that does not infringe on these rights of other 
human beings," Gillespie said. The work of the group included the promotion of 
education and awareness on campus and in the community through letter writing. 
"It's important to have ties in the community because students are only in college for 
four years," Gillespie said. 

"We worked to enable all humans to have freedom from persecution. Basically 
we went through letter writing to specific government officials involved in human 
rights abuses. We wanted world awareness," Gillespie stated. Amnesty International 
is the largest human rights organization in the world, having over one million members 
and a home office based in London. During the past semesters, Amnesty had forty-five 
active student members with a mailing list of over one hundred community people. 

SECS focused on the environment, as its name suggests. "Essentially we 
worked on what issues went on around campus, and what people were interested in. 
In the beginning of the year, the main focus was on the prairie work," said Steve 
Frankel, fourth year graduate student in LAS, and chairperson for the group's 
political action committee. 

"SECS took action against prairie restoration in order to leave remnants of what 
was originally here for future generations," said Melinda Watts-Ellis, senior in FAA. 
Frankel added, "One of our greatest accomplishments of the past is the recycling program. 
We started it all over campus, and we got the university to adopt the program." 

A great deal of tiresome work finally seemed to make a difference. "After years 
of being in charge of recycling phone books we were able to get the whole campus 
more involved," said Greta Guzman, senior in Agriculture. 

"I became involved in SECS because I had Environmental interest, and I found 
this was one of the most active clubs on campus for that purpose," Watts-Ellis said. 
"The education committee had begun to fizzle out when I joined, and I felt it was 
important to get it going strong again. It's important to start young and teach children 
what consequences their actions have so they can learn to live more responsibly." 

The education committee of SECS actually got out "in the field" and took 
children from the community on hikes and the like. "I joined because I've always 
cared about the environment, and after becoming more aware of what is happening 
to our environment I decided I wanted to make a difference. I felt this group pointed 
me in the right direction," said Dawn Verest, sophomore in ALS. "I also became 
involved in the education committee because I felt that it was where change must 
begin. The committee enabled me to be involved with the Urbana Park District's 
Nature Center. We got to lead young school-age children on hikes through the woods 
where they became aquainted with different aspects of the environment like trees 
and insects. More importantly, they were able to see how the environment relates to 
them while still having fun." 



Save the World Clubs 75 




Perfi 



U of I Umd<; 
ftix Name- 5aKid£ 



o^ erg 



The U of I, in addition to supporting local talent, welcomed several 
professional musicians to its Assembly Hall and Foellinger Auditorium. 
This year the exciting performance list included Toad the Wet Sprocket, 
Live, Nine Inch Nails and Billy Joel. 

Toad the Wet Sprocket, an alternative music band of four male members 
headed by lead singer Glen Phillips, gave a concert at Foellinger Auditorium 
on Nov. 5, 1994. Among other favorites, they played "All I Want" from 
their last album, which brought them national acclamation. "They're not 
hard-core - they're pretty easygoing," Sean Rice, freshman in LAS, said 
about the band. "Their music isn't really dance-oriented, but there were 
people who danced anyway." 

Due to its less flashy performing style, this show attracted mostly Toad the 
Wet Sprocket's devoted fans. "The show wasn't really astounding unless you 
were familiar with the music," Rice said. "I had a friend who was sleeping, but 
I know their album well so I really enjoyed it." The performance was opened 
by the Wild Colonials, who "were surprisingly good," Rice said. 

Nine Inch Nails (NIN), played its industrial music on Wednesday, Nov. 
9, 1994, at Assembly Hall, to its usual receptive audience. "I thought NIN 
played very powerfully and they played to the tempo set by the robust 
crowd," John Strougal, freshman in Engineering, said. 

Other students echoed this positive sentiment: "It was the best concert 
I've ever been to," Kathy Kottaras, freshman in LAS, said. 

The Jim Rose Circus added entertainment to the NIN concert. Their side 
show included a swallower of swords and razor blades and a man who 
swung cement blocks from his earrings, nose ring, tongue ring and nipple 
rings. Another member of the Circus demonstrated that he could wiggle 
his entire body through a tennis racket. As the night progressed, the 
excited crowd became so difficult to manage that the hired security 
eventually gave up trying to keep audience members off the main floor. 

On Thursday, Nov. 10, 1994, students paid $14.50 to see the band Live 
perform in the more intimate Foellinger Auditorium. On the stage was 
displayed a portrait of a friend of Live who had died of AIDS. The atmosphere 
was calm until the band began. Eventually, the Auditorium was teeming with 
people singing along and dancing near their seats. "The concert got 
progressively better as it went on," Laura Glaser, freshman in LAS, said. "I do 
wish they had played more of their old stuff though." 

Billy Joel made his second appearance at the U of I on Oct. 28, 1994, to 
a sold-out Assembly Hall. Those who attended were among Joel's fans 
who had followed his music for close to two decades. "It was a great 
concert because he played his old songs as well as new songs from [his 
latest album] 'River of Dreams,'" Jenny Houk, junior in LAS, said. "The 
best part of the concert was the encore, 'Piano Man.' The audience really 
got into it and that made it exciting." 



Billy Joel sings "Pressure" during 
his River of Dreams Tour that 
stopped in Champaign on October 
29, 1994. Joel made his second 
appearance at the U of I to a sold- 
out Assembly Hall. 

Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails 
yells out a song during their 
concert on November 9, 1994. The 
side show at the concert included a 
swallower of swords and razor 
blades and a man who swung 
cement blocks from his earrings, 
nose ring, tongue ring and nipple 
rings. 




76 Student Life 




The lead 
singer of 
Toad the 
Wet 

Sprocket, 
Glen 
Phillips, 
performs 
at 

Foellinger Audito- 
rium November 5, 
1994. Toad the Wet 
Sprocket was just 
one of many big 
bands that Foellinger 
hosted last fall. 




-Ryan Donovan 



Story by 
Vida Riskus 



m 



Layout by 
Peggy Christensen 



Famous Performers 77 




JVlany 

Tho'ir Special Pan 

Since we were little, birthdays have been a time of celebration. For some, 
a birthday meant a cake and candles plus a party in your honor. The 
tradition continued as college students all over gathered to celebrate the 
birth of a fellow classmate. How did the average student celebrate? 

For Karen Corrigan, sophomore in Agriculture, it was a weekend to (try 
to) remember. "We started Friday at 2:30 p.m. at Nabor house, Saturday 
was Alpha Gamma Sigma and Sunday it was R&R's Sports Grill," Corrigan 
stated. "I was still drunk Monday morning when I went to class," Corrigan 
added. 

Corrigan's boyfriend celebrated his day of birth the beginning of the Fall 
of 1994. "We got him drunk at his fraternity house then sang songs to him 
while he puked in the bathroom," Corrigan said. 

Alcohol seemed to be an important element in many birthday celebrations. 
In campustown, often the sound of students congratulating a friend on the 
addition of another year of life wafted onto Green Street. A look inside 
showed them encouraging that friend to just have one more shot before the 
night was over. 

Jamie Carr, sophomore in Engineering, celebrated his birthday in a more 
laid back manner. "Saturday, my parents and grandparents on my mom's 
side, came down and took me out shopping for nice clothes to wear," Carr 
stated. "For dinner, we went to Silver Creek, which was very nice," he 
added. Carr did mention that on Sunday, his actual birthday, he attacked 
his homework. 

So Young Yang, junior in LAS, remembered her birthday from freshman 
year. She was using the Internet to meet people. "I made friends with a lot 
of different guys from all over the world," Yang said. "When my birthday 
came, I received presents from a lot of these guys that I had befriended. 
Some of the places I received gifts from were Korea, Australia and Texas," 
Yang added. 

Creative birthday announcements could be found all around the campus. 
Signs could often be found proclaiming the birthday of some (un)f ortunate 
person. Often signs showed the happy birthday victim's most embarrassing 
photograph. Accompanying words, composed by only the truest of friends, 
added to the general hilarity. Incriminating chalk messages could be found 
on the sidewalks all about the Quad. 

Birthday celebrations were as diverse as the people who celebrated 
them. From shopping to drinking, birthdays were a way for people to get 
together, relax and just have a good time. As a last resort, they were another 
day to get some homework done. 




78 Student Life 



Carol Weber orders a 
drink at the bar of CO. 
Daniel's to celebrate her 
birthday. Although 
alcohol plays a part in 
many a birthday, some 
students do celebrate 
their special day with 
their friends and family 
with a traditional cake 
filled with candles. 











Mike Macellaio, 
senior in LAS, 
pours three shots 
into the mouth of 
birthday girl 
Carol Weber, 
senior in CBA. 
Weber cel-ebrated 
her 21st birthday 
on Sept. 13, 1994. 



— Peggy Christensen 




Many 
students 
do not 
have the opportu- 
nity to bake a birth 
day cake — instead, 
they go to their 
nearest baker and 
buy one. Students 
celebrate their 
birthdays in many 
ways - some with 
alcohol, some with 
cake and even some 
with homework?!? 




Story by 

Jennifer Arendarczyk 

Layout by 
SukJuYun 



Birthdays 79 




Students 
partici- 
pate in a 
step 
aerobics 
program 

— Jq{in Hanson 

on one of the bas- 
ketball courts at 
IMPE. A variety of 
different activities 
are available at 
IMPE to help stu- 
dents keep in shape. 



Story by 
Emma Brennan 

Layout by 
Colleen Murray 




Wade Midler, junior in Engineering, works on 
his hip strength on the Hip Abduction machine 
in the weight room at IMPE. Exercisers who 
tire from the monotony of these activities have the 
option of attending one of the many aerobics 
sessions offered at IMPE. 

Daniella Alagna, freshman in CBA, works 
out on a stationary bike at IMPE. Another 
feature offered at IMPE that most students 
overlook is the Sportivell Center, which strives to 
teach U of I students proper nutrition and exercise 
techniques. 





Student Life 





im 





for Ev 

Tho Wide 
World of Sporfc 



e ^one 



The Intramural Physical Education Building (IMPE) has a lot more to offer U of I 
students than most people realize. Although the weight room and the basketball courts 
are the most popular attractions, many other facilities and programs are available for 
students, including some features that are not even sports-related. 

When temperatures in Champaign-Urbana reach into the nineties, students greatly 
appreciate the outdoor pool and tennis courts at IMPE. However, IMPE also has many 
indoor facilities because the weather at U of I is not always pleasant. Throughout the 
year, courts are available for many activities, including basketball, volleyball and 
walleyball. There is also an archery room and an area for fencing in the combat room 
for those people with a more adventurous side. 

For students attempting to reverse the effects of partying and late-night pizza binges, 
a variety of aerobic machines are available at IMPE, such as Stairmaster, E)ynocycle and 
Crossaerobics. Exercisers who tire from the monotony of these activities have the option 
of attending one of the many aerobics sessions offered at IMPE, with classes ranging from 
Automatic Jam, where students learn funk moves, to Aqua Step, where students can do 
step aerobics with the added resistance of water. "I prefer to do aerobics at IMPE because 
there aren't so many sweaty, horny guys standing around and watching us do aerobics, 
like there are at Wimpy [Campus Recreation Center-East]," said Tara Blinn, junior in CB A. 

Various intramural and club sports are also offered through the Division of Campus 
Recreation (DCR) at IMPE. Students have a wide variety of team sports to play and 
activities to get involved in, with choices ranging from The Weightlifting Ulini to Tae Kwon 
Do. The "Need a Match Board" is available to help students locate others who are looking 
for a partner for a particular sport. "Through IMPE, I was able to get a soccer team together 
with the girls on my floor. I think this is a great opportunity because I played sports in high 
school, and this way I can continue to have fun playing the sports I like, but I don't have 
to worry about a time commitment," said Keila Lopez, sophomore in LAS. 

Another feature offered at IMPE that most students overlook is the Sportwell Center. 
This program, the result of a cooperative effort between the DCR and McKinley Health 
Center, strives to teach U of I students proper nutrition and exercise techniques. Offerings 
at the Sportwell Center include a sports injury prevention program, fitness and nutrition 
consultation and an eating disorder support group. Sportwell also contains the Body Shop, 
where students can make appointments to have their fitness assessed and their body 
composition tested. "When I visited Sportwell, a nutritionist helped me design a workout 
program that was suited to my needs. My experience there was very informative because 
I was able to find out about my strength, flexibility and endurance," said Joannie Wei, 
sophomore in Education. 

The DCR also offers students opportunities to experience the great outdoors. A 
variety of trips are planned each year, allowing U of I students to travel the United States. 
In 1994, trips were planned for a bicycle excursion through Wisconsin, a backpack trip in 
the Smoky Mountains and a canoe trip to Upper Michigan. For those who prefer to plan 
their own trips, IMPE also features the Camping Room where students can rent tents, 
sleeping bags and rain tarps. 

Students go to IMPE for a variety of reasons, and with all the opportunities that are 
available to them, most are able to fulfill their purpose. "My friends and I like to go to IMPE 
because we can watch the boys play basketball as we walk around the track," said Rae 
Subbiah, freshman in LAS. 



IMPE 81 




— Matt Grotto 



All three floors 

combined occupy 

31,584 square feet. 



Story by 
Laura Amrein 



Layout by 
Suk Ju Yun 



Tlie main entrance to the Illini 
Unioti Bookstore faces Wright 
andDaniel Streets. Tliebookstore 
opened in August, Justin time for 
the fall book rush. 

The entrance to TIS, TOO faces 
Sixth Street in Champaign. TIS, 
TOO offers students a place to 
study while drinking coffee. 




82 Student Life 





Ss^SPPIPIi^Ssi^ 





^11*1 




nre Shelf s 

Ovov\ for ftvQnoc.c, 



p^ce 



The 1994 Fall book rush was a little different than it had been in past 
years. Two of the book stores on campus underwent major changes during 
the Summer of 1994. TIS added TIS, TOO which was a general bookstore 
and a coffee shop. The Illini Union Bookstore (IUB) moved into a new 
building on the corner of Wright and Daniel Streets. 

The larger IUB encouraged many students to buy their first semester 
books there. "I had never bought my books at IUB before this fall because 
the old store was too small," Jennifer West, sophomore in LAS, said. "I 
didn't want to hassle with buying my books from a crowded store. I 
decided to go to IUB this year since a lot of my friends were talking about 
it. It was nice because I only had to make one trip. They had all my books 
in stock. I also could charge it on my ID," West added. 

Although it devoted a whole floor to them, the three-story IUB did not 
just offer textbooks. The ground floor offered general reading books along 
with extras such as office supplies, calendars and stationery. A large 
selection of school supplies along with U of I gifts were located on the top 
floor. 

Not everyone was excited about the larger store. To some students, the 
expansion was a bit confusing. "The new Illini Union Bookstore is really 
big," said Vincent Formanek, sophomore in CBA. "I don't have a clue 
where anything is. I felt like a freshman all over again." 

IUB was not the only campus bookstore that made dramatic changes 
over the summer in preparation for the Fall of 1994. TIS added TIS, TOO, 
located right across from the main bookstore on Sixth Street. TIS, TOO 
specialized in general reading books. Work on the new bookstore started 
the Spring of 1 994 and finished right before school started for the 1 994-1 995 
school year. The management decided to build an entirely independent 
store because the old location was not large enough for all of their 
merchandise. The staff for TIS, TOO was separate from that of TIS, although 
when the cafe opened in late Fall of 1994, some employees moved across the 
street. 

The Bookplate Cafe, a new espresso and coffee shop, was located inside 
TIS, TOO. It provided students with a place to read or study in a relaxed 
atmosphere. 

The staff at TIS was very excited about the expansion of the bookstore. 
The Bookplate Cafe is just one of many new things at TIS this year. The 
bookstore's layout was completely changed to accommodate the TIS copy 
shop which was built next door to the main bookstore. "The staff at TIS was 
looking forward to coming back to work in the enlarged bookstore." said 
Kate Hudson, sophomore in ALS and TIS employee. 

The changes that were made to the bookstores made shopping for 
textbooks and other necessities easier and more enjoyable. The larger IUB 
and TIS proved that bigger is often times better. 



New Bookstores 83 






bal 



Te-Ki ftbvrc, of 
and &Y&csY v fo'\Y\mc'Y& 



^a 



Spring 1994's Bandjam played to the theme of "Band Jambalaya: Hotter Than 
Mama Makes It." Mama's Secret Recipe called for ingredients like four pinches of 
Mother and 1/3 pound of Dick Justice. Liberal amounts of Milo, Thirdstone, 
SteakDaddy Six, Los Crudos, Jumpknuckle, Soulstice, Moon Seven Times and 
Suede Chain rounded out the mixed stew of local talent at the annual campus 
event. 

Bandjam showcased local bands for U of I students to enjoy during the day at 
no cost. "If s just a great chance to get out and see all the local bands," said Ryan 
Aubin, StarCourse member and a sophomore in Engineering. 

StarCourse, a university club which drew name-brand musical attractions to 
campus, organized Bandjam. "If s our way to keep a good relationship with the 
local bands and to do something for them," said Emily Olsen, Bandjam co- 
coordinator and senior in Agriculture. 

Record Service, SORF, the Daily fJlini, A.J. Wingers, Le Shoppe, Spirit Screen 
Printing, WPGU-the Planet 107.1 and Assembly Hall all chipped in to maintain the 
free admission of '94's version. 

The participating bands garnered free publicity and the privilege of earning a 
place in the musical lineup. Students had voted for them at the fllini Union 
StarCourse polling booth during April, 1994, as their eight favorite local bands. 
During the event, the bands sold a variety of paraphernalia, like t-shirts, CDs and 
singles. 

Bandjam '94 landed on May 1. This year's event attracted about 2,500 music- 
lovers, despite the chilly weather. Other standout incidents of Bandjam '94 
involved active band interaction with the audience. The drummer from Dick 
Justice leaped off the stage during the band's stint, got on a bike and threw out 
dandelions and Dick Justice stickers from a basket to the audience. "I thought that 
was pretty exciting," Aubin said. 

In general, band members were fairly interactive with the students. For 
example, heavy metal group, Los Crudos, often was politically outspoken when 
introducing their songs. "The bands were really nice. You could talk to them," Tim 
Dellinger, junior in Engineering, said. 

It was the ninth year running, and perhaps some Bandjam standards transcend 
time. Bandjam was traditionally held on the first Sunday of every May. The spring 
date always fell before the head strain of year-end final exams. Thus, Bandjam 
served as a "welcome summertime or last big bash" for students, Dellinger said. 

"You see people you haven't seen all semester, and you bitch about exams," 
Dellinger added. 

Bandjaml 994 lasted nearly half a day - from noon until 1 p.m. at the south end 
of the Quad. "A nice long 10 hours of music and entertainment," said Paul Fuller, 
a StarCourse member and sophomore in LAS. 



Members of The Screams per- 
form during Bandjam. The 
event, which has been held for the 
past nine years, is traditionally 
held at the beginning of May. 



Jump Knuckle's guitarist jams 
with his band. Bands that 
participated were chosen by a 
student vote which was held at 
the Union several weeks before 
the event. 



' 



84 Student Life 






featured nearly half a 
day's worth of music 
by local bands. The 
event is organized 
annually in an effort 
to expose U of I stu- 
dents to local talent. 



Story by 
Chaun-Lin Alice Tsai 

r Layout by 
Monica Soltesz 



Claudcttc Roulo 



Band Jam 85 




"There 

are so 

many 

little 

things 

that add 

up when 



—Rick Widmer 



you're at school. It 

seems like you never 

have any money even 

when you try to be 

careful with it. I felt 

guilty asking my 

parents to help me out 

all the time and I 

knew they were 

getting mad." 

— Dan Gerbasi 




Story by 
Sonali Das 



33> 

Layout by 
Rob Young 



86 Student Life 







Now 

It is a never-ending struggle. On any given day, one can hear the 
common cries of a college student complaining, "I have no money!" Just 
casually bringing up the subject in conversation often leads to sighs and 
looks of despair. Money is the enemy and common nuisance for students 
at any campus in the country. Where it goes, how to manage it and, most 
importantly, how to get it, all become life-threatening questions. 

Setting up a budget is often a source of more frustration than benefit. 
Junior in CBA, Dan Gerbasi said, "There are so many little things that add 
up when you're at school. It seems like you never have any money even 
when you try to be careful with it." 

These "personal expenses," as they are often dubbed, are the major 
problem for students. Late night pizza, beer and CDs all add up leaving 
students bewildered as they try to understand what happened to the cash. 
"You don't think about all those added expenses," sophomore in LAS, 
Courtney Welsh said. "When you're at home Mom and Dad pay." 

Extra costs like these are the main motivation for students to look for 
financial help from a job. "I felt guilty asking my parents to help me out all 
the time and I knew they were getting mad," Gerbasi said. "I wanted 
something of my own so that I wouldn't have to feel guilty." With the 
added costs of being in a fraternity, Gerbasi found that his job of working 
about 1 hours a week gave him just enough spending money for the week, 
and it also allowed him to help share the costs with his parents. 

In a similar situation, Welsh worked throughout the summer and winter 
vacation holidays to help ease the financial strain during the year. Although 
she found it difficult to work during the school year with her busy 
schedule, by working a lot of hours over the holidays, she could "see right 
from the beginning what my limits were and can plan accordingly for the 
rest of the year." 

According to University advisors, setting up guidelines for spending 
was the first step in the money management process. By roughly estimating 
costs for the year and the areas that require priority, one could set up a 
realistic approach to spending money wisely. 

Being realistic in spending was the key financial axiom for freshman in 
Education, Ann Mielowitz. "If you know you are easily tempted, you 
shouldn't think that all of a sudden you will make this big change," she 
said. For Mielowitz, the easiest way to set up a budget was to cut out treats 
such as eating out. "I figured since I already paid for my meals in the dorm, 
there was no point in wasting that," Mielowitz said. "Once in a while, I will 
splurge, but I try to keep it down to a minimum." 

Welsh agreed. "If you can cut out those things that are wasteful and keep 
spending down, you can make it on a reasonable budget," Welsh said. 
"Most of the time too, there's always Mom and Dad." 



Zorie Leon, senior in ALS, helps 
TIS customer, Amy E. Wysocki. 
leon earns some extra money at 
VIS as a cashier. 



Money 87 



%€ 



tfal 



ICi<^c£ And Ohara 



dcA~or V 



Kung Fu of Illinois, Goshin Jitsu and Tae Kwon Do - which includes two brands: 
Sung Lee and DJini branches - are just a smattering of the myriad of martial arts 
classes offered at U of I. Each class is not just a slight variation on the theme of 
'1dckingandpuncliing''apotentialattacker-eachonereallyis different. Depending 
on how "deep" a mental and physical training desired, you can pick and choose 
amongst the types of classes. 

At Kung Fu of Illinois, instructors focus primarily on the mental discipline and 
character development that accompanies the physical aspect of the class. "It 
humbles you to learn something not taught to everybody. This can be dangerous 
so you have to use it properly," said Valton Henderson, an instructor of Kung Fu 
of Dlinois. 

Students also acquire the character traits of fairness, honesty and trust, along 
with humility. These characteristics reinforce an inner strength that often is more 
valued than the muscular strength which develops. When people do not see a 
display of flashy moves and showy strikes, that is when a true student of Kung Fu 
can be seen. "You can tell by their demeanor someone who's been studying for a 
long time - unassuming, quiet. It takes a great deal of inner strength and inner 
peace," Henderson said. 

fllini Tae Kwon Do also devotes much of its lessons to philosophical and cultural 
awareness. Founded in the late 1960s, it is not only the oldest of the martial arts 
introduced on campus, but also very traditional in its style of mental training. 'Tllini 
Tae Kwon Do focuses a lot on the traditions straight out of Korea. We don't focus 
a lot on sparring or contact, but on the philosophy and art, instead of fighting," said 
Tim VanMaren, club vice-president and a sophomore in Aviation. 

On the other hand, Goshin Jitsu teaches mainly the physical preparation for fight 
or flight. The mental training is less a regimented part of the lessons than an implied 
instruction. "Our martial art is founded on the principle that people should be able 
to defend themselves and be prepared to handle situations," said Eric Olson, an 
instructor of Goshin Jitsu. The mental framing of Goshin Jitsu boils down to the 
ability of the student "not to panic in self-defense situations, self-confidence and the 
visualization of being attacked to prepare [oneself] mentally," Olson added. 

Goshin Jitsu is truly a one-of-a-kind martial arts style formed only at the U of I. 
Unlike many of the better known styles, such as tae kwon do or judo, the Tiigher 
purpose' is not to train its students for a competitive sport. It developed and exists 
out of a need for people to be able to protect themselves. 

Sung Lee Tae Kwon Do also concentrates more on the movements than the brain 
activities behind them. "We don't get too much into the philosophical aspect," said 
Fred Huang, an instructor of Sung Lee. 

Huang said, though, that some mental benefits could be derived from the 
physical training: self-growth, self-discipline, stress-relief and an inclination toward 
hard work. 

Martial arts at U of I ran the gamut from no-brainers to deeply cerebral 
experiences. Whatever martial arts class is chosen, keep the following words of 
advice in mind. "The best martial art is how to avoid a fight as opposed to learning 
how to seek one." 




Shizu Valton Henderson gives 
guidance to Ruth Altman, 
graduate student in FAA, and 
Michelle Johnson, graduate 
student in LAS, during a Kung 
Fu of Illinois class at IMPE. 
Some of the benefits of martial 
arts training include self- 
growth and self-discipline. 



Shizu Valton Henderson readies 
a kicking pad for Kung Fu student 
Michelle fohnson during a class 
in IMPE. Mental discipline and 
character accompany the obvious 
physical benefits of this class. 



88 Student Life 




Michelle 
Johnson 
practices 
a move 
during her 
Kung Fu 
class at IMPE. The 
best martial art is 
how to avoid a fight 
as opposed to learn- 
ing how to seek one. 




-Tim Hutchinson 



Story by 
Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 

Layout by 
Erin Evans 



Martial Arts 89 



ftv 





rije You* 

1 1 ▼ Oampvc, ParfciKi, 

What is the easiest way for the U of I to make a buck? Parking meters! At least 
that is what everyone thinks. Even if you flood the meter with your last quarters, 
you can still get a ticket. Why is it that everyone except the people who pay to go 
here have assigned parking places in areas where it does not take a year to get 
where you have to go? 

Not only do students pay thousands of dollars a semester in tuition, room and 
board, but we plunk away hundreds of dollars in quarters on these meters. "I think 
the university is being really greedy. Maybe if they could come up with a better 
system for the parking, I'd be a little more understanding. I feel like I'm being 
robbed! Plus, there isn't ever enough time on those meters!" said Ayanna Garret, 
senior in Communications. Contrary to popular excuse, many students opt for the 
ticket. It is only three dollars if you pay it within three days. So the university 
makes a pretty hefty profit off people who either do not feed the meters or ignore 
them. "There's just nowhere to park! Why do they make it so hard for people to 
park?" said LaTacia Morgan, graduate student in Education. 

According to the Campus Division of Parking and Transportation, there are a 
number of things students can do to avoid getting tickets. They stress that the 
parking meter people do not gleefully go around town writing tickets. In fact, they 
have tried a few different strategies to educate students on the parking system 
here. They were present at on-campus registration in the Armory, and they have 
visited the College of Law to reach students there. For a few months in the 
beginning of the year, they put fliers on cars which were not registered instead of 
ticketing them. 

Rod Weis, Director of the Campus Division of Parking and Transportation gave 
some suggestions on how students can avoid getting tickets. Weis said that the 
number one ticket they write is for unregistered vehicles. That is a $15 violation, 
and it goes up to $20 if you do not pay it within 72 hours. Students can also buy 
passes for the storage lots on campus. A storage lot means that you can park there 
24 hours a day, whereas most parking lots and streets on campus have parking 
restrictions from 2-6 a.m. 

For those students who simply have to have the luxury of their car waiting for 
them right outside their classroom door, always carry at least $4 in quarters with 
you at all times. That way you will always be prepared for those meters that accept 
only quarters. "I don't object to the meters. My problem is with the tickets! [The 
meters] should have more than a half hour per quarter. They make so much money 
from tickets, they can afford to make all meters on campus an hour per quarter," 
said Paul Hutchinson, senior in Engineering. 

The more economical students who simply do not want the extra hassle take the 
bus. The U of I has one of the finest bus systems in the country, and it only costs 
a flash of your beautiful ID picture. If you just cannot contain your feelings about 
the parking problems, write letters to the Campus Division of Parking and 
Transportation with some suggestions about how parking should be run. Rod 
Weis at Campus parking, welcomes any suggestions. Phone calls are harder to 
take because there are only so many hours in the day, but letters are always great. 
Just be nice. 



Sandra Martin writes a parking ticket on 
behalf of the City of Champaign for a car 
parked next to a time-expired meter. 
University students can take the MTD bus to 
avoid the hassle of parking on campus. 




90 Student Life 




Parking 
seems to 
be a 

problem 
for stu- 
dents, especially since 
a few tickets can add 
up to a large fine. 
Campus parking 
publishes a pamphlet 
for students that 
outlines their rules so 
students can avoid 
receiving tickets. 




— Lee Anne Paulauski 



Story by 

Toi Michelle Walker 

Layout by 
Peggy Christensen 



Campus Parking 91 





Mike 




Necker- 


Wm 


mann, 




sopho- 




more in 




LAS, 




loads 


—Rick Widme 




equipn 


nent onto a 



moving truck after a 
Starcourse Produc- 
tion. Foellinger 
Auditorium opened 
on Novermber 4, 
1904, with two days 
of concerts. 




June Day on, sophomore in FAA, and Joaquin 
McCoy, junior in LAS, lower a speaker to the 
ground after a concert at Foellinger 
Auditorium. Over 150 events are held annually 
at Foellinger. 

Steve Bauer, junior in Agriculture, and Steve 
Schaeffer, junior in FAA, lower a boom from 
the scoff o Iding after the Toad the Wet Sprocket 
concert. Many fatuous performers have 
entertained at Foellinger such as Duke 
Ellington and John Philip Souza. 



Story by 

Cornelio Casaclang 

Layout by 
Colleen Christensen 



92 Scudem Life 





-Rick Widmer 




of the 




Harvard?! This was the common reaction of many a proud Illini to the May 1993 
film "With Honors" being set on the U of I Quad. The director's crew spent the day 
transforming the face and forecourt of Foellinger Auditorium into a Harvard 
graduation ceremony. The Harvard graduate director felt the Auditorium resembled 
Harvard well enough for a movie without demanding an ivy-league honorarium. 
Add a few Crimson Tide banners and some foliage to the trees, and hey, it's 
distinctively "Harvard." 

Nothing could be more wrong. 

If there is something unique about U of I, it is the Quad. And nothing epitomizes 
the Quad more than the Foellinger Auditorium. She is the Queen on her throne, her 
court the bowing buildings surrounding her. Her crown, the dome, rising high above 
the sun-bathers, the frisbee players and the students. 

Clarence Howard Blackall, Class of 1887, the architect of the Quad building, 
believed the Auditorium could potentially be the focus of the entire University. The 
building was placed on the southern boundary of the Quad as the "axis of University 
growth." In fact, Blackall went so far as to center the Auditorium dome with Nevada 
Street, so that her dome could be seen all along Nevada. However, the state legislature 
only allocated half of the $200,000 the U of I requested to build the Auditorium. With 
less money in hand, Blackall had to modify his design. The proposed backstage area 
and a south wing to house the School of Music were shelved. Construction took 
two years and the Auditorium opened officially on November 4, 1907, with two 
days of concerts. 

It was then that the famous acoustical problem of the Auditorium was discovered 
it had a powerful echo. Despite this, the Auditorium housed famous performers like 
John Philip Souza (1909), Sergei Rachmaninoff (1924) and Duke Ellington (1948). 
Also, there are regular performances by Illini Union Board (IUB), professional acting 
troupes and musical performers. This year's IUB Fall Musical was "Pippin." Amy 
Abler, senior in FAA, who provided the piano accompaniment for the show, said, 
"The show was really done well. I thought it was great, and I'm not just saying that 
because I was in it." 

Soon, age brought the Auditorium into a state of decay. With the later campus 
additions of Smith Memorial Hall, the Krannert Center and Assembly Hall, the 
Auditorium was often ignored and fell further into decay. Then in 1982, Helene 
Foellinger, Class of 1932, donated $3 million toward the renovation of the building 
which added seating with pull-up desks, created the backstage area and forecourt 
and upgraded the sound and lighting systems. 

Since it reopened on April 26, 1 985, the renamed Foellinger Auditorium held about 
150 events annually. Most freshmen found themselves in Foellinger for at least one 
100-level lecture. "I know someone who, one semester, took all of his 18 hours in 
Foellinger," Austin Victor, junior in LAS, said. 

The renovations made a number of practical changes. They may not have 
corrected the echo, but like the crack in the Liberty Bell, it's what makes Foellinger 
Auditorium just a little different. 

And that's gotta count for something nowadays. 



Foellinger Auditorium 93 




An elec- 
tion 
judge 
places a 
student's 
ballot in 
the 
ballot 
box 

—Ed Finke 

during the 1994 guber- 
natorial elections. 
Many students who 
had just turned eigh- 
teen took advantage 
of their newly ac- 
quired right to be 
voting citizens. 



Story by 

Peggy Christensen 

Layout by 
Monica Soltesz 



" J 4 Student Life 




Angela English, senior in FAA, 
picks up her ballot from an 
election judge in order to place 
her vote at Lincoln Avenue 
Residence Hall on Tuesday, 
Nov. 8, 1994. Approximately 
1,902 students voted in the 
gubernatorial election. 

A student exits a voting booth 
after casting her vote at Lincoln 
Avenue Residence Hall on 
Election Day. Students liked the 
fact that different polling places 
were setup at many of the campus 
Residence Halls. 










•rrfe 

C-di<A Thc-'w Vote- 



M 



November 8, 1 994, was a big day for the people of the United States. The race for 
governor had been taking up the majority of television commercial time and 
billboard space for weeks, and it would finally come to a screeching halt with the 
decision made by the voting public. Concerning the race for governor between 
Dawn Clark Netsch and Jim Edgar, Brenna Butler, sophomore in LAS, said, 'The 
only way I know their platforms is from commercials." 

Here in Champaign-Urbana, many students chose to take part in voting for the 
leaders of the state of niinois. To make tilings easy, polling places were set up all over 
campus to motivate more students to cast their votes. Registration booths were set 
up on the Quad as well as in many residence hall lobbies. Other students had to go 
to local village halls or community centers. "I don't mind," said Todd McDonald, 
senior in LAS. "I think that for a process that important, it's fairly minimal what you 
have to do." 

In addition, many students who had just turned 18 decided to use their newly 
acquired rights in the polling booths by casting an informed vote. "Now that I am 
of age to vote, people take my opinions more seriously and I pay attention to politics 
more," said Katie Stembridge, freshman in LAS. 

On the other hand, some students were not as interested in voting and politics 
as others despite the easy access to voter registration. "I do listen to what candidates 
have to offer, but I'm in school and too busy to get into politics right now," said 
David Cruz, sophomore in LAS. 

For some students who came out on the rainy Tuesday to vote, the voting 
process was not so easy. Many had their voter eligibility challenged, and they were 
not allowed to vote in the election unless they showed two pieces of identification 
to prove that they were registered to vote. For many, this was extremely aggravating. 
'Tve been looking forward to voting this election. I've really kept up with 
everything. I think if these candidates want the student vote, they need to make it 
more clear what an already registered voter needs to do to remain a voter," said 
Kerri Lyon, senior in Communications. Lyons' voter eligibility was contested 
when she tried to cast her ballot at the Illinois Street Residence Hall. Because of this 
hassle, many people left the polling places without voting. 

Contrary to what many people thought, the number of student voters this year 
was very similar to the number of student voters in the past years. Approximately 
1,902 campus votes were recorded for this 1994 gubernatorial election. Although 
more people vote in the presidential races, this is a normal turnout of students for 
a legislative race. 

With the election day of 1 994 in the past, many students returned to their normal 
lives - watching television without being interrupted by the derogatory comments 
of the candidates concerning their opponents. Although some did not cash in on 
their right to vote, the students at the U of I are lucky to have the freedom to help 
make important decisions such as choosing our leaders. 



Voting on Campus 95 



El 



Europa 
House, 
located 
on a 
residen- 
tial, tree- 
lined 



Iim Hutcmn.s 



street in Urbana, is 

another alternative to 

residence halls and 

other certified housing 

on campus. Many of 

the residents of 

Europa House enjoy 

the peaceful, quiet 

environment that 

their home provides. 



Story by 
Urbano Chaidez 

Layout by 
Monica Soltesz 



Europa House residents have several living 
alternatives. They can choose from a studio 
apartment for two people or a two bedroom 
for four people, as well as choosingbetween 
cooking in their apartments or signing up 
for a meal plan at the University Residence 
Hall cafeterias. 




96 Student Life 




r* 



* 






';- 



I 



1 1 l J- \JnoNo Mmo^vhoro 



V\o^oc, Shdov&<> 



^tive 



The U of I offered a variety of places for new and returning students to live. 
One unique example of university certified housing was located on the 
corners of Oregon and Busey Streets in residential Urbana. 

Europa House was conveniently located near the Krannert Center for the 
Performing Arts, Oregon Computer Site, Campus Recreation Center-East (CRCE) 
and McKinley Health Center. The immediately surrounding area also provided 
the essentials: several fast food places, cafes and a small grocery store. 

Residents enjoyed living in some of the biggest apartments on campus. Europa 
offered a choice between two living arrangements: a two bedroom for four people 
and a studio for two. The apartments were fully furnished, each offering spacious 
closets, a kitchen, living room, private bathroom and a balcony or patio. 

What made Europa unique with respect to such private residence halls as 
Bromley and Illini Towers was the opportunity to cook in the apartments 
and /or get a flexible meal plan through the university. The residents lived in 
a secure apartment complex and had access to a lounge with a giant screen 
satellite TV and VCR, an outdoor pool with a sun deck and roofed parking. 

Europa was a quiet place for serious students. The comfortable house was 
set in a quiet neighborhood of oak and elm-lined brick streets. "It is really nice 
and quiet . . . there is no loud music," said Jose Antonio Lopez, sophomore in 
Engineering. The rooms were large enough so students were not too close to 
each other, securing that coveted personal space. 

"Not everyone is in at once . . . we can study in separate rooms," says Raed 
Elkhatib, freshman in LAS. Noise rules in Europa House, unlike those in many 
a University residence hall, were enforced. 

The expenses for Europa were not significantly higher compared to those for the 
dorms, Bromley or mini Towers. According to Julie Strode, the Director of Europa 
House, students paid $1300 per semester with utilities costing extra. The rent was 
usually paid in three installment including a deposit. The residents paid for 
electricity and gas together and were billed separately for the telephone. 

Bills did not rank among large problems in the lives of Europa House residents. 
Corifining the meal plan to eating in the apartments, on the other hand, did not 
satisfy everyone. U of I offered students the opportunity of a 20, 14 or seven meal 
plan to be used at any of the resident halls, the mini Union, the Orange, Beckman 
Cafeteria or the Law Cafeteria. The meal plans provided residents with a choice of 
cooking in their apartments and eating on campus between classes. 

Residents chose Europa House for its quiet environment and took advantage of 
the nearby facilities and shops. "It is nice and spacious . . . there is a friendly 
environment," Lopez said. "I will probably live here again next year." 



*HK-«f 



-Lee Anne Paulauski 



Europa House 97 



<5o 



Abortion rights 



fm 


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dfll sT 'I^^^W v 


l^^fe. ' 




1 li Ail^HbJH 


^^k .*fa 






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Local activists and politi- 
cians gathered at the Levis 
Faculty Center to commemo- 
rate the 22nd anniversity of 
the U.S. Supreme Court le- 
galization of abortion. 

Karen Cody Carlson, presi- 
dent of Planned Parenthood 
of East Central Illinois, said 
five people had been killed out- 
side abortion clinics including 
two receptionists at separate 
clinics in Brookline, Mass. 
Other acts of violence against 
clinics included invasion and 
death threats. 

Champaign Mayor Dannel 
McCollum read a mayoral proc- 
lamation that he and Urbana 
mayor Tod Satterthwaite had 



signed earlier in the day to stop 
abortion violence. 

"The cities of Champaign and 
Urbana are cities with zero tol- 
erance of anti-choice terrorism 
and violence," said McCollum, 
cpioting the proclamation. 

The proclamation also said 
the cities will "support and pro- 
tect women and health care pro- 
viders" and "call for citizens to 
stand together in opposition to 
the violent tactics of zealots and 
terrorists of all sorts." 

Former State Rep. Laurel 
Prussing told the 70 people 
gathered for the event that the 
Clinic Access bill would be re- 
introduced in the Illinois Gen- 
eral Assembly. 



-Daily Mini file photo 



New Chief 

The new Chief for the 
1994-95 school year was 
selected April 20. John 
Creech, sophomore in 
LAS, said he was not af- 
fected by people protest- 
ing against his new job. 
Creech said he saw the 
position as a great expe- 
rience to represent the 
university and the stu- 
dent body as well as the 



Chief Illiniwek tradi- 
tion. The judging panel 
consisted of ex-Chiefs, 
student leaders and uni- 
versity officials. Finalists 
also went through an in- 
terview session where 
they were asked ques- 
tions about their desire 
to be the Chief and if 
they could handle the 
time committment. 



Alternative Spring Break 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■KIMEIMl 

U of I students had AIDS issues, youth de- 
an alternative option velopment, Native 
for their spring break American and environ- 
plans this year. Alter- mental concerns and 
native Spring Break is affordable housing, 
a YMCA not-for-profit In order to partici- 
program that offers stu- pate in the program, 
dents opportunities to students were required 
volunteer in six cities to fill out an applica- 
across the country. tion. Students were al- 

The areas students lowed to request which 

could volunteer for in- trip they wanted to at- 

eluded urban develop- tend, but ASB tried to 

ment, migrant farm la- match people with the 

bor issues, gay, les- destination where they 

bian. bisexual and would benefit the most. 



^s^$«^5^ 



^ 






Coed floor 

■■■■— 1^— II llll ■ 

Plans to offer a room-by-room coed 
floor in Hopkins Residence Hall were 
put on hold due to complications in the 
proposal process. In order for a truly 
coed floor to exist, a proposal would 
have to be approved by the University 
Board of Trustees and by University 
Housing. Then, various public relations 
methods would have to be taken. 

Interest in the floor was close to 50 
females and 50 males when the proposal 
process was put on hold. 



rise in crime 

According to the University Police De- 
partment, in 1994 drug and narcotic of- 
fenses went up and criminal damage to 
property went down. 

The department released a report in Feb- 
ruary that stated that the number of overall 
reported crimes on campus rose 3.1 percent 
in 1994. Drug and narcotic offenses had 
the most striking increase for 1994. Most of 
the reports came from University Resi- 
dence Halls because of better communica- 
tion between community police officers 
assigned to the halls and resident advisors . 

One crime on campus that goes relatively 
unreported is sexual assualt. The number of 
reported sexual assaults in 1994 was four for 
the whole campus. The majority of sexual 
assaults occur between aquaintances. Vic- 
tims are encouraged to report the crime to 
the University Police Department. They 
can also contact McKinley Health Center 
and the Office of Women's Programs for 
counseling and assistance. 



Bromley starts recycling 



Because of the hard work of 
concerned residents, Bromley 
Hall, located at 910 S. Third St. 
in Champaign, has implemented 
a new recycling program. 

The new program started in 
late January and included the 
recycling of aluminum and steel 
cans, plastic, glass, newspaper 
and office paper. 



WXMM* 

The new system was imple- 
mented because the previous 
system was limited and inef- 
fective. The program involves 
recycling centers on each floor 
and a main area where the 
products will be picked up by 
the Community Recycling Cen- 
ter, located at 720 N. Market 
St., Champaign. 



Apartment building completed 



IBSBBBSa 



Many students on campus were 
left wondering just when their 
apartments, which were schedided 
to be finished before the fall semester 
began, were going to be completed. 

The new apartment complex, 
constructed by Campus Properties 
Management at 202 E. Chalmers 
St., Champaign, was supposed to 
be finished before the beginning of 
the school year in August of 1994. 

When classes began and the 
apartments were not finished, the 



lessees were notified and led to be- 
lieve they would be put up in a hotel 
for only a few weeks until the apart- 
ments were finished. 

Esther Patt, director of the Ten- 
ant Union, said Campus Proper- 
ties Management had the most com- 
plaints against them of any land- 
lord hi 1994. They received the 
second-most complaints of a single 
landlord on record. 

The building was finally ruled fit 
for occupancy on Jan. 19, 1995. 




New cable services 



masKza 



Time Warner Cable added six 
new channels to its basic cablepack- 
age as part of the Gateway system 
upgrade. Three of the channels 
were added on Feb. 1, and were 
accompanied by a 97 cent rate in- 
crease. The three channels included 



"Country Music Television," "Court 
TV" and "Z Music Television". When 
the system is completed it will add 
"The Learning Channel," "The TV 
Food Network" and "E! Entertain- 
ment Television" at the additional 
cost of 60 cents per subscriber. 



cli 



ungs 



^■■■■■■^^■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■i^MMBHMBBBBBBBBH 



New campus bars 






Two local bars changed their formats this 
year to better suit the needs of college stu- 
dents. The bar formerly known as Q'Malleys 
is now called Six Feet Undei*, located at 313 
E. Green St., Champaign. The new owners, 
Glen Barnett and John Czhakowski, changed 
the format to "alternative" because they 
wanted their establishment to be "something 
new in town." They chose to discontinue the 
former bar's traditional playing of "Ameri- 
can Pie" every night at midnight. 

Another Campustown bar that changed 
its name and format but kept its owners was 
Gully's Riverview Inn, located at 306 1/2 E. 
Green St., now known as The Library. The 
bar's decor revolves around a library motif 
and offers a deli^type food service and 16 
types of beer on tap. 



Common Ground 

One alternative to the dilemma of super- 
market shopping, whether your problems 
are financial or political, is the Common 
Ground Food Co-op located inside the Illi- 
nois Disciples Foundation, located at 403 S. 
Wright St., Champaign. Founded in 1978, 
Common Ground is truly a cooperative, with 
the majority of the work being shared by the 
members who in return receive discounts for 
their purchases and a share in the leadership 
of the co-op. 




ni Hie photc 



Police Reports 



Four victims reported seeing a naked man in their apart- 
ment building at 104 N. Lincoln Ave. The victims stated that 
a man was wandering around their stairwell completely 
naked except for a shirt wrapped around his face and head. 
The incident had occured more than once for about a week, 
but no one thought to report the incident to authorities. 

A trespasser entered a university student's apartment in 
the 200 block of East John St. , according to a Champaign 
Police report. The victim went to bed at 2 a.m. and was 
awakened a while later by movement in her bed . She woke 
up to find a man, who she did not know, lying in her bed 
next to her. The victim asked the man who he was and he 
replied, "It's me, Thomas," according to the report. The 
victim jumped out of bed and the offender ran westbound 
on John Street. The offender was later apprehended and 
made the comment that he was in town visiting his sister 
and mistook the apartments. 

A man walked into Covenant Medical Center, located at 
1400 W.Park St., Urbana, and assumed the role of an X-ray 
technician because he thought the hospital was short-staffed, 
according to an Urbana Police report. The man walked into 
the hospital, donned a pair of scrubs and picked up a pager 
as he attempted to play the part of an X-ray technician, the 
report said. The man told police the hospital did not have 
any X-ray technicians on duty and that he wanted to help. 

A man was seen placing packages of meat in his pants at 
County Market, located at 1914 Glenn Park Drive, 
Champaign, according to a Champaign Pohce report. An 
employee observed a man who had been in the meat 
department and looked suspicious, according to the re- 
port. The employee thought the man was suspicious when 
he took two packages of meat from the basket and stuffed 
them inside his pants. 

A suspect was arrested in connection with public inde- 
cency at JC Penney in Market Place Mall, located at 200 
N. Neil St. , Champaign, according to a Champaign Pohce 
report. A woman had complained about a man "exposing 
himself" in the Juniors Department. A security guard 
found the suspect perusing items and noticed that the 
man's shirt tails were hanging out. It was not apparent if 
the man's penis was protruding from his pants under- 
neath the shirt tails. According to the report the suspect 
eventually entered the Women's department and mastur- 
bated on the clothes and fondled himself. When arrested, 
the suspect was in possession of a pair of shoelaces and 
petroleum jelly, according to the report. 



TBHBHBMHHHBBBBBBT 



I Ex-hostage addresses students 






EBiami 




Former hostage Terry 
Waite spoke at Foellinger Au- 
ditorium in October about ter- 
rorism and his own ordeals. 

Waite recounted his entire 
involvement with the hostage 
crisis, including when he was 
an envoy for the archbishop 
of Canterbury. 

Waite said he got involved 
in hostage negotiations during 
the 1980s Lebanese hostage 
crisis. When the Iran-Contra 
affair broke, terrorists found 
Waite to be more useful as a 
hostage than a negotiator. In 
January 1987, Waite was 
taken hostage. 

For the first nine months 



— Daily Illini file photo 

of his incarceration, Waite 
said he was chained hand and 
foot, blindfolded and had to 
lie on the floor while being 
constantly interrogated. 

Waite said the worst part of 
the interrogation was being 
beaten on the soles of his feet 
with wire cables. 

For three more years, 
Waite said he was bound and 
placed in solitary confine- 
ment. He did mental arith- 
metic and mentally composed 
a book to stay alert. When he 
was released, he wrote out 
his story longhand. This 
story became Waite's book, 
"Taken on Trust." 



Wingers featured on "Today" 



A new Campustown busi- 
ness, A.J. Wingers, located at 
612 E. Daniel St. , Champaign, 
was featured on the "Today" 
show in late August. 

The show decided to do 
a story on young entrepre- 
neurs, and A.J. Wingers 
was one of the three busi- 
nesses highlighted. 

The owners, Adam Cohen 
and Jeff Weinstein, were in- 
terviewed by Tabitha Soren 



for the show. "Today" 
wanted to show Generation 
X-ers and recent college 
graduates who were able to 
find success. 

A.J. Wingers was started by 
university alums Weinstein 
and Cohen because they felt 
that the campus was in need 
of a restaurant like A.J. 
Wingers. The two seized the 
opportunity and opened 
their own business. 



Retail changes 

■■■■■■■■■■■■MBHESSIfMfl 

The Thunderbird Theatre on Goodwin 
Avenue in Urbana showed its last movie on 



Oct. 7, 1994. The theater was closed down 
because the costs were too high to maintain a 
one-screen theatre. The Thunderbird was 
closed once before because of financial rea- 
sons and was reopened in hopes of doing 
better. Due to financial difficulties, the the- 
atre was forced to close again. 

Another area business that closed down 
was Coslow's restaurant next to Johnstown 
Center in Champaign. It was scheduled to 
reopen in February of 1995 as the St. Louis 
Bread Co., a full line bakery and cafe offer- 
ing everything from muffins to espresso to 
soup and salads. 



Case dismissed 



Auk. 22, 1994 



Christopher Reincke, the university stu- 
dent who threatened President Bill Clinton 
through e-mail last spring, had the charges 
against him dismissed in August after several 
months of probation. 

Reineke's message under the alias 
"AIIJVnGHTY@NEVER.GONNA.CATCH.ME," 
read: "I am curious, Bill, how wouldyou feel 
about being the first president to be killed on 
the same day as his wife. It would be best, I 
think, to not continue with your immediate 
plans. Perhaps a vacation. You will die soon. 
You can run but you can't hide." It was 
signed "Overlord." 



• 



■■■■■■■^^^■■■■■^■^■■■■■■■■■M 



Hasli Wednesday 



BlBMBa 



An estimated 800 people gathered on the Quad 
this year for Hash Wednesday. Since 1973, Hash 
Wednesday has heen held on the third Wednesday in 
April with marijuana advocates touting the drug's 
environmental and medicinal merits. The annual 
celehration is organized to push for the legalization 
of the drug. 

Present at the day-long event were supporters 
of the drug's medical henefits. A local resident 
spoke about his battle with Hodgkin's disease 
and how he has been using the drug through a 
legal prescription. He claimed it improved his 
immune system and eliminated some of the nau- 
sea felt as a side effect of chemotherapy. 

Opponents of marijuana also were there to argue 
that some of the claims made by speakers that day 
were false. One Urbana resident argued that mari- 
juana has the potential to do serious brain damage. 

The efforts of the event were mainly directed 
toward the students who have not had a Registered 
Student Organization for marijuana legalization 
since Students for the Legalization of Marijuana was 
disbanded in 1993. 




-D^ily Mini file photc 



Campus concerts 




Financial Aid Hotline 



Gov. Jim Edgar de- 
clared February Finan- 
cial Aid Admissions 
Awareness Month in 
hopes of making college 
students aware of the fi- 
nancial assistance avail- 
able to them. 

The Illinois Student 
Assistance Commission 
offered a financial aid 
"Helpline" during the 
week of Feb. 13-17. 
About 125 volunteers 
from high schools, uni- 
versities and lending 



commissions answered 
questions concerning fi- 
nancial aid. The hotline 
averaged about one 
phone call a minute . Dur- 
ing the last five years that 
it has been in operation, 
more than 14,800 calls 
have been received. 

The campaign was di- 
rected mainly toward 
prospective students but 
students who were al- 
ready enrolled in college 
were eligible for assis- 
tance as well. 



Racist flyers 

Racist and anti- 
Seme tic flyers surfaced 
on campus on two sepa- 
rate occasions during the 
fall semester. The first 
set of flyers were distrib- 
uted to the Black Law 
S tudents Association and 
the second wave were 
posted illegally on bulle- 
tin boards in Noyes Lab, 
the Education Building, 
the Law Building and 



Lincoln Hall. 

Some of the flyers said 
Jewish people do not eat 
pork because they aren't 
"cannibals" while other 
flyers questioned African 
Americans' souls and 
civdness. A hotline num- 
ber given on the flyer led 
to a recorded message by 
the national leader of the 
White Americans Party 
in East Peoria. 



Coming out rally 



Gays, lesbians and bisexuals celebrated Na- 
tional Coming Out Day on the Quad on Oct. 11, 
1994. Two hundred people attended the rally and 
welcomed community members who were coming 
out for the first time. 

The rally had an open microphone so anyone 
wishing to tell a story could share it with others. 
Several people shared their stories and took the 
opportunity to come out in front of the crowd. 

The large turnout was indicative of how visible 
the gay, lesbian and bisexual community is will- 
ing to be and also how many heterosexual sup- 
porters there are. Many of the supporters, or 
"Allies," are part of the Ally program sponsored 
through the counseling center. 




Dail) Illini file pliott: 



Student voters stayed home 



EBBESB33I 



Some Democratic can- 
didates defeated in the No- 
vember elections placed 
part of the blame on low 
student turnout at the 
polls. However, the num- 
ber of students who voted 



was not a shock when com- 
pared to previous years. 
The highest student turn- 
outs have been recorded 
during presidential elec- 
tion years. 

The low turnout was 



partly attributed to the 
fact that many students 
do not consider Cham- 
paign-Urbana their home 
and choose to vote by ab- 
sentee ballot in their par- 
ents' districts. 



Dai! 



mini 




I 



eing a U of I student involves more than just the mechanical 

motions of waking up in the morning, going to required 

classes, coming home, doing homework, then going to bed, 

just to do it all over again the next day. If life on campus were 

that monotonous and dull, there would be no opportunity for us 

to grow and develop as individuals and as a community. Fortunately, university life is 

far from dull and boring. We are in a constant state of change and flux. 

By the time we leave the U of I, we will have seen many changes on campus, and we will 
have gone through many degrees of change in our own personal lives. There are many 
opportunities for us to grow in directions never before imagined. From formal organizations 
like the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, to more laid back groups such as those found at 
the Newman Foundation or within the Association for Computing Machinery, to an all- 
encompassing living and learning environment like Unit One, there are many activities at 
the U of I that help foster continuing personal development. 

While we undergo these never-ending changes, we can be comforted by the fact that there 
are many people that have come before us, sharing very similar experiences. Teaching 
assistants, for example, are students themselves, and thus understand their students' 
position much more easily. 

Another example is the outstanding professors who demonstrate empathy for their 
students, doing what they can with their knowledge and experience to make the learning 
process less of a chore. Many professors continually try to incorporate new and innovative 
ideas to make the classroom experience more enjoyable. One innovation that has been taken 
to new heights is to take students out of the traditional classroom altogether. Instead of 
sitting in desks taking notes written by a teacher on a blackboard, students can now be found 
out in a field judging animals, in a lab building a solar-powered car, inside a semiformal 
Japanese tea room observing a Japanese tea ceremony or in a state of the art computer lab 
receiving immediate audio-visual feedback over a computer network. 

On a larger scale, the campus as a whole has experienced many degrees of change. 
Construction on campus is a familiar sight as the U of I continues to expand its physical 
makeup. In other areas, however, the university is downsizing: the Institute of Aviation is 
already feeling the effects of budget cuts, with the aircraft maintenance program branching 
out in other directions outside of the university. Moving forward, the U of I is changing with 
technology as we say good-bye to the old ritual of on-campus registration at the Armory and 
we say hello to the possibilities that come with on-line registration over a computer network. 

Truly, academic life at the university is far from static, dull and boring. We are a part of 
a dynamic community that is forging ahead on the intellectual frontier. In the process, we 
are not just learning more about our respective majors, but more about ourselves as well. 
We leave the U of I with more than just textbook knowledge. We leave with the knowledge 
that we have impacted our world in some way, and in return, we have undergone many 
immeasurable degrees of change. 



DEGREES OF 




Carol Frantilla 
Academics Editor 



"The Up All Night 

Crew" 



Story by Emma Brennan Layout by Suk Ju Yun 



The Association for Computing Machinery 
(ACM) is an academic organization that is 
sponsored by the Department of Computer 
Science. Although the majority of its two 
hundred members come from computer science 
and engineering backgrounds, the group is 
very diverse, with some members majoring in 
philosophy and biology, among other fields. 
The U of Fs ACM is one of hundreds of student- 
based ACM organizations across the countiy. 
Started in 1955, its original purpose was to 
establish a group where people with a common 
interest in computers could come together and 
socialize. Today, ACM serves many purposes 
for students at the U of I. 

"ACM has given me the opportunity to work 
on projects that go beyond what I am able to 
do in my computing classes. It also has given 
me the chance to interact with students who 
have similar interests, as well as giving me an 
excuse to play with Legos," said Amy Ryan, 
senior in Engineering. 

ACM hosts a wide variety of activities for its 
members throughout the year. It has eleven 
special interest groups (SIG's) and sponsors 
the new Linux user's group. These groups 
allow students to interact with others who 
share similar interests. They focus on topics 
ranging from computer architecture to graphics 
to artificial intelligence. These groups meet 
weekly to work on a variety of projects which 
include an electronic scrolling sign, a computer 
made of Legos, a networked weather station 
and networked battle games, to name a few. 
Special workshops open to the entire campus 
are also sponsored by these groups. In the 
past, these workshops have covered topics 
like Mosaic, Unix and Linux and computer 
graphics. The 27 board members of ACM meet 
weekly to discuss future projects and activities. 



In addition to working on computer-related 
projects, ACM is also a social group. Group 
outings are planned throughout the year, with 
midnight Frisbee on the Quad, picnics, paintball 
and rollerblading being some of their more 
popular activities. ACM is also currently 




homework problems or even to give advice for 
personal dilemmas. 

Most students involved in ACM feel that 
the organization is a good resource because 
it helps students get to know others who 
share their interests and it also allows them 
to share their information. Because the 
organization is so large, it is possible for 
members to pool their resources to reach 
solutions for problems and come up with 
ideas for future projects. 

ACM puts out a monthly newsletter, Banks 
of the Boneyard, which is distributed 
throughout the campus. The average 
circulation of this publication is one thousand' 
issues each month. Included in these' 
newsletters is information about jobs that 
ACM members know about, current events 
that pertain to computers and updates on 
each of the eleven special interest groups.; 
An application for membership in ACM is 
attached to the back of every issue of Banks, 
of the Boneyard. 

Membership in ACM is open to everyone. 
General meetings are held monthly, so 
interested students have the opportunity to 
stop by and see if ACM is something in which 
they would like to get involved. Guest speakers 
from the U of I and from local corporations 

BvdndoTl Long appear at these meetings. In addition to these 

speakers, special interest group updates and 
news on upcoming social events are conveyed i 
to the members. 

"ACM is a collection of people from a 
variety of majors who share a common interest 
in computing. We come together to play on the i 
frontier of technology and attempt to see what 
we can do with our limited resources and not- 
so-limited knowledge," said Brandon Long ' 
corporate liaison and senior in Engineering. 



"We come together 
to play on the 

frontier of 
technology and 
attempt to see 
what we can do 
with our limited 
resources and not- 
so-limited- 
knowledge. y 




attempting to put together an intramural hockey 
team. The ACM office boasts the motto "The 
Up All Night Crew" because no matter what 
time of the day you stop by the office in the 
Digital Computer Lab, there are usually people 
around who are willing to offer help on 



idemics 





Brian Bielick, freshman in Enginering, uses a soldering iron to 
assemble LEDs for a scrolling sign project called Medusa. This 
special interest group, SigArch, is one of twelve special interest 
groups rhat are a part of ACM. 

Jonathan Stark, senior in Engineering, talks to another ACM 
member about a server problem on his computer. ACM members 
spend time on computers for programming projects that have 
been discussed in special interest groups. 



Association for Computing Machinery 107 



Being All 
That They Can Be 



Story by Emma Brennan ci Layout by Ryan Almon 



Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) 
programs prepare students for officer 
responsibilities in the Army, Air Force, Navy or 
Marines. ROTC programs are offered at hundreds 
of universities throughout the country, and 
they have been an integral part of the U of I 
since the school was established in 1867. 

Each year, about four hundred students 
participate in the ROTC programs on campus. 
At the end of each year over sixty students 
complete the program and go on to receive 
commissions. Students in the ROTC program 
come from a wide variety of majors on campus 
and many of the participants are involved in 
many other activities on campus besides ROTC. 

Students who become involved with ROTC 
have the opportunity to decide how much of a 
role they want it to play in their lives, obligating 
themselves to a time commitment that matches 
their desire for involvement. 

Most members of the different ROTC programs 
start their four years in the program. Some 
students come to the University with either a 
three or a four year scholarship that pays for 
tuition, books and fees. In addition, scholarship 
students receive one hundred dollars a month 
spending money. There is also an opportunity 
for students who decide to join the program once 
they reach the campus to get involved as non- 
scholarship participants. These students follow 
the same course of action as the other ROTC 
members, without the financial incentive. The 
program strives to challenge students and prepare 
them for successful futures, but at the same time 
not interfere with college requirements. 

"ROTC has been the most fulfilling part of 

my college experience. I have learned more 

about management and leadership skills in 

C than I have in any class on this campus. 

have found that whatever you put into ROTC 

'ou get out ten-fold," said Jennifer Bashaw, 



junior in LAS. 

When students make a full commitment to 
ROTC, they have the choice to follow the one, 
two or four year program, depending on which 
branch of ROTC they are involved. A two year 
program allows transfer students the opportunity 




"I look at ROTC as 

more than just an 

adventure - it's free 

tuition! It is also an 

experience in lasting 

friendships and 

leadership skills 

that last beyond 

the military. y 

— Gilbert Dysico 




to experience ROTC. The majority of participants 
follow the four year program, in which the first 
two years are spent taking general classes on 
military science and military history and the last 
two years focusing on a specialized course of 
study pertinent to that person's future plans, 
with classes emphasizing leadership and 
managerial skills. 

Most students are attracted to the program 
because they desire to become disciplined and 



dedicated defenders of the United States. 
Another incentive that draws students to the 
ROTC program is the scholarship and financial 
aid packages that are offered. 

"I look at ROTC as more than just an 
adventure - it's free tuition! It is also an 
experience in lasting friendships and leadership 
skills that last beyond the military," said Gilbert 
Dysico, junior in LAS. 

Although it varies for each branch, a student 
makes an obligation to ROTC when he or she 
accepts a federal scholarship or enters into the 
advanced courses of study. This obligation 
requires the student to serve as an officer on 
reserve or active duty after graduation. Initial 
duty obligation is a minimum of four years. 

Besides training people to protect our 
country, the ROTC program also helps students i 
to build life-long friendships. Teamwork is a . 
subject that is highly emphasized in ROTC, 
therefore close bonds are formed between 
participants in each branch. Weekend and 
summer activities are held each year to promote 
unity among ROTC members. Social events are 
also held each year, including an annual Military 
Ball and Dining-Ins, which are formal military 
dinners. In addition, ROTC members get 
involved in organizations and activities on 
campus such as intramural sports, weightlifting 
clubs and a ROTC newspaper and yearbook 
which further allows them to expand upon 
their leadership and cooperation skills. 

"I feel that ROTC is a veiy worthwhile 
program. I joined because you are guaranteed 
a job right out of school, and even if you don't 
decide to make the military your life, it is easier 
to get a regular job because employers highly 
desire the management and leadership skills 
that students acquire through their participation 
in ROTC," said Brian Bone, sophomore in 
Engineering. 



nics 



■ 








Mark Alessia, junior in Education, and Thomas Wachtel, 
sophomore in ALS, perform stretching exercises before their 
early morning run. Some of the ROTC programs require their 
students to work out one or more times a week. 

Nathan Kennedy, freshman in Engineering and a Midshipman 
Fourth Class, and Will Weiland, junior in Engineering and a 
Midshipman Second Class, participate in a flag raising 
ceremony on the west side of the Atmory. The ROTC units 
share the responsibility of raising and lowering the flag. 




i 




Reserve Officer Training Corps 109 





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v~ 



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10 Academics 



— Man Grono 



Campus Gets a Facelift 



Story by Emma Brennan Layout by Anna Nommensen 



When students receive their increased tuition 
■ills each year, they often wonder what exactly 
5 done with the money they pay. The 
onstruction of new buildings and the 
^novation of existing buildings is one area in 
/hich a lot of money is spent. Many of the 
rojects that involve structural changes on 
ampus are long-term, therefore they require a 
reat deal of funding. For the 1994-95 school 
ear, much work was done on the campus, 
/ith a focus on the engineering campus and 
le renovation of many of the older buildings. 

Across the street from Krannert, on Goodwin 
nd Oregon in Urbana, construction continued 
lis year on the new Chemical and Life Sciences 
luilding. Work was begun on this site several 
ears ago, and the expected date of completion 
; in late 1995- The main purpose for this new 
uilding will be to provide additional facilities 
Dr students and faculty to conduct laboratory 
^search in the fields of microbiology and cell 
nd structural biology. 

A new architecture building was also in the 
/orks in the 1994-1995 year. Located on Loredo 
'aft Drive across from the current architecture 
uilding, the Temple Hoyne Buelle Building is 
xpected to be completed by 1996. This facility 
/ill provide additional studio space for 
rchitecture students to work on their projects, 
/ith an emphasis on landscape architecture 
nd urban and regional planning. 

"When I heard that they were building a new 
rchitecture building I was very happy because 
ew studio space is definitely needed. I just 
ope it is done by the time I'm a senior," said 
licole Jackman, sophomore in FAA. 

Construction on the Law Building was also 
ompleted this year, with the re-dedication of 
le addition of the third floor wing taking place 
arly in the fall semester. This work took one 

he construction site of the Chemical and Life Sciences Building 
n Goodwin Avenue is illuminated during this long nighttime 
cposure. The main purpose for this new building will be to 
rovide additional facilities for students and faculty to conduct 
boratory research in the fields of microbiology and cell and 
ructural biology. 



and one-half years to complete, and the 
additional space will mainly serve as office 
space for faculty and staff. 

The greatest structural changes on campus 




7 think they might 

have gone a little 

overboard in their 

spending, but at 

least the end 

product is 

something that 

people from all 

over the campus 

can e?ijoy. " 

— Alvaro Reyes 




this year occurred north of Green Street. The 
engineering campus was the focus of most 
of the money spent on renovations. The 
official completion of the Grainger Library 
occurred in the Fall semester, with the formal 
dedication of the library by the Grainger 
Foundation taking place on October 14th, 
1994. Additional landscaping and 



modification completed the work that was 
begun on the library last school year. 

"Even though I am not an engineering 
major, I still appreciate the Grainger Library 
because I find it a veiy cozy and warm 
atmosphere that is very conducive to studying. 
I think they might have gone a little overboard 
in their spending, but at least the end product 
is something that people from all over the 
campus can use and enjoy," said Alvaro Reyes, 
sophomore in LAS. 

Construction on the Superconductivity 
Building in the engineering campus also took 
place this year. This facility connects the 
Engineering Sciences Building to the Materials 
Research Lab. The purpose of the 
Superconductivity Building is to house the 
superconductivity program and also to extend 
the scope of the Materials Research Lab. 

In addition to the construction of new 
buildings, major renovations took place in 
many of the buildings on the engineering 
campus. For example, the Engineering 
Sciences Building was altered to 
accommodate its use by other departments. 
The wheelchair accessibility of this building 
was also improved along with the addition 
of air conditioning to many of the rooms. 

One of the major projects in the engineering 
campus that continued this year was the work 
on the Engineering Quadrangle. Before World 
War I, Professor James M. White, the supervising 
architect, came up with the idea of constructing 
a quadrangle on the north campus to facilitate 
the needs of the increasing numbers of 
engineering students on campus. Although his 
plans were not executed at that time, his ideas 
for the engineering campus were brought up 
again in 1986. 

(story continued on page 112) 



Campus Construction 111 



(story continued from page 111) 

A proposal was approved for the gradual 
replacement of the streets and parking between 
Green Street, Springfield Avenue, Wright Street 
and Mathews Avenue with a four-acre 
quadrangle, including two new buildings. To 
facilitate these changes, the destruction of eight 
dysfunctional buildings on the engineering 
campus was necessary. Upon completion, this 
quadrangle will be one-third the size of the 
central campus Quad, and it will serve as the 
central location for the College of Engineering. 

The planned landscaping for the new 
quadrangle consists of trees and a lawn, with a 
new walkway for students where Burrill Avenue 
used to exist. New bridges will also be installed 
across the Boneyard Creek, the stream running 
through the engineering campus. Additional 
proposed changes for this stream include 
making the channel deeper to prevent the 
likelihood of flooding and the return of the 
creek to a meandering alignment with its banks 
lined with natural stones. 

Besides the additions to the engineering 
campus, classrooms around U of I saw changes 
this year. Multimedia equipment was added to 
many classrooms to allow students the 
opportunity to more efficiently and effectively 
receive information from their instructors. Also, 
many of the older buildings on campus faced 
renovations to bring them up to safety codes. 

Plans for future changes on the campus also 
include the addition of an agriculture library 
and the further reconstruction of many of the 
existing buildings that still need work. 

"In the future, I would hope that the U of I 
would spend some money on the recreational 
facilities, especially at Campus Recreation 
Center-East (CRCE). I think it would be money 
well spent if they added a pool and an outdoor 
track to CRCE, and I'm sure other students 
would also be happy with these changes," said 
Colleen Brown, junior in LAS. 

"In my opinion, too much money is being 
spent for certain departments. I think money 
should be spent more equally throughout all of 
the colleges on campus. I also think it would be 
a good idea if U of I spent some money to build 
a parking garage on campus," said Skippy 
Ginsberg, junior in LAS. 

112 Academics 




S^PB^m 




— Peggy Gibbons 
Detour signs decorate the corner of Sixth and 
Armory during the many construction projects 
of Fall 1994. Although much of the construction 
occurred on the main campus, most of the 
money was spent on the renovations of the 
engineering campus. 

Bricklayers work on the Chemical and Life 
Sciences Laboratory on Goodwin Avenue. 
Construction is due to be completed on the 
building in late 1996. 



Campus Construction 113 



U of I Direct 



Story by Emma Brennan c Layout by Sukju Yun 



U of I Direct, better known as on-line 
registration, is a program that allows U of I 
students to register for classes over the campus 
computer network, UlUCnet. Beginning in 
April of 1995, students have the opportunity to 
select their classes for the 1995 Summer Sessions 
and 1995 Fall Semester through the use of 
computers across campus, including CCSO 
sites, residence hall sites and personal computers 
with modems. 

"It is about time U of I got the on-line system. 
Many smaller and less-prestigious universities 
have had it for several years. I am definitely 
looking forward to not spending many wasted 
hours within the congested confines of our 
beloved Armory," said Brandon Melbye, 
junior in LAS. 

Patterned after the University of Iowa's 
system, U of I Direct allows up to two hundred 
students to select classes at any given time. 
Prior to registration, students receive instructions 
on how to utilize the on-line system, with 
instructions appearing on the front page of the 
Timetable. "Earliest Registration Times" are 
issued to each student, showing them the first 
possible time they could go to sign up for their 
classes. These times are assigned according to 
the number of hours a student has completed. 

Jeffrey Grim, senior in LAS and student 
coordinator for U of I Direct said, "I worked on 
organizing and leading student groups for the 
on-line system. We created the screens that the 
students see when they use the system to 
register. We made them clear and easy to 
use, and so far the student response has 
been very positive." 

Prior to registration, the Timetable is entered 
into the computer system. Through the on-line 
system, the Timetable is hooked up directly to 
each college, department and administrative 
office so that classes could be dropped from 
the list of offerings the minute they are closed. 



This up-to-the-minute listing allows students to 
know immediately which classes they have 
been admitted into. This system also allows 
departments to add or drop classes from the 
Timetable when they see what kind of demand 
exists for a given course. 

Every student at the U of I is issued a 
network identification and password that allows 
them access to the system. A twenty-minute 




"I am definitely 

looking forward to 

not spending 

many wasted 

hours within the 

congested confines 

of our beloved 

Armory. 

— Brandon Melbye 




time slot is granted for each student to register, 
but the estimated time of registration is only 
five to ten minutes. Students are limited to 
choosing eighteen hours or less of classes, 
unless they receive special permission from 
their college. 

In order to ensure that students consulted 
an advisor prior to course selection, access 
to on-line registration, in some cases, is 



restricted until an advisor has confirmed a| 
student's consultation appointment. This 
process of blocking students from the on- 
line system is also used to prohibit 
encumbered students from registering until 
they meet their academic, financial and 
disciplinary obligations. 

In order to ensure that no problems occurred 
in April, when the first group was scheduled to 
go on-line, testing of the system began in 
November of 1994. Three groups of students 
were selected to help test the system, with the 
goal being to see what kind of a load the 
program could handle without overloading. 
Testing started out with a group of thirty 
students, and the groups got progressively 
larger to test the system's limits. The testers; 
were given scripted schedules and were asked 
to sign up for their assigned classes and then 
attempt to make adjustments. 

Jason DeHaan, U of I Direct Workstation 
Supporter, played an integral role in the 
testing of the system. "Our first stress test 
was very successful. We strived to break the 
application and look for any possible 
problems. We ran into a few minor problems, 
but those were mainly errors of entry, and 
not real problems with the system," said 
DeHaan. 

The new on-line system is different from the 
old registration method in that students make 
their actual schedules for the next semester, 
and do not just select classes that they hope to 
take. This system gives students immediate 
feedback, but it also requires more responsibility 
on the part of the student, who has to keep 
track of his or her current credits. 

"I think the new system of registering will be 
much more efficient. I will have more confidence 
when I make my schedule in the future because 
I will know right away if I got my classes," said 
Becky Sliva, sophomore in LAS. 



114 Academics 




HP.F5 



Many University students stay stagnant in lines while others buzz 
through on-campus registration at the Armory in the Fall of 1 994. 
This madness should be over in the Fall of 1995 when on-line 
registration is implemented. 

Derik Fay, freshman in LAS, helps tear down and clean up the 
Armory after on-campus registration in January. U of I Direct, 
the University's on-line registration system, will replace the hectic 
Armory procedures of the past. 




On-Line Registration 115 



The Clock is Ticking 

Story by Emma Brennan a —'^ > Layout by Angle Montgomery 



There are a lot of things a college student 
of the nineties has to think about: classes, 
homework, sleep, exercise, a social life and 
extra-curricular activities. Some students also 
have to worry about earning money to pay 
for tuition. A person's success in college as 
well as in life greatly depends on how welL 
they manage their time. Freshmen entering 
the U of I are often overwhelmed by how 
much there is to do, and by how much 
freedom they have. This is often the first time 
in their lives when they do not have their 
parents telling them to get off the phone and 
do their homework, so some students have 
trouble getting things started. This is why 
many freshmen fall into the dreaded 
PROCRASTINATION TRAP. 

Bobby Blinn, freshman in CBA, is a victim 
of this trap. "In the first two weeks of 
classes, I didn't do a thing. Now, I am 
studying the night before a test and I am 
doing my homework assignments at the last 
minute. So far, this strategy has been working 
well for me, but then again I haven't got any 
grades back yet," said Blinn. 

Although the experts tell students to take 
control of their lives, to start all of their 
assignments early, to avoid time wasters and 
to avoid putting things off to the last minute, 
some experienced seniors are die-hard 
procrastination advocates. "While there have 
been some stressful moments, procrastination 
has successfully gotten me through my first 



three years on this campus," said Amy 
Gustafson, senior in CBA. 

Dennis Vidoni, a time management 
counselor in the Student Services Building, 
tells people that time management is a very 
"personal problem," and that there is no one 
answer that is right for everyone. In his 




/ try to manage my 

time by staying 

involved in activities, 

but not spreading 

myself too thin. y 

— Lisa Rosenfeld 




experience, however, he has found that 
students often run into problems when "they 
don't set priorities and when they think 
everything in their life is equally important. 
They need to have a clear idea of what needs 
to be done, and then they need to do it." 

This might sound like good advice, but it is 
often hard to get motivated to start that term 



paper that is due in three months when sleep 
is such a tempting alternative. Some studentf 
combat procrastination by filling up theii 
schedules with many activities so they will nol 
have any time to waste. Jerry King, a sophomore 
who is double-majoring in engineering and 
psychology, follows this philosophy. As a 
student who is currently taking twenty-five 
academic hours of classes and who acts as an 
Engineering Learning Assistant for ENG 100, 
King finds "that when you have a lot of things 
to do, you don't have time to goof off. Therefore, 
you have to set your priorities straight, and 
work more efficiently towards your goals." 

This plan may work for some, but those 
less involved students prefer to have some 
free time to relax. How do they manage to 
get everything done? Most try to allot some 
of their day to studying and some to relaxing 
and having fun. That way, they do not stress 
themselves out or get burnt out too easily., 
Another popular strategy is for students to 
set goals for themselves, and then to reward 
themselves when they meet their goals, with 
rewards ranging from a relaxing night of television 
viewing to an exciting night out at the bars. 

Lisa Rosenfeld, junior in LAS, tries to 
strike a balance in her life. "I try to manage my 
time by staying involved in activities, but not 
spreading myself too thin, so I still have time to 
do my homework and go out. That way, I can 
get good grades, stay involved and have fun at 
the same time!" 

Omar Jassim, sophomore in LAS, spends time reading on the 
South Quad. Jassim said that he spends about 20 hours a week 
studying for classes. 



i.16 Academics 



Demond Turner, junior in LAS, receives help with a microcassette 
recorder from JoeTucker, freshman in LAS, in the T.I. S. bookstore. 
Tucker said that his 18 hour per week work schedule actually 
benefits his time management skills. 

Matt Powers, sophomore in CBA, Philip Gibbs, junior in ALS, 
and John Tanner, senior in ALS, spend one of their Friday nights 
at R.R. Sports Grill. Chris Habel, a doorman for R.R.'s, said that 
200-250 people occupy the bar at any given moment during the 
weekend rush. 




1 



Time Management 1 17 



Time Honored Traditions 



Story by Emma Brennan < !l -^~^ Layout by Colleen Murray 



Started in the 1970s, the original purpose of 
the Japan House was to expose U of I students 
to the rich culture and traditions of Japan. 
Today, the Japan House continues to strive for 
this goal, with various classes and groups that 
incorporate many of these Japanese traditions. 

"There are many opportunities available for 
students at the Japan House. It helps to expose 
people from the campus to different aspects of 
the Japanese culture. The Japan House also 
helps to educate people from the community, - 
with tours given to groups of children from the 
local elementary schools," said Holly Ogren, a 
teaching assistant who is studying for her 
master's in East Asian studies and who is one 
of the caretakers of the Japan House. 

Located on the corner of Lincoln and 
California, the Japan House stands out from the 
surrounding houses of Urbana with its cultivated 
gardens and manicured walkways. Upon 
entering the white house, there are cubicles 
where visitors can leave their shoes, following 
the Japanese custom of removing one's shoes 
before entering a home. In Japan, the arts are 
divided up according to their level of formality, 
and thus they are also divided up by what room 
is most suitable for their display. The first floor 
of the house is divided into three main rooms: 
an informal room where the tea ceremony is 
practiced, a semiformal room from where the 
tea ceremony can be observed and a formal 
room where the Buddhist and Shinto shrines 
are located and where a Zen group meditates. 
Various Japanese articles are on display 
throughout the house, including different styles 
of chopsticks and hashi-oki (chopstick rests). 
In addition, religious items such as statues and 
scrolls can also be observed. 

Professor Kimiko Gunji is in charge of the 
Japan House and the instruction of the classes 
that are held there. A teacher of Japanese arts 
and culture for the School of Art and Design, 
Professor Gunji is also a professor of the 
Ikenobo Ikebana School in Japan, and she 
holds the highest degree in Japanese Tea 
Ceremony. An informal tea ceremony group 
meets every Monday night at the Japan House, 
and a class offered through the School of Art 



and Design called "Tea Ceremony and Zen 
Aesthetics" meets on Tuesday nights. 

In Japan, the tea ceremony is seen as a form 
of meditation, so there is no conversation 
throughout the ceremony, and instead the 
participants listen closely to the soothing sounds 
of the water being poured and the tea being 
stirred. In these classes, students learn the 
code of behavior for the sacred ceremony, 
including the proper way to greet the host, the 
correct way to hold the bowl and the suitable 
manner for showing appreciation for the tea. 
In these ceremonies, the most emphasis is 
placed on detail and form. The green tea that 




arranging group, is led by Professor Gunji, with 
the purpose of making new friends anc 
renewing old friendships through a common 
interest in flower arranging. Saturday morning 
workshops are held throughout the year, withj 
membership open to everyone. Following the! 
lectures at these workshops, members arej 
given the opportunity to make their own floweij 
arrangements, which are then critiqued by 
Professor Gunji. In the spring, Prairie Ikebana 
hosts a professor from Japan for a series of 
workshops and demonstrations for the group. 
Because membership is open to everyone, 
participants in this group are of very diverseil 
backgrounds, with a wide range of ages and 
cultures being represented. Flower arrangements 
made by members of this group can be seen on' 
display throughout the Japan House. 

Each year, several U of I students are selected 
to live in and help contribute to the upkeep of 
the Japan House, fulfilling the position of 
caretakers. Hirolo Hakoda, a junior in LAS, is 
one of the caretakers for the 1994-1995 school 
year. When she came from Japan to the U of I 
two years ago, Hakoda met Professor Gunji 
who later asked her to live in the Japan House. : 
"In return for room and board, I help keep the 
house in order and I help Professor Gunji with 
her tea classes on Monday and Tuesday nights. 

ICrfthlpPTl JCfTlYIP/Jv * am res P ons ibl e for making the sweet cookies 

that are used in the tea ceremony," said Hakoda. 

The Japan House offers many opportunities 
to U of I students to experience Japanese 
culture. Kiromi Miyakita, a sophomore in FAA, 
has taken full advantage of this opportunity: 
"My friend was taking tea ceremony class, so I 
became interested, and now I attend tea class 
on Monday. I also go to art design and meditation 
classes. I have met many people through my 
experiences and I have been able to work with 
professors. Now I help out at the Japan House 
on a volunteer basis," Miyakita said. 

Kathleen Kennedy, a sophomore in LAS, 
and a visitor to the Japan House felt that the 
cultural center was a great asset to the U of I. 
"I really appreciate the quiet, respectful 
simplicity of the Japanese culture brought to 
life by the Japan House," said Kennedy. 



"I really appreciate 

the quiet, respectful 

simplicity of the 

Japanese culture 

brought to life by the 

Japan House. ' 




is used for the ceremony is very bitter, so 
sweets are offered to the guests to offset the 
taste of the tea. 

Emily Jungheim, a sophomore in LAS and a 
first-time viewer of the tea ceremony 
commented, "I find the tea ceremony to be 
unlike anything that we have in America. 
Everything is so structured and perfect. To me, 
the tea tasted a little strange, but they told us 
that it is an acquired taste." 

In addition to the tea ceremony, classes 
offered through the art department on 
calligraphy and flower arranging are held at the 
Japan House. Prairie Ikebana, a Japanese flower 



118 Academics 




Alumna Jenny Ballsrud performs rhe Traditional Japanese Tea 
Ceremony at the Japan House Open House. In Japan, the tea 
ceremony is seen as a form of meditation. 

Alumna Tricia Gunji watches Hiromi Miyakita, sophomore in 
FAA, perform the traditional Japanese Tea Ceremony outside of 
the Japan House on Oct. 1 during the Homecoming festivities. 
The Japan House was founded to expose U of I students to the rich 
traditions of Japan. 



-Tim Hutchinson 




— Tim Hutchinson 



Japan House 119 



Riz Nicolas, senior in Engineering, enrers data from solar cell tests 
into the computer. Through participating in the Sunrayce project, 
students can receive credit from the College of Engineering. 

Alonso Acosta, senior in Engineering, sands down imperfections 
in the fiberglass of the Sunraycer solar car in a laboratory in the 
Mechanical Engineering building. The Sunrayce of 1 995 will be 
held in Colorado. 





120 Academics 



Sunguzzler 



Story by Mike Moody ~® Layout by Suk Ju Yun 



The University of Illinois is partaking in an 
ateresting race called Sunrayce '95. The 
ompetitors will be solar powered cars from 
>ver forty learning institutions from around the 
ountry. The race includes cars from such 
>reeminent engineering schools as the 
Jniversity of Michigan (the 1993 winner), 
'urdue, Stanford and the University of Texas at 
aistin as well as U of Fs very own SUNGUZZLER. 
'he race will start on June 20, 1995, in 
ndianapolis, Ind., and finish June 29, 1995, in 
iolden, Colo. The winner of the race will be 
me team that covers the distance in the shortest 
iverall time. The U of I Sunrayce team believes 
iat they will dethrone Michigan in 1995 and 
irove that the best engineering school in the 
lig Ten is not in Ann Arbor. 

Because of the experience and success 
;ained from the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) 
irogram in which students designed a dual- 
•owered car, the U of I team was selected as 
me of the pre-approved teams in the 
ompetition. The Sunrayce team is advised by 
le same two professors of the HEV program, 
'rofessor Phil Krein (Electrical and Computer 
Engineering) and Professor Robert White 
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering) along 
/ith Professor Robert Tumbull (Electrical and 
Computer Engineering). The Sunrayce team is 
;d by three graduate students. The mechanical 
~am leader is Brandon Masterson, who was 
le mechanical team leader for the HEV last 
ear. The electrical team leader is Bob Reppa. 
'he business and fundraising team leader is 
nehil Gambhir, a graduate student working 
Dward an MBA. Although the bulk of the 
unrayce team consists of engineering students, 



the business team is just as important for the 
success of the project. 

The Sunrayce program not only serves to 
promote the College of Engineering's 
premiere standing, but also benefits the 
students with this unique opportunity. 
Masterson describes the Sunrayce project as 
an "exciting engineering problem that 
addresses every aspect encountered in the 
work force." Through this project students 
can receive credit and enroll in classes given 




"Students learn how 
to apply commercially 
available technology. " 

— Bob Reppa 




by several engineering departments. The 
class is taught like a lab class with students 
attending a barrage of meetings and logging 
a journal of activities and tasks. If a student 
does not have the time for the course, they 
can volunteer and help where needed. 

Many students feel that they are learning 
practical engineering used in the corporate 
world. The electrical team leader Bob Reppa 
stated, "Students learn how to apply 
commercially available technology," that they 



normally would not be exposed to in their 
undergraduate careers. Since this is new to 
students, a lot of time can be spent on 
seemingly small details such as ordering 
parts and coordinating efforts between 
various groups. 

Ron Lacy, electrical team member and senior 
in Engineering, was certainly surprised by the 
amount of time involved. "The time management 
commitments for a specific project are 
sometimes overwhelming," said Lacy. 

The time issue tends to makes life hectic 
combined with class load and job hunting, but 
the hard work can pay off with gained 
experience. Matt Busch, student leader and 
senior in Engineering, is responsible for the 
huge task of solar cell cutting, sorting, testing 
and array construction. He believes that he is 
receiving "the type of management opportunity 
that might not come along again until ten to 
fifteen years from now." 

Many students agree that getting involved 
with a project of this enormous size and time 
scale is very demanding. Yet getting involved 
opens up the doors to what they might expect 
to encounter in the corporate world. Many 
veterans of the HEV program remember all the 
late nights and emergency repairs that caused 
many frustrations. As they look back on their 
memories, they realize how great of an 
experience they shared. These memories are 
what the U of I Sunrayce team has to look 
forward to as a payoff. Cheering wildly as the 
SUNGUZZLER arrives in Golden, Colo., the 
students will then proudly feel the satisfaction 
that all those late night sacrifices and stressful 
deadlines finally paid off. 



Sunrayce 121 



Beyond the Chalkboard 



Story by Patrick Gallot a— -^ Layout by Colleen Christensen 



It used to be that when a professor taught, 
he had his voice and he had chalk - his voice 
for lecturing to the class, and the chalk for 
writing what could not easily be spoken or 
what he wanted students to particularly take 
note of. All around campus, you can still find 
classes being taught in this manner, although 
nowadays overhead projectors, 
transparencies and colored pens have by~ 
and large replaced chalkboards and chalk in 
the larger classes. Overhead projectors are an 
improvement since it is easier to read from a 
twelve- to twenty-foot high screen than it is to 
read a chalkboard only slightly taller than the 
professor. Overall though, the whole setup is 
rather primitive and its effectiveness is arguable 
- just take a look around a lecture hall and count 
how many students have been lulled to sleep 
by the lecture. 

There is an alternative to this sometimes 
mind-numbing experience. In psychology 
terminology, it is called "elaborative rehearsal" 
according to Tess Lamb, junior in LAS. 
"Elaborative rehearsal is a process by which 
students learn a subject by being exposed to it 
in more than one form and interacting with that 
form," said Lamb. This elaborative rehearsal is 
the focus of a different type of classroom called 
a "multimedia classroom." 

Technically, a "multimedia" classroom would 
be any classroom where there is more than one 
way a professor can communicate with the 
students. For example, a music class with a 
chalkboard and a record player would fit this 
simple definition. However a multimedia 
classroom has come to mean a classroom 
outfitted with one or more computers with 
audio/visual equipment. "In that context, there 
are two types of multimedia classrooms: 
computer classrooms and specialized 
classrooms," stated Dan Vander Ploeg, assistant 
manager of the Computer and Communications 
Services Office (CCSO) computer sites. "A 
computer classroom is a classroom with a 



computer for every student and the professor, 
while a specialized classroom is one where 
only the professor has a computer but what he 
is doing with the computer can be seen by the 
entire class via an overhead projector attached 
to the computer," Vander Ploeg added. 

CCSO is playing a big part in providing the 
first type of multimedia classroom - the 
computerized classrooms - by allowing 
professors to teach in certain CCSO sites. Most 
departments of the U of I could not afford the 




"Multimedia 

classes are 

beneficial because 

the traditional 
classroom methods 
are not as efficient 
at teaching. 

— Tess Lamb 




approximately $5000 that it costs per computer 
to create their own computerized classrooms, 
so a computer lab open to anyone is often the 
easiest way for professors to get access to 
multimedia classrooms. 

Unfortunately, the sites as classrooms are in 
some ways the victims of their own success. 
Both managers of the CCSO sites are feeling 
somewhat overwhelmed with the tasks that 
come with providing support for the thirty to 
forty classes that use the sites. Fleming estimates 



that an average often new classes each semeste 
will start to use sites as classrooms. 

Another aspect that complicates CCSO', 
support of their multimedia classrooms is tha 
quite a few professors write their own software 
Each class' software has to be installed at th( 
sites and tested to make sure that it works. Thi: 
job of installing and testing thirty to fort} 
classes worth of software has to be done b} 
either one full-time technical support person o| 
four student technical support people; 
Nevertheless, both managers are supportive o 
professors writing their own software. "The} 
use commercial packages like Macromedis 
Director, Authorware or HyperCard - software 
meant for creating multimedia presentations,' 
said Vander Ploeg. 

In the future, both managers hope to add 2 
full-time liaison between themselves anq 
professors - someone who would work directly 
with professors to address their concerns and 
problems about using the sites. Vander Ploeg 
also expressed an interest in creating ar; 
experimental multimedia lab which professors 
could use to write their course's software anci 
try out commercial teaching products, something 
that cannot be done too easily with the existing sites. 

So what does this mean for students? Probably 
that more of their classes will be held in 
multimedia classrooms. "Multimedia classes 
are beneficial," said Lamb, "because the 
traditional classroom methods are not as efficient 
at teaching." Multimedia classrooms are 
powerful tools in the hands of capable 
instructors. "Everything is suited to multimedia 
- except maybe ceramics," said Lamb. 

All in all, it is sometimes hard not to wonder 
why some professors still lecture with just a 
chalkboard or an overhead projector, even in 
multimedia-capable classrooms. Fortunately 
though, more and more professors are 
demanding and taking advantage of multimedia 
classrooms. In capable hands, they are part of 
a trend that can benefit students. 



122 Academics 





— Lee Anne Paulauski 
Joon Hong, sophomore in Engineering, works at a computer in 
the multimedia computer lab in Lincoln Hall. A multimedia 
classroom has come to mean a classroom outfitted with one or 
more computers with audio/visual equipment. 

Sam Teo, senior in CBA, takes advantage of the many multimedia 
resources at the CCSO site in Lincoln Hall. CCSO is playing a big 
part in providing the first type of multimedia classroom - the 
computerized classrooms - by allowing professors to teach in 
certain CCSO sites. 



Multimedia Classrooms 123 



Spiritual 
Life on Campus 



In August 1917, Rev. John A. O'Brien 
worked with a small community of Catholics 
on the U of I campus to open a place of 
worship. This place of worship, St. John's 
Catholic Chapel, was a part of O'Brien's 
dream of a Catholic foundation on campus 
that could nurture both spiritual and social 
aspects of a person's life. Indeed, St. John's 
eventually incorporated into the Catholic 
foundation known today as the Newman 
Foundation. With a student parish of over 
3000 members, the Newman Foundation 
serves the needs of much of the Catholic 
community at the U of I. 

The Foundation functions out of St. John's 
Catholic Chapel, but also includes the 
Newman Residence Hall for men and the 
Newman House for women. While Newman 
Hall and House are affiliated with the Catholic 
faith, residents are not restricted on this 
basis. Lisa Oslovich, sophomore in LAS and 
resident of Newman House, described the 
House in this way: "It's small and you can get 
to know people more. Since I'm Catholic, it's a 
nice place to be in with people similar to me." 

Geared towards providing a supportive 
environment for students to increase their 
spiritual growth, the Foundation focuses on 
providing the opportunity for students and 
fellow parishioners to explore their faith. 
Rev. Joseph Hogan, pastoral head and 
coordinator of several of the Foundation's 
events, said, "At this point in people's lives, 
they're asking a lot of questions. Our purpose 
is to provide ways to answer these questions. " 

The main program Hogan coordinates is a 
series of four retreats, two each semester, 



Story by Sonali Das ®- 7 Layout by Colleen Christensen 

known as "Koinonia". These retreats are 
open to all denominations and feature group 
discussions and prayer. Activities are 
coordinated with prayer to allow students to 
discuss their faith with others in a more 
intimate setting. Anne Marie Magna, senior 
in LAS who attended several of the retreats, 




"The Foundation has 

really given me a 

foundation for my 

continued faith after 

college. It has really 

prepared me for some 

of those conflicts and 

issues I may face. y 

— Anne Marie Magna 




explained how this activity brought about a 
strengthening in spirit and mind. She felt the 
experience was "a great way to meet friends 
and help each other in the process." 

Small weekly discussion groups are also 
sponsored by the Newman Foundation. 
Ranging in subjects from Bible Study to 



special support groups for international 
students to guidance for married couples, 
these groups allow participants to explore 
many facets of their spirituality. 

Offering many opportunities to be involved 
in social action, the Foundation also works 
with local campus groups like Habitat fori 
Humanity and the Appalachian Projects whichi 
build or rehabilitate homes for the poor.i 
Other local volunteer projects include] 
Catholic Worker House, a shelter for battered 
women. Hogan stated, "These activities 
provide students the opportunity to come in 
contact with students alive with their faith. ; 
St. John's is a phenomenal place and through 
its involvement it reveals its spirit." 

In the area of academics, the Foundation 
offers credit courses through the U of I each 
semester. Taught by Rev. Robert Barry, an' 
adjunct associate professor in religious 
studies, the courses cover a wide variety of 
subjects dealing with Christian history and 
modern faith. Hogan pointed out that the 
classes give students a basis for the Christian 
faith and its practice. 

With its wide variety of opportunities for 
students, the Foundation works to strengthen 
members and address current concerns in 
Christian faith for future growth. "Now is the 
time where people move into a more mature 
faith, developing the personal relationship 
with God," Hogan explained. 

Magna agreed, saying: "The Foundation 
has really given me a foundation for my 
continued faith after college. It has really 
prepared me for some of those conflicts and 
issues I may face." 



124 





— Tim Hutchinson 

Dave Wozniak, a sophomore in 
Engineering, gets some studying done 
in the library of Newman Hall. The 
Foundation offers credit courses through 
U of I each semester. 

Agroup of students workon constructing 
their GE 199 project. At the Newman 
House, men and women increase their 
knowledge and faith. 



Newman Foundation 125 



Grade "A" Groups 
Gain Glory 



Do you tremble at the thought of public 
speaking? Do you enjoy missing classes (for 
a legitimate reason) and traveling to far off 
exotic places? More importantly, do you lie 
awake at night wondering if old Mrs. O'Leary's 
cow was really prime rib or just ground beef? 
Do you ask yourself if Mr. Ed would have 
been able to hoof it in the real world? If you 
answered yes to any of these questions, then 
one of the University's collegiate judging 
teams may be just the thing for you. 

The U of I currently has three judging 
teams that judge meats, livestock and horses. 
These teams compete actively in contests 
around the country. At the contests, all 
procedures are basically the same for all 
teams. Each team, made up of four to five 
people with one alternate, is required to 
judge approximately twelve classes. Classes 
are made up of four animals or carcasses. 
The teams are then awarded points for how 
closely their placings agree with the judges. 
Awards are given to the top scoring teams. 

The participants on the team learn to 
objectively evaluate and rank their respective 
subjects. The livestock team spends its days 
learning the finer points of cattle, sheep and 
hogs. By examining the conformation, or 
how well-structured the animal is, team 
members must discern the best animals for 
breeding purposes as well as those bound to 
be market stock. Similarly, the meat team 
judges the same species of animals, although 
not quite in the same form. They must be able 
to select the best from beef, pork and lamb 



Story by Kris Hiney - Layout by Trish Kretzer 

carcasses, as well as hams and other cuts of 
meat. The horse judging team, on the other 
hand, appraises the conformation of horses in 
halter classes (where the animal is only led by 
the handler), and in performance classes. These 
performance classes include Western and 




"U of Is livestock 

team is known as the 

team to beat. y 

— Wendy Peterson 




English pleasure, Western riding, reining and 
trail. In these classes, the horses are required 
to perform specific maneuvers and are critiqued 
on how well they execute them. 

Once the team members have placed the 
classes in order from best to worst, they must 
be able to defend their decisions by giving 
sets of reasons. Reasons are two-minute oral 
presentations, or in the case of the meat 
team, written reasons, given to a presiding 
official at the contest that explain why the 
individual placed the class in that order. 

As Steven Cooper, graduate student in 
Agriculture and coach of the horse judging 
team, explains, "The judging team may be 



better than public speaking classes because 
the students learn to evaluate, make critical 
decisions and defend themselves." 

Wendy Peterson, senior in Agriculture, 
joined the livestock team, in part, because of 
the chance to develop excellent 
communication skills through giving oral' 
reasons. In addition, Peterson joined the 
livestock team because of the prestige 
involved. "U of I's livestock team is known 
as the team to beat," said Peterson. All three 
judging teams get the chance to test their 1 
skills against other college teams in variousi 
contests across the United States, traveling, 
as far as Pennsylvania for the livestock and 
meats team and Oklahoma for the horse- 
judging team. 

Becca Ross, junior in Agriculture and a 
member of the meat judging team, finds 
participating to be slightly exhilarating. It's not' 
only the keen competition, but also the fact that 
all classes are held in the meat cooler. 

Lori Hoffman, sophomore in LAS and 
member of the horse judging team, and Ross 
agree that being on the team is time 
consuming but fun. "Sometimes to relieve 
tension we skip down the [meat locker] 
aisles singing show tunes," said Ross. 

Joining the judging teams may not be for 
everyone, but it can be a worthwhile experience. 
Besides the contests and the fun with team 
members, Hoffman enjoys participating on the 
team because "judging has taught me how to 
be a better balanced individual who more 
readily divides into thirds." 



126 Academics 




-Dave Wolkowitz 




Trish LaCasha and Shanna Zimmerman, both juniors in 
Agriculture, step up for a closer look at the weanling filly handled 
by Kris Hiney, senior in Agriculture. The horse judging team 
members are taking notes on the filly's conformation, looking at 
structure, balance and muscling. 

Beef cattle from the South Farms in Champaign observe from the 
other side of the fence. The livestock judging team evaluates beef 
cattle as well as swine and sheep. 



^^^•' • -•-•«fe<2*&» 



Judging Teams 127 



Second year TA, Nancy Garrett passes back exams in her Sociology 
222 class. TAs are not only respnsible for grading exams, but also 
for grading homework assignments, keeping office hours, and 
their own classes. 




Carlos Miranda 

Sameer Kaul lectures to his Introduction to Marketing (BA 
202) students. His first semester he taught Computer 
Science 105, but this semester he is teaching Business 
Administration 202. 

Nancy Garrett discusses the previous lecture with her students. 
Sociology 222 is titled Introduction to Africa. 




128 Academics 



Just a Little Respect 

Story by Emma Brennan ®~ ^Layout by Anna Nommensen 



Due to the large size of our university, it 
inevitable that students will have to deal with 
ne at some point in time in their college 
ireer, and it is more likely than not that they 
ill come in contact with them quite often. For 
iany students on this campus, their experiences 
ive led them to have a love-hate relationship 
1th these people. Yes, I am referring to those 
eloved Teaching Assistants (TAs) that we 
ive all come to know and. . . well. . . know, 
he sentiments of many undergrads 
)ncerning their TAs are wrapped up by 
elly Rahmanian, sophomore in LAS. "Some 
\s are good and some are bad. Some are 
/en better than the professors." 

Although they probably encounter them 
most every day, most students have probably 
ever sat down and thought about what it 
ould be like to be a TA. Many people just 
isume that their TAs just sit in the classroom 
1 day and have no lives of their own. TAs are 
ghly aware of this view of them held by their 
u dents. It is very discouraging for TAs when 
.eir students show them disrespect and treat 
em as enemies. Kun-Soo Kim, a TA in 
icrobiology, wants students to know that TAs 
e "trying hard to give their experience and 
lowledge to their students. When a student 
, however, just hanging around and wants to 
it a good grade without trying hard and just 
)mplains, the TA gets very discouraged and 
ould not try hard anymore." 



The life of a TA involves much more than 
just teaching a few classes. In addition to this, 
TAs are expected to do research for their own 
graduate requirements, prepare for their lectures, 
hold office hours and answer the questions and 




The TA spends one 

hour listening 

to the lecture and 

in the next hour 

finds himself 

or herself 
delivering one. ; 

— Sriketan Mahanti 




comments of their students, grade papers and 
tests, and also write recommendations for 
some of their students. TAs have the difficult 
job of being both teachers and students. This 
experience, however, gives them an interesting 



perspective on the knowledge that they must 
convey to their students. 

"The TA spends one hour listening to 
lectures and in the next hour finds himself or 
herself delivering one," said Sriketan Mahanti, 
a TA for Geology 100. "This way, in a class, a 
TA student is in a better position to appreciate 
the teacher's psyche and so may be more 
collaborative or keen on listening to the lectures. 
In a way, you become more critical in 
appreciating the teaching and also you become 
more responsible as a student." 

With all of these responsibilities, it seems 
hard to believe that TAs would have much of 
an opportunity to have a social life. Some TAs 
commented that it is hard for them to find the 
time and energy to go out on the weekends. 
Erica Bown, junior in CBA, has evidence, 
however, that TAs do like to go out and have 
fun. Bown recalled "After the first exam, all of 
the CBA TAs rented out the beer garden of 
Gully's for their students. All of the TAs were 
sitting around a table drinking and smoking. It 
was totally unexpected!" 

Although the job of a TA is very demanding, 
most find their experiences rewarding. Mahanti, 
for example, said, "Oh sure, I find my work 
extremely rewarding. I enjoy it thoroughly, 
especially when I get good participation from the 
students." Most TAs want students to know that 
they are people too, and they have pressures and 
deadlines just like undergrads. 



Teaching Assistants 129 



Behind the Scenes 



Story by Emma Brennan 



Layout by Anna Nommensen 



Although most students never even think 
about them when they go to see a play or an 
opera at the Krannert Center for the Performing 
Arts, the props that were used for each production : 
were carefully thought out and produced. 

"A bare room is the set for a production. Props 
are everything that goes into an area to tell a 
story, including carpeting, lights, furniture and 
even the things the actors cany in their pockets. 
Props help to tell the story, establishing the time 
period, the social status of the actors and also 
their attitudes," said Jim Guy, head of the Properties 
Shop, better known as the "Prop Shop." 

The Prop Shop at the U of I is one of three 
professional theatrical training programs in the 
countiy for graduate students earning a degree in 
props and design management. Several graduate 
assistants , who are working towards their Masters 
of Fine Arts, have assistantships in the Prop Shop 
during the year. A prop master is selected to 
work for each show, and he or she is responsible 
for working with the designer and the director to 
ensure that the props for a show are suitable. 

Alison Sideris, a third year graduate student 
who is working towards a master's for props 
and design management, decided to pursue 
this as her major instead of scene design 
"because I realized that I like the nit-picky 
details that are involved with props. I really 
enjoy dressing the rooms." 

For each of the sixteen shows that are held 
at Krannert each year, the props are selected 
and constructed by U of I students. Props for 
the shows are either built, bought or borrowed. 
Props for a production need to be built securely 



because they go through a lot of wear and tear 
in the rehearsals and shows. In some 
productions, for example, actors are required 
to stand on tables or knock over chairs, and, 
after several weeks of practice, some props start 
to fall apart. Therefore, rehearsal props are 
sometimes required, especially if the real prop is 




'The object of the 

game is to make 

things as specific 

and life-like 

as possible." 

— Jim Guy 




something valuable or fragile. 

Because selecting props is a complicated 
process, the staff often has to start looking for 
certain props months in advance of a 
performance. The props for each show need to 
be pertinent to the characters in the show and 
suitable to the time period, so it sometimes 
requires the staff to drive hundreds of miles to 
find a particular item. Some of the more peculiar 



items that the Prop Shop was required to fine 
include radio equipment from the 1960s, a 
cookie jar from the 1930s and rifles from 1903 

"The object of the game is to make things a5 
specific and life-like as possible so as not tc 
distract the audience from the production with 
something that looks out of place. We work hare 
to produce what the designer had envisioned foi 
the stage. We also have to make the actors fee' 
as comfortable as possible with their props ir 
order to ensure a smooth show," said Guy. 

Because the props have to be specific tc 
certain time periods, the staff at the Prop Shop i; 
often required to spend many hours at the librar) 
conducting research. In addition to reading 
about different times, the staff also examine; 
movies that deal with similar time periods to get 
a better idea of how the props should look. 

Once a show is completed, items are eithei] 
returned, sold or put into one of the nintl 
storage areas on campus for use in future 
productions. In these storage facilities, items o 
a similar nature are grouped together, such as 
chandeliers, luggage and smoking pipes. These 
items are held in storage until they are needec 
for a production. Sometimes these items are 
reconstructed for new productions. 

Students who work in the Prop Shop gair 
valuable experience that prepares them for future 
work in the theater as well as practical knowledge 
that can be used in everyday life. "I have 
acquired so many new skills, such as building 
furniture, upholstery, costume making and patten 
drafting as a result of working in the Prop Shop 
It is truly amazing," said Sideris. 



130 Academics 





Julie Hannaford, assistant managet of the Ktannet t Centet fot the 
Petforming Arts Prop Shop, helps prepare for a show. Props for 
the shows are either built, bought or borrowed. 

Alison Sideris, a graduate student, works on a chair in the 
Krannert Center for the Performing Arts Prop Shop. Sideris is 
working towards a master's degree for props and design 
management. 



Krannert Props 131 




—Peggy Gibbons 



David Jimenez, sophomore in Aviation, and Joe Schroeder, 
junior in Aviation, study a PT-6 turbopropellor for their 
Powerplant Systems class. They are working toward a powerplant 
certification which most students qualify for at the end of their 
second year of maintenance. 

Jessica Reinschmidt, junior in Aviation, and Bryan Lange, 
sophomore in Aviation, put the finishing touches on fiberglass 
parts used in wing repair during one of the many labs required 
for aviation maintenance students. The U of I Institute of 
Aviation is currently undergoing extensive changes within the 
University. 



132 Academics 




A Change 
in Flight Plan 

Story by Robert Avila and Carol Frantilla " Layout by Anna Nommensen 



The U of I Institute of Aviation is currently 
undergoing what is probably one of the more 
extensive changes within the University. After 
having been a University-sponsored college for 
nearly 50 years, offering Federal Aviation 
Administration approved programs in both aircraft 
maintenance and flight training, state budget cuts 
have led to significant downsizing of the Institute, 
with the aircraft maintenance area within the 
Institute already being phased out. 

The three main components of the Institute 
are flight training, aircraft maintenance and 
aviation research. Flight training at the Institute 
began in 1946, just after Champaign opened 
the U of I Willard Airport. Presently, the Institute 
operates a fleet of over 30 aircraft, several flight 
simulators and many other sources of training 
for student use. Upon completion of the flight 
training program, students receive a commercial 
pilot's license with an instrument rating, with 
the option of continuing for flight instructor 
certificates. In the Aircraft Maintenance program, 
students learn the technical side of aviation, 
gaining an understanding of the internal 
workings of all types of aircraft, through lectures 
and "hands on" training in lab settings. This 
program leads to certification of the student as 
an airframe and power plant mechanic. The 
Aviation Research Laboratory conducts research 
using student pilots, although most aviation 
students are not involved in this research. 

Recently, the U of I has been making 
significant budget reductions, and because the 
Institute only offers non-degree certificate 
programs, it has become the focus of many of 
these cuts. A task group on aviation has already 
recommended a 28% reduction in Institute 
funding to be reallocated to other University 
degree programs. As a result of these budget 
cuts, some sections of aviation classes were cut, 
and aviation classrooms were packed. "Right 



now, some aviation faculty are experiencing an 
overload, some have schedules that include 35 
student contact hours per week - much more 
than other faculty members in other parts of the 
University," said Jeff Winter, senior in Aviation. 
Complete elimination does not seem 
imminent for the Institute, however. A 
consortium of 11 community colleges from 




'Were losing more 
and more state 
funding each year, 

but this 

arrangement with 

the colleges in the 

consortium will 

allow us to grow in 

other directions. ' 

— Terry Ladage 




central Illinois expressed an interest in sending 
their students to the U of I to take advantage of 
the U of I's maintenance program. Because of 
this interest, the Institute of Aviation has made 
an agreement with the consortium which will 
result in the transfer of the Institute's 
maintenance program to the consortium, and 



out of the University. 

This agreement with the consortium has 
evoked mixed feelings from the University 
community and the general public. Many 
students who are not in the aircraft maintenance 
program in the Institute of Aviation do not 
greatly feel the changes that the particular 
program is undergoing. "I'm in the professional 
pilot program, so I don't feel the effects of the 
changes in the maintenance area. Nevertheless, 
I am disappointed in the way that the University 
seems to prioritize, cutting funds from non- 
degree programs like the aviation program 
despite the fact that the U of I is one of the top- 
ranked aviation schools in the nation," said Ed 
Obuchowski, junior in Aviation. 

Other present aviation students fought bitterly 
against the proposed changes in the aircraft 
maintenance program at first, but now see it as 
a positive step. "At first, I didn't think an 
arrangement with community colleges would 
work; there are many differences between 
being a community college student and being 
a University student. However, I think that this 
consortium college arrangement saved the 
program. The program has a good reputation, 
and I wouldn't want to see it go," said Winter. 

Some instructors also had positive feelings 
toward the changes. "Although we're 
experiencing a lower enrollment now because 
some parents and prospective students were 
leery of the proposed budget cuts and changes 
in the aviation program, I expect enrollment to 
go up in the future when we start receiving 
students from the consortium colleges," said 
Terry Ladage, professional aviation education 
specialist in the Institute of Aviation. "We're 
losing more and more state funding each year, 
but this arrangement with the colleges in the 
consortium will allow us to grow in other 
directions," Ladage added. 



Aviation 133 



Doing It With Style 



Story by Cheri Roller ' Layout by Suk Ju Yun 



Did you ever sit in a class thinking that 
you could teach better than the professor? 
You would not be saying that if you ever had 
Dr. David Zola, professor in educational 
psychology. Zola has a unique teaching style 
that includes everyone in his lectures. Zola 
would love to get to know all of his students 
personally. He takes the time to write a 
personal welcome letter to everyone in the 
lecture at the beginning of the semester. 
Even though it is a form letter, the effort is 
still there. Besides the letter, he calls different 
students up on Saturday afternoons to see 
how class is going, to see what he can do to 
change the lecture format and just to see 
how the students are doing in general. 

Zola was raised in the small town of 
Lennex, Mass. After he had completed high 
school, he attended Fairfield University in 
Connecticut, where he completed a 
bachelor's degree in English and a master's 
in corporate and political communications. 
After receiving his master's, he was still 
unsure of what he wanted to do, so he 
continued in his education. From Fairfield, 
he went to Williams College in Massachusetts 
to study psychology. He holds a doctorate 
in educational psychology from Cornell 
University in New York. 



The University of Illinois is the location of 
the largest reading center in the nation. 
Here, research is done on illiteracy and 
people are trained to help fight illiteracy. 




"Professor Zola 
has no problem 

keeping my 

attention for the 

entire hour and a 

half He makes the 

course interesting. " 

-Mike Meade 




Because Zola has a great deal of interest in 
this area, he came to the University of Illinois 
in 1978. 

When Zola arrived at U of I, he taught 



only sporadically until 1986, when he took 
over Educational Psychology 211. He wanted 
to make some changes in this class. One of 
the changes he implemented was to teach 
one of the discussion groups in addition to 
lecturing. This is normally not done. 

This is a very unique class," said Josh 
Radetski, sophomore in LAS. This is a 
common view held by students because 
Zola has an innovative approach to teaching 
the students. For each topic, Zola has a 
unique style of presenting the material. He 
uses techniques such as dressing up like 
Piaget, a French researcher in cognitive 
development, or bringing in a video tape of 
"The Simpsons" along with bags of popcorn. , 
Besides having Piaget visit the classroom, ; 
Zola will dress up like Mr. Rogers of children's \ 
television fame, and have him "visit the ; 
neighborhood." 

"This course is not textbook driven," Zola 
said. The focus of the course is instead to get 
the students to think critically about 
education. 

When asked about his feelings toward 
Zola, Mike Meade, sophomore in LAS, replied, 
"Professor Zola has no problem keeping my 
attention for the entire hour and a half. He 
makes the course interesting." 

John Pellikan, sophomore in Education, talks with Professor Zola 
during his Psychology 2 1 1 class. Many students like the fact that 
Professor Zola uses a variety of different teaching techniques. 



134 Academics 





Professor Zola lectures to his Psychology 211 class. He uses 
a unique teaching style that tries to include everyone in 
his lectures. 

Professor Zola hands out papers at the beginning of his 
Psychology 211 class. The focus of the course is to get 
students to think critically about education. 



-M.itt Grotto 



Professor Zola 135 




Scott Rhodes, junior in LAS, Mike Miller, sophomore in LAS, 
James Westbrook, sophomore in Agriculture, and Kristina 
Mann, senior in LAS, play cards in the commons of Allen Hall 
located outside of the cafeteria. They said that the commons 
usually packs with people after 1 1 :30 p.m. 

Andrew Kwon, sophomore in Engineering, accompanies a 
literature reading with his guitar while Bill Carroll, artistic 
associate with MPAACT, dances along. MPAACT was one of 
the groups that participated in the Guest-in-Residence program 
hosted by Allen Hall. 




136 Academics 



Not All Are 
"Residence Halls" 



Though all of the buildings on campus 
that fall under the category of non-private 
university housing are generically labeled 
"residence halls," there are few that actually 
live up to the title. Students call these 
communal homes "dorms" - a much more 
appropriate term in most cases. A dorm is a 
place where students eat, sleep and perform 
various other basic functions. These places 
have little to do with the expansion of the 
mind and the search for knowledge which is 
the goal of most people who spend their 
money - or their parents' money - to come to 
this university. In a residence hall, students 
should be able to learn and have 
opportunities to broaden their horizons. Allen 
Hall, in conjunction with the Unit One 
program, offers students these opportunities, 
and can truly be called a residence hall. 

The Unit One program, which makes 
classes and tutors available to the students 
within the hall, was first introduced in Allen 
Hall in 1972, and consisted of 100 residents 
living on one floor. The next year, the 
program expanded to 200 students, and after 
:hat it spread to the whole building. 

Originally, all of the courses were 
independent study, but now there are 
classrooms on the ground floor in Allen 
where students can attend regular classes, 
with regular university faculty, for regular 
university credit without leaving the building. 

According to the Unit One director, 



Story by Erin Woolley ^ Layout by Claudia 

Howard Schein, although the subject matter 
in Unit One classes is the same as that of the 
classes on the Quad, there is a greater level 
of student involvement in discussions. Most 
of the Unit One classes are small and personal, 
and students tend to be less intimidated 




"It makes it easier 

on freshmen 

because it's a 

better transition 

from high school 

to college. yJ 

— Aarti Kotac 




about speaking out in class. 

"It makes it easier on freshmen because 
it's a better transition from high school to 
college - it takes out the intimidation factor 
and allows students to interact with people 
not only in class, but out of class also 



Rodriguez 

because they live together," said Aartie Kotak, 
sophomore in LAS and resident of Allen Hall. 

Another special program, the Guest-in- 
Residence program, is one of the 
extracurricular activities offered through Unit 
One that makes Allen Hall unique. This 
program consists of a series of visiting guests 
who have a diverse range of professions and 
interests. The visitors live in Allen for one to 
three weeks running programs, workshops 
and informal discussions with students. 

Contrary to popular belief, the people that 
live in Allen are basically the same as students 
that live in the other dorms on campus. The 
percentage of Allen residents who smoke, dye 
their hair and hold radical political beliefs is 
roughly the same as the percentage at any of 
the other university residence halls. The 
percentage of students who succeed 
academically is also roughly the same. Where 
Allenites differ is in their level of involvement. 

"The people that come to live in Allen 
look like normal freshmen in terms of what 
the University measures, but I think that if 
you measured other things, like motivational 
factors, they look different," Schein said. 

Schein went on to explain that Allen residents 
not only got good grades in high school, but 
were probably also, for example, class president. 

Ron Kochendoerfer, the Resident Director 
for Allen agreed with Schein. He explained that 
at Allen, residents create their own environment. 
"The students provide programs for themselves. " 



Allen Hall 137 



A Merit to the 
U of I Math Classes 

Story by Urbano Chaidez - ^Layout by Anna Nommensen 



Upon coming to the U of I, many students 
encounter difficulties coping with the large classes 
and acquainting themselves with life here at the 
University. Many students are intimidated by the 
huge lectures and classes in courses like 
anthropology, economics and chemistry. In 
order to counteract this intimidation, the University 
offers a variety of programs that help students 
with troublesome courses like math and chemistry. 
In addition to walk-in tutoring services offered 
by these departments, a different approach has 
been taken to help the students. For nearly six 
years, the U of I has been offering the Merit 
Workshop in mathematics and chemistry. 

The Merit Workshop is a special discussion 
section designed for students that are from 
under-represented cultural and ethnic groups on 
campus. The material covered in the special 
section is no different from the information 
covered in the regular discussion sections. In 
fact, students in the workshop attend the same 
lectures, take the same exams and receive the 
same course instruction. The difference between 
Merit Workshop discussion sections and the 
regular sections is that the students work in 
groups and attend classes for one to two extra 
hours each week. 

According to Paul McCreary, teaching 
associate in the math department and the director 
of the Merit Workshop, "Academic peer groups 
are an immense benefit" to the students because 
they learn the information in groups, and students 
"feel that they have learned more." These 
distinctions prove helpful for the students. 
McCreary said the Merit Workshop students 
perform, on the average, a letter grade better 
than the class as a whole and a grade to a grade 



and a half better than their peers in the same 
ethnic or cultural group. 

The aim of these "academic peer groups" is 
to help the students cope with huge classes in an 
interpersonal manner, instead of individually. 




"Sometimes I feel 

that I drag the rest 

of the group, but 

when they help 

me, I learn the 

material better. 

— Estella Hernandez 




These classes are designed for students to teach 
themselves and each other with the guiding 
assistance of the TAs. The TAs help the students 
when needed, but the information is usually 
found by asking other students, which is the 
objective of the program. 

"If you can teach someone the information, 
then you feel like you understand and have 
mastered the information," said Latasha Napper, 
a sophomore in LAS. 

Scott Brakenridge, sophomore in LAS, felt 
that he "learned a lot more than in the regular 



math classes because the information wa? 
presented in a different manner." 

However, not all students feel the same 
way. In Bio-Calculus, a Math 120 sectio 



* 



designed for life science majors and taught 
with the Mathematica program, Laura Carlson, 
a biology major in LAS, said, "I found it easy - 
the information was not exceptionally hard. 
There was too much computer work, and nol 
enough math!" 

Other students who enjoyed the class had 
similar feelings toward the format of the classes^ 
"Initially, I wanted answers from the TAs! I 
found that frustrating, but that forced me tc 
figure out my thought process and everyone 
else's. It made the learning interesting," said 
Napper. 

Another problem students found was thai 
not all students in their groups learn at the 
same pace. "Sometimes I feel that I drag the 
rest of the group, but when they help me, I 
learn the material better. I got the highest 
grade in my group on the first exam," saici 
Estella Hernandez, sophomore in LAS. 

Brakenridge agreed that it "adds all the more 
for people who learn at a slower pace, going 
over it with them helps you and your group 
understand the concepts better." 

Students found that the extra time invested in 
these courses was worthwhile and that the Merit 
sections helped them reduce their studying time. 
The Merit section has helped the students organize 
their time and deal with the social stress found in 
large, competitive classes. 

"I recommend the class to people who want 
an alternative [method of] instruction," said 
Brakenridge. 



138 Academics 



;eph Robertson, Frederica Holloway and Francis Nguyen discuss 
lath problem during a Merit Workshop class. Merit Workshop 
sses have been offered in math and chemistry for almost six 
irs now. 




— Carles Miranda 

Teaching assistant Brad Kline explains the solution to April 
Johnson in a Mathematics 242 Merit Workshop class. Students 
in Merit Workshop classes attend discussion sections one or two 
extra hours a week. 



— Carlos Miranda 



chael Ferguson discusses a math problem with another member 
his group during a Mathematics 242 Merit Workshop class, 
ese classes help students learn from their peers. 



Merit Workshop 139 




Brock Baer, freshman in LAS, John Kapp and Joe Elarde, seniors 
in Engineering, wait for their turn to bowl as they keep the score 
of a game. Patrick Owens, junior in CBA, prepares to bowl during 
the Kinesiology 100 class. 

Tony Messana, senior in CBA, practices a swimming routine in 
Kinesiology 1 06, Swimming II. Popular kinesiology classes include 
aerobics, tennis, yoga and just about any sport that a student 
might have interest in. 



140 Academics 



It's Not 
Gym Class Anymore 

Story by Emma Brennan s Ty Layout by Anna Nommensen 



When most people think about 
lesiology, they immediately think of classes 
it involve physical activity. There are, 
wever, a wide variety of kinesiology classes 
ered at the U of I which focus on subjects 
:h as injuries in sports, bioscientific 
indations of human movement and social 
entific bases of sport. Many students do 
:e Kinesiology 100 or 101 classes to fill up 
hour's slot on their schedule or to meet 
ople, but classes in the kinesiology 
partment that are held for kinesiology 
jors explore topics that are much more 
ious than tennis or bowling. 
The majority of the classes in the 
lesiology department are aimed towards 
lesiology majors. The goal of this 
partment is to allow its students the 
portunity to learn about human movement 
all of its dimensions. Undergraduate study 
:uses on social and cultural aspects 
mcerned with physical activity, exercise 
ess, therapeutic techniques of kinesiology 
d the development of the body. Classes 
Bering these topics combine a liberal arts 
d sciences education with an in-depth 
dy in a student's area of interest. 
"Kinesiology classes incorporate a lot of 
:as that most people would not assume are 
'olved in kinesiology, such as physics, 
ministry and biology. I am pre-med, and I feel 
t the courses I take in kinesiology help me 
learn a lot of things that I can apply to my 
;ryday life as well as to my future in medicine," 
d Melinda Kelly, sophomore in ALS. 
Classes in the kinesiology department are 
: up in much the same manner as classes 
other departments, with large lectures 
ight by professors and labs and discussion 
:tions taught by teaching assistants. The 



department of kinesiology is keeping up 
with the changing times by using modern 
video and laboratory equipment that allows 
students to measure the biological and 
mechanical parameters of man in motion. 

Students and faculty are encouraged to 
work on research projects together so that 
students have an opportunity to get a more in- 




"I am pre-med, and I 
feel that the courses I 

take in kinesiology 
help me to learn a lot 

of things that I can 
apply to my everyday 

life as well as to my 
future in medicine. y 

— Melinda Kelly 




depth look into their particular area of interest. 
Some kinesiology classes allow students to 
conduct research in a work setting, such as in 
a high school physical education department, 
in a health club or in a sports information 
center. Students who desire to earn a teaching 
or athletic certification can satisfy the necessary 
requirements by selecting specific courses in 



the curriculum that fit into their area of focus. 
Once a student has sixty hours of credit, he or 
she has the opportunity to become a student 
teacher through a special program offered at 
the U of I. Coaching endorsements can also be 
earned by students desiring to attain positions 
as coaches in their future careers. 

"Although I am not a kinesiology major, I 
took a class in that department because I 
wanted to learn more about the functions of my 
body. I learned a lot through the labs I took, 
such as strength, body composition and 
endurance. In addition, it helped me to plan an 
exercise program that would be most beneficial 
to me," said Kim Abruzino, freshman in LAS. 

Besides classes that are offered specifically 
for kinesiology majors, there are many 
kinesiology classes that are popular with 
students from all majors on campus. These 
classes include aerobics, tennis, yoga and 
just about any sport that a student would be 
interested in participating. 

"I took horseback riding because I live in the 
city, and this class provided me with my only 
opportunity to ride and learn about the grooming 
and care of a horse. I found it a relaxing escape 
from the monotony of my regular academic 
classes," said Amy Moore, senior in LAS. 

In addition to providing students with an 
opportunity for physical activity or relaxation, 
classes offered through the kinesiology 
department also teach students about 
nutrition, health and functions of the body. 

"I originally took aerobics because I needed 
an extra hour in my schedule, but it ended up 
being a good experience for me because it 
forced me to work out and also because I 
learned a lot of valuable information about my 
body," said Lori Bruce, senior in 
Communications. 



Kinesiology Classes 141 



Bringing Conversation 
Down to a Science 



Story by Urbano Chaidez Layout by Suk Ju Yun 



Being a large university, the U of I is 
school and home for over 30,000 students 
- a society within itself. Here, students find 
it necessary to communicate with one 
another, something that many people take 
for granted. As these students communicate, 
many of them have given no thought to what 
it is like to have a speech, language or 
hearing disorder. 

In order to let students understand what 
many take for granted, the U of I offers 
Speech and Hearing Science 102, an 
introductory course in the speech and hearing 
sciences. Although this course will not be a 
requirement for speech and hearing science 
majors starting in the Spring of 1995, students 
still have the opportunity to take the course 
as an elective. Joan G. Erickson, associate 
professor in speech and hearing science, 
teaches this course which many students 
find helpful and practical in their daily lives. 
Some students may find that taking this 
course is more helpful in their daily lives 
than an astronomy or geology course which 
would fulfill the same requirement. This 
class helps students understand and 
communicate with those with speech, 
language and hearing disorders, something 
an astronomy or geology course cannot do. 

The course teaches the students "the basic 
idea about disorders," said Maria Sanchez, a 



junior in Social Work. Students also attend 
lectures given by guest speakers, watch films 
and are encouraged to take advantage of the 
free speech clinic that the University has for all 
students. The purpose of the guest speaker and 




a 



The course offers an 
insight on how 
hard it is to fit 
into a society 
when someone 
cannot speak. " 

— Adela Carlin 




the films is to stress the importance of individual 
topics. The class brings insight into situations 
from a student's everyday life, teaching students 
about subjects like bilingualism, disabled people 
and their families and different dialects of a 



language. Some students are simply intriguec 
by the idea of language. Matt Van Ryn, junioi 
in LAS, says that the course is "very interesting,' 
and helps him "learn to integrate disorders' 
with his major, linguistics. 

Adela Carlin, sophomore in LAS, said thai 
Erickson goes beyond the basic information 
"The course offers an insight on how hard it i< 
to fit into a society when someone canno 1 
speak," and "it tells how society tends td 
alienate people with disorders and how society 
does not allow them the opportunity to interact' 
with people. 

Along with readings, lectures and tests 
Erickson requires students to make use of some 
of the facilities in the speech and hearing clinic 
Students in the course have an opportunity tc; 
have a free audiology (hearing) test or have c 
speech test for a minimal cost. "The test cost: 
fifteen dollars an hour and is three hours long,' 
said Van Ryn. 

Erickson also requires students to eithei 
observe clinical therapy (in speech, language 
and hearing) or participate in a learning 
experience. In a learning experience, student: 
try to experience a handicap. Sanchez did i 
learning experience by blocking sound ou 
for a 24 hour period. "It drove me crazy b) 
the end," said Sanchez, "but now I have ar 
idea about how people with hearing 
disorders feel." 



142 Academics 





— Matt Grotto 
Sheri McGee, graduate clinician, and Marcie Melecosky, 
senior participant student in ALS, help L.C. Jackson, an 
Urbana resident, with English vocabulary and phrase skills. 
Jackson suffered a stroke and needs rehabilitation to speak properly. 

Smret Gebrehiwet, fteshman in LAS, and Tamekia Hill, 
freshman in ALS, react to pictures of a cleft lip palate in their 
Speech and Hearing Science 102 class. The U of I offers 
Speech and Hearing Science 102, an introductory course in 
the speech and hearing sciences. 



Speech and Hearing Science 143 



A New Life 
for a Semester 

Story by Gabrielle Ann Caputo @ -^~~ 5> Layout by Sukju Yun 



Imagine walking on the Quad one day, and 
passing a fellow student who greets you with 
the phrase "All right?" You may think to yourself, 
"I'm fine, but I don't know about him." Now let 
us pretend that your professor wants to introduce 
you to a student. You extend your hand to be 
polite, but the student attempts to kiss you on 
the cheek. Your first reaction is to immediately 
back away. Well, if you were an exchange 
student or international student, the phrase 
"What's up?" may lead you to actually look up, 
and a simple handshake may lead you to 
believe that the person you are meeting is rude. 
These are just a few examples that exchange 
and international students encounter when 
they arrive at the U of I. Once these differences 
have been accepted, they then must learn to 
adapt academically and culturally to the 
University for the time that they are here. 

There are 3,064 international students 
that attended the University in the Fall of 
1994. International students are not the same 
as exchange students, however. Exchange 
students come to the University to simply 
study abroad for a semester or two, and 
international students come to the University 
to earn their degree. The majority of these 
students transfer from universities in China, 
Taiwan and Korea. To attend school here, 
these students must first verify their visa 
status and their financial status. They also must 
have finished the 12th grade, received a score 
of 550 or above on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) which is 
comparable to a verbal score of 500-540 on a 
SAT test, have a strong B average and really be 



the elite of their class due to a denial rate of 
50% for applicants. 

Many students come to the University of 
Illinois because there are not many schools in the 
United States that offer the opportunity for 
international study. Coming to this university 
gives the international and exchange students an 
advantage over the students in their home 




"The people in South 
America have much 

closer physical 

relavionships. We greet 

people with kisses and 

hugs, unlike here. r 

— Daniela Diamant 




countries. From their experience here, they have 
the advantage of acquiring a job faster and their 
communication skills are improved. Some of the 
popular majors studied are: American studies, 
business administration, international business, 
international marketing and engineering. 

There is a difference, though. Academically, 
the type of work and performance expected 



from the student is not the same. For example, 
Sarah Jenkins, junior from the University ofj 
Nottingham in the United Kingdom, said, "The] 
work here is different from England. The work 
in England is harder, but the amount of work 
is less than the amount given here. The work 
here is more time consuming, but not hard." 

Academics is only a minor part of the 
adaptation. Culturally, international and 
exchange students are faced with unfamiliar 
terms, customs and overall social change. There 
are many differences between American culture 
and that of other countries. One of the major 
differences noticed is the lack of human contact.' 
At the U of I, everyone wants his or her own 
space, so as not to feel threatened. 

Daniela Diamant, senior from the University 
Sao Paulo in Brazil whose major is business 
administration, said "The people in South 
America have much closer physical 
relationships. We greet people with kisses and 
hugs, unlike here." 

Another common difference these students 
encounter is time and communication. Oscai 
Ruiz, graduate student from Los Andes 
University, whose major is mechanical 
engineering, said, "In Colombia you call or gd 
see someone just because you want to. Here, 1 
you need a reason. Everybody says, 'What do. 
you want?' This makes it very difficult to 
communicate." 

Even though these students must learn to. 
adapt academically and culturally, the customs 
they will have experienced will always be] 
remembered. A change in perspective is 
common to each and every foreign student. 



144 Academics 





— -John Hanson 
Ben Burrus, junior in LAS, talks with Study Abroad Advisor, 
Larry Neale, about studying second semester in New South 
Wales, Australia. Neale said that University of Illinois has one 
of the largest study abroad programs in the country with over 
700 students studying abroad every year. 

Manchester University junior, Howard Doberman, visited 
the study abroad office to look at some fliers from his 
university in England. Doberman is one of between 100-150 
students from other countries studying at University of Illinois 
this year. 



S! = 



Exchange Students 145 



Changes in orientation 

The university's two-day violence, campus safety, ac- 

orientation program for in- quaintance sexual assault 

coming students and their and bridging different 

parents began June 1. By worlds. In addition, stu- 

the time the last session dents watched a new 

ended, the program had skit dealing with sexual 

helped to prepare more than health issues. 

5,000 students and about Another change in the 

4,500 parents for the Uni- student services session 

versity of Illinois experience, was an introduction to ju- 

The main change that dicial services available 
took place in last summer's on campus, 
orientation agenda was its The main goal of the ori- 
campus issues session, entation programs was to 
Student's watched skits make students feel comfort- 
concerning substance use able about coining to such a 
and abuse, interpersonal large university. 




—Daily Illini file ph. 



Marshall scholars 

Prabal Chakrabarti and Sridhar 
Iyengar, both seniors in Engineer- 
ing, were named as two of this years' 
40 Marshall Scholars. They were 
awarded two years of free tuition 
and fees, travel and living expenses, 
a book allowance and a monthly sti- 
pend to be used at the British uni- 
versity of their choice. 

Their attendance at a school in 
England is contingent upon their ac- 
ceptance. Chakrabarti was in the 
process of applying to the Philoso- 
phy, Politics and Economics depart- 
ment for a second bachelor's degree 
at the University of Oxford. Iyengar 
was interested in pursuing a master's 
degree in physics at the University 
of Cambridge. 



Direct loans 

The Direct Loan Program went 
into effect first semester and 
had a positive effect on students at 
the university. 

The federal government imple- 
mented Direct Loan and piloted it at 
104 colleges and universities. The 
program allows students to receive 
their loans directly in their univer- 
sity accounts instead of going through 
a bank or lending agency. 

About 13,000 students borrowed 
through the program, and as a result 
of its efficiency, 1,000 fewer students 
were encumbered in the fall. 



Cultural workshops 



MWtMIHHl 

In its efforts to enhance the educational expe- 
rience for minority students on campus, the Afri- 
can American Cultural Program created several 
workshops dealing with five different artistic as- 
pects. The activities were open to all students and 
many were housed in the African American Cul- 
tural Center. 

The activities are referred to as workshops be- 
cause of their educational intent and because sev- 
eral are offered for course credit. 

The workshops include WBML, 89.3 FM, the 
cable radio station run completely by volunteers, Griot newsletter giving students an opportunity to 
"Omnimov Dancers" for those interested in dance discuss different issues pertinent to the African- 
and live performances, Theater 263 which focuses American community and the U of I Black Chorus 
on many different aspects of theater, the bimonthly offered as Music 261C. 




photo 



Patent Office 



A seminar held by Jennifer 
Quirk, Assistant Vice Chancel- 
lor for Research, discussed how 
the university will change from 
the use of external patent man- 
agement firms to an in-house 
patent administration. 

The primary mission of in- 
house administration was to pro- 
mote as much university tech- 
nology as possible. It would sup- 
port the development of large 
and small technology and will 
also provide direct feedback to 
the inventors. 



The university will have to as- 
sume the responsibility for all 
costs associated with patenting, 
marketing and liseensing tech- 
nologies . The university would 
establish the Research and Tech- 
n o I o gy M a n a g erne nt f -f-i c e 
(RTMO) to oversee and facili- 
tate the technology transfer. 

The university planned for the 
RTMO to be fully developed and 
operational by 1996. Once de- 
veloped, it would have an ap- 
proximate operating budget of 
$1.3 million. 



Flight simulator 



Lrmtuw-M 



Talbot Laboratory received a new 
flight simulator in January. The 
$150,000 simulated cockpit was built 
for the department of aeronautical 
and astronomical engineering by 
Frasca International Tnc, 

The simulator took one year to 
build and has an enclosed cockpit 
with aircraft controls and switches 
to operate landing gear and flaps. It 
also has two computer screens: one 
for looking outside which simulates 
changing landscape and the other 
shows instrument panel images that 
simulate the controls of airplanes. 



Remodeled classrooms 

Overthesummer of 1994, class- eluded the installation of over- 
rooms in Gregory Hall and other head projectors in every room 
buldings on campus were reno- along with the possibility of air 
vated. The rooms were improved conditioning. 

with new chalkboards, overhead The university planned to spend 

lighting and ceiling fans. $10 million on classroom renova- 

Future plans for renovations tions, but none of the money from 

include repairings walls and ceil- the proposed student tuition in- 

ings and improving seating ar- crease is going to refurbish the old 

rangements. Also, the plans in- classrooms. 



dippings 



New student IDs 

The University began issuing 
new student IDs in November in 
an attempt to phase out the old 
cards. The new hard-card IDs have 
one magnetic strip for student 
identification and another for the 
new debit card system. Up to $30 
dollars worth of credit could be 
stored on the cards at one time . At 
the same time, plans were in the 
works to install new photocopiers 
that were equipped with card read- 
ers at the libraries , residence halls 
and the Illini Union, and card 
readers on vending machines 
across campus. In the future card 
readers could even be implemeted 
in such places as residence hall 
laundry rooms. The new system 
was scheduled to come on-line in 
Jul y of 1995. 



U of I students awarded Emmy 



ivliuvh 6. 1993 



Two university graduate stu- region. The film's producers 

dents won an Emmy from the used photographs, motion video 

National Academy of Television and interviews to show what Sat- 

Arts and Sciences for a docu- urday nights were like in small 

mentary focusing on the Satur- towns. They used Champaign as 

day night rituals of the past and an example of Saturday nights 

present. "Whatever Happened of the past because it had qual- 

to Saturday Night?" won the ity entertainment to attract resi- 

NATAS 1994 College TV pro- dents to the downtown areas 

ductions Emmy for the Midwest where people used to gather. 



Levy resigned 

Chancellor Michael Aiken 
decided last year not to renew 
Stanley Levy's contract after 
Aug. 20, 1994. Levy was the 
Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs, and he remained at 
the university as a professor 
in the College of Education. 
At the time of the decision a 
replacement had not yet been 
chosen nor had a search for 
one been undertaken. 




Stanley Levy 




Campus Acquaintance Rape Education 

Students were given the opportunity to take a class designed to raise 
sexual assault awareness, and they earned class credit while doing so. The 
class was called Campus Acquaintance Rape Education, and students 
could sign up for it under Community Health 240-B1. The grading was on 
a satisfactory/unsatisfactory scale. 

After students completed the classroom part of the course, they were 
able to move on to a practicum designed to teach practical training for the 
presentation of CARE programs. Students usually participated in about 
two to three presentations during a typical month. Programs were usually 
offered to various student clubs, residence halls, fraternity and sorority 
chapters and classrooms. 



SSSS 



Minority degrees 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■iii m mil ii 

Here at the University of Illi- 
nois, the number of under- 
represented groups receiving mas- 
ters or doctorate degrees in 1994 
was less than the nationwide aver- 
age. However, the university main- 
tained that it was still an increase 
from the previous year. This could 
be due to the fact that the university 
advertised, recruited and provided 
increased financial aid. 

The university also provided 
students the chance to attend the 
Summer Research Opportunity 
Program which strived to give 
minority students an idea of what 
it is like to attend graduate school. 
Organizations like La Casa Cul- 
tural Latina and the Asian Ameri- 
can Association were also spear- 
heading similar efforts to encour- 
age their members to go on to re- 
ceive higher degrees. 







Pell Grants 



S.'iu. 30, 1994 



In September, officials of the De- 
partment of Education were con- 
sidering a proposal regarding the 
issuance of Pell Grants to students 
enrolled in English as a Second Lan- 
guage classes. Under the new sys- 
tem, students enrolled in ESL classes 
would be ineligible for the Pell 
Grant. The proposal would be the 
second part of last years reform 
that allowed students to receive their 
loans directly through their univer- 
sities or colleges. 

There was some concern that 
some of the students that utilize 



the Pell Grant, the most popular 
form of federal student aid, would 
be restricted from it under the 
rules of the new proposal. Refu- 
gees and immigrants would be es- 
pecially hard hit by the proposal 
because they would not have the 
opportunity to learn English, and 
without financial aid, they would 
not have had the opportunity to 
enroll in classes. 

The university would not have 
been affected by the proposal be- 
cause it did not have a separate 
ESL program. 



Campus Invasion 6 95 



inia»iMm»« 



Social work 



EaBEEH 



Girl Scouts from across Illi- 
nois gathered at the university 
in February to get an idea of 
what college life is like. Groups 
of scouts attended and partici- 
pated in such things as tours of 
Krannert Center for the Per- 
forming Arts, presentations by 
local sororities and career ses- 



sions held by the Society of 
Women Engineers. 

More than 100 university stu- 
dents volunteered their services 
by leading tour groups and con- 
ducting presentations. The 
weekend was very beneficial in 
swaying some participants to at- 
tend the university. 




Instead of writing the traditional 
term paper for their Social Work 
100 class, students in Julie Pryde's 
class were given the chance to vol- 
unteer 20 hours of their time in- 
stead. Of the 73 students in her 
class , 57 students voluteered an es- 
timated 1,200 hours building houses 
for Habitat for Humanity, working 
with Nite Rides and writing letters 
to prisoners among other things. 
Besides the necessary commitment, 
the students brought holiday gifts to 
The Center for Women in Transi- 
tion on their last day of class. 



cli 



ungs 




__^____ 







WB&nBmsBa 



Minority Career Forum 



EBMaBEEa 



tin American studies 



Hniiii.»i-nM 



In January, the University Board of Trustees 
reviewed a proposal to establish a Masters of Arts 
degree in Latin American and Caribbean Studies in 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 

The program would consist of a three-semester 
interdisciplinary program that would prepare stu- 
dents for a possible career in business, government 
or sncio-cultural studies. 

The necessary courses required for the program 
previously existed under other disciplines; there- 
fore additional funding would not be required. Also, 
there were only expected to be under 20 students 
enrolled in the program, so no additional staff would 
need to be hired. 



On Jan. 27, university juniors and seniors 
had the opportunity to meet and interview with 
more than 40 different corporations and busi- 
nesses in Chicago. Interested students had to 
send in their resumes by Nov. 11 in order to 
receive transportation. 

The Minority Career Forum was put together 
by Crimson and Brown Associates, and spon- 
sored by Anderson Consulting, Arthur Ander- 
son, Hewitt Associates and Leo Burnett Com- 
pany, Inc. 

Fifteen schools in the Midwest were invited to 
participate and about 40 businesses were there to 
conduct interviews. Many students on campus 
were notified of the event through flyers and 
campus organizations like the Latino Association 
for Business. 



Kinesiology classes 



The kinesiology department made 
plans to cut most of their one-hour and 
two-hour classes for non-majors for the 
fall of 1995. There would only be 50 sec- 
tions with 1,000 students as opposed to 
the previous 150 sections with 4,200 stu- 
dents. The budget cuts were part of a 
five-year program to reduce departmen- 
tal funds and help reallocate the funds 
internally throughout the university. 



U of I Direct 



IBSBHKZa 



On April 3, university students finally were scheduled to be 
able to register for classes using any CCSO computer by using 
the U of I Direct system. The system eliminated the hassle and 
confusion of waiting in line at the Armory. Using U of I Direct, 
students could sit down at a terminal and within minutes know 
whether or not classes were available. Also, if a student 
decided to change their schedule, he or she could come back 
onto the system and make the necessary changes before the 
beginning of the next semester. 

Most people viewed the change as beneficial to the univer- 
sity. However, some students wondered why the university had 
not implemented the system before like other major universi- 
ties. Other students felt the computers would cause problems, 
but not in comparison to the Armory system. 





i&ifi^» v -*'i&£4tiKBfe ^£ i 






j^^^^^p^^r^w m 




Ilki- 


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-Daily Illini file photc 






. 



Mike Singletary at U of I 



HBME»bbl,-l 



Mike Singletary spoke to a crowd of about 250 
students at Foellinger Auditorium in February. He 
emphasized the need for personal commitment in or- 
der to be successful. 

Singletary was an all-pro middle linebacker ten times 
during his 12-year career with the Chicago Bears. When 
he was a child he made a commitment to himself to go to 
college. He grew up as the youngest of ten children in 
Houston. When he was 12-years-old his parents di- 
vorced, and his brother Grady was killed by a drunk 
driver. After that, he focused his goals on football. 

Singletary went on to be named the NFL/s Defensive 
Player of the Year twice and is a member of the College 
Football Hall of Fame. His contributions off the field 
included working to promote drug and child abuse edu- 
cation, and he is the spokesperson for Child Abuse 
Prevention Services, Just for Youth, The Mill - a reha- 
bilitation program for troubled youth - and the Lawndale 
Community Center for Underprivileged Kids. 



_- - , 




-Daily Illini file photc 



New UX5 accounts 

Before the start of Fall semes- chine enabled up to 400 people to 
ter, the university only had two log on simultaneously, something 
machines to control student elec- that the old UXA account could 
tronic mail accounts: UXA and not handle. UXA was six years old 
UX4. They both reached their and based on Intel 80386-series 
capacities, so the university pur- processors which had become ob- 
chased a new Sun Micro-systems solete in personal computers. 
Unix mainframe to house 5,000 UX4 and UX5, the more mod- 
new accounts belonging to in- ern machines, were nearly iden- 
coming freshmen. tical to Sun computers with six 

The addition of the new ma- "SuperSPARC" processors that 



run simultaneously. The ma- 
chines had 300 megabytes of 
memory. UX5 had room for 
twenty processors whereas UX4 
only had room for ten. 

CCSO hoped that in the fu- 
ture there would be a new ma- 
chine for every incoming class, 
and any student would be 
able to use any of the CCSO's 
student mainframes. 



Tuition increase 

A 3.5 percent general tuition 
increase was approved for 1996. 
This means that undergraduate 
students would pay an extra 
$100. Freshmen and sopho- 
mores would pay an additional 
$140, which would complete the 
closure of the tuition gap be- 
tween lower- and upper-division 
students. Also, a $1500 tuition 
increase was approved for Mas- 



ters of Business Administration 
students. There was some con- 
cern that the increase would 
make it very difficult for some 
families to afford payments. 

According to the 1996 fiscal 
year budget proposal, the 
tuition increase would serve 
to offset the cost of inflation 
and pay for improvements in 
the university. 



• I 



■ ■■'*'■' 




r\ 




/ 



#7 



^ /tttf 




'"'"'' «i 





egrees of change. For athletic teams at the U of I, these 
changes were not as sharp as in other parts of campus. Yet, 
ecause faces change every four years, each team did indeed see 
ifferences this year. 
Women's volleyball saw the most faces change this past season. The team 
lost six players, so half of this year's team was new and had to compete with- 
out much experience together. Despite this obstacle, the volleyball team 
managed to stay within the upper echelon of the Big Ten, and once again make 
the NCAA Tournament. 

Football was another sport which saw some noticeable change. The Fighting 
Illini saw a return to post-season play after a one-year hiatus. Also, the team saw 
a pleasant change in a bowl game victory, the team's first since the 1989 season. 
Illinois marched into Memphis, Tenn., for the Liberty Bowl and crushed the East 
Carolina Pirates 30-0. 

Non-revenue sports had changes as well. Wrestling and swimming were the 
most noticeable. Not known for national prominence in the past, both programs 
jumped out to strong starts in 1994-95. In fact, wrestling cracked the top ten 
national rankings for the first time ever, finishing in ninth place. Steve Marianetti 
and Ernest Benion both claimed National titles in the NCAA tournament at the 
end of the season. 

At the U of I, the sport may remain the same over a long period, but those who 
play the sport undergo constant changes. Faces change, and individuals grow and 
mature both as an athlete and as a person. Even if a team may finish in the 
same position year after year, there's change going on all around. All you have 
to do is look. 



DEGREES OF 




Eric Schmidt 
Sports Editor 






Football 



Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Ryan Almon and Peggy Christensen 



They are arguably the two most frustrating 
words in sports: "What if...?" That is what Coach 
Lou Tepper and his Fighting lllini football team are 
left to ponder after losing their five games by a 
combined 22 points and none by more than six. 

"Every loss that we had was difficult and that 
was the unusual thing about this season," Tepper 
said. "All five losses that we had are the kind of 
losses that would put a team in atailspin. Anyone 
of them could make a team collapse and this team 
didn't. They kept coming back and playing hard." 

Illinois entered the season with a highly touted 
defense spearheaded by what many experts 
considered the best linebacking corps in the nation. 
Seniors Dana Howard and John Holecek teamed 
up with juniors Simeon Rice and Kevin Hardy and 
were solid to spectacular all season. 

All-American Howard became the Big Ten's 
all-time leading tackier and won the Butkus Award 
as the nation's top linebacker. Meanwhile, Rice 
used a fast start to register a school-record 1 6 
sacks and earned second team All-American 
honors in the process. 

Hoping to capitalize on a friendly schedule that 
included seven home games, the lllini opened the 
season at Soldier Field in Chicago against 
Washington State. However, theabsenceof injured 
running back Ty Douthard coupled with llliniois' 
inability to protect quarterback Johnny Johnson 
spelled trouble for the offense. Despite a herculean 
effort from Rice, the lllini dropped a frustrating 1 0- 
9 decision. Rice was a one-man wrecking crew, 
racking up a school-record five sacks, a blocked 
field goal and a fumble recovery. 

"We did not execute as well as we had hoped 
and that often happens in an opening game," 
Tepper said. "We were without Ty Douthard and 
that was a big loss. Pass protection was probably 
the biggest source of our problems." 

Douthard returned the next week to jumpstart 
the offense against Missouri. The sophomore ran 
through the Tiger defense for 1 26 yards. 
Sophomore Scott Weaver replaced Johnson at 
quarterback and completed 1 1 of 14 passes as the 
lllini dismantled Mizzou, 42-0. But the biggest 
story of the day was Denny Marcin's defense. In 
one of the most dominating defensive performances 
in school history, the lllini limited the Tigers to a single 
first down and a paltry 46 yards of total offense. 

Illinois cruised past Northern Illinois in its final 
tuneupfortheBigTen race. Tepper continued to go 



with the hot hand at quarterback when Johnson 
entered the game in the second quarter and 
sparked the lllini to a 34- 1 win. Johnson passed 
for 222 yards and two touchdowns in regaining 
his starting job. Douthard helped the cause by 
rushing for 1 09 yards. 

Illinois ended its four-game homestand with its 
Big Ten opener against the unheralded Purdue 
Boilermakers. The lllini dug themselves a hole early 
in the game and left it up to their two-minute offense 
to erase a 22-1 6 deficit in the fourth quarter. 

Johnson marched the team into Purdue territory 
and, with just over one minute to play, had a 
game-winning TD pass to Martin Jones nullified by 
a holding penalty. With no timeouts and : 1 left, 
Johnson hit tight end Ken Dilger in the flat, but the 
Boilers closed the hole quickly and stopped Dilger 
just short of the goal line. 

"For whatever reason, that was the most poorly 
played defensive game that we had," Tepper said. 
"That was the only game that I didn't think we 
played with much effort. Purdue was too good of 
a football team for that to happen. It was certainly 
an agonizing loss." 

Once again, the lllini picked themselves up off 
the mat after another tough loss, this time with a 
little added impetus from Howard. In an interview 
earlier in the week, Howard guaranteed that the 
lllini would travel to Ohio State and beat the 
Buckeyes. That is precisely what Illinois did, pulling 
away for a 24-1 victory. 

They escaped Columbus with their sixth win in 
the last seven years against the Bucks thanks to a 
standout performance from Howard. The 6-0, 
236-pound senior registered fourteen tackles, two 
sacks and an interception to thwart an OSU drive. 
Johnson was effective again, connecting on 1 6 of 
2 1 passes and two key TD passes in the second half 
to rally the visitors. 

"Dana didn't mean any harm by the prediction at 
all," Tepper said. "Shoot, as a player I would have 
loved what he said. Asa coach, it's not something that 
you wantto reinforce because you don'twantto have 
those kinds of statements every week." 

Howard could have gotten away with another 
prediction the next week as the lllini pounded 
undermanned Iowa, 47-7. Johnson passed for 
271 yards and three more touchdowns as Illinois 
jumped all over the visiting Hawkeyes early and 
often. Freshman Robert Holcombe continued to 
(story continued on page 157) 



154 Sports 





ohnny Johnson, quarterback for the Mini, 
scrambles with the ball during the Purdue 

game. Illinois lost to the Boilermakers with a 

score of 16-22. 

Ilini quarterback, Scott Weaver, tosses the 

ball downfield against Michigan. Weaver 

replaced Johnny Johnson in the middle of the 

first half and threw two touchdowns to score 

Illinois' only points in the game. 



Football 155 




-Rick Widrae 



Oana Howard, senior linebacker, 
pulls down a Purdue Boilermaker 
running back. Howard was awarded 
the Butkus award in December of 1 994. 



0*enior cornerback Robert Crumpton 
celebrates after he intercepted the 
ball from Michigan. Despite Illinois' 
hard- fought battle, they lost 14-19. 



>Dorts 



(story continued from page 154) 
impress, rushing for 101 yards in the rout. 

At 4-2, Illinois welcomed Michigan to a packed 
Memorial Stadium. However, the lllini shot 
hemselves in the foot with costly fumbles and a 
special teams breakdown in a 1 9- 1 4 loss. Weaver 
:ameoff the bench and rallied the lllini, but Amani 
roomer's punt return proved to be the winning score 
or the Wolverines. The setback all but ended Illinois' 
goal of finishing the season in the Rose Bowl. 

After Illinois' dreams of Pasadena had been 
shattered, Illinois took out its frustrations on upstart 
Nlorthwestern. In a game that was crucial to both 
eam's bowl hopes, Illinois controlled the Wildcats, 
28-7. Rice recorded three sacks and Johnson 
oassed for 256 yards. 

The team moved to 6-3 with a 21-17 win at 
Minnesota. Douthard rallied the lllini with two 
ouchdowns in the fourth quarter, including a 
disputed TD reception with just over 1 :00 left. After 
he Golden Gophers returned the ensuing kickoff 
75 yards, Hardy forced Minnesota standout Chris 
Darkins to fumble at the 5-yard line and Howard 
Dounced on the ball to clinch the win. 

The lllini kept forcing turnovers the next week in 
3 showdown with second-ranked Penn State. 
Ilinoiscapitalized on two early Nittany Lion miscues 
nnd raced to a 21 -0 lead midway through the first 
quarter. However, Penn State kept chipping away 
jnder the direction of star quarterback Kerry 
Collins and capped a remarkable comeback with 
3 touchdown to pull ahead 35-31 with just over 



one minute remaining in the game. Douthard had 
the game of his young career by gaining 176 
yards on the ground. 

After the devastating loss, Illinois travelled to 
Wisconsin for the season finale. Turnovers plagued 
the lllini in the first half, killing three drives deep in 
Wisconsin territory. Illinois could not overcome 
them and suffered their first road loss of the season at 
the hands of the Badgers, 19-13. After the game, the 
lllini accepted an invitation to meet EastCarolina in the 
1 995 Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tenn., a game in 
which they dominated the Pirates, 30-0. 

"We were justoh so close to making it happen," 
Tepper said. "Am I disappointed in that? Yeah, but 
I'd much rather have a 7-5 season that could have 
been 1 0-2 or 1 2-0 then have a 7-5 season where 
we had no chance. I think the team was really 
where we wanted them to be emotionally. 

"We' re obviously notthere yet, butwe' re making 
steps toward being a very competitive team. If we 
can continue to play that kind of defense and our 
offense continues to progress, then we've got a 
chance to be a consistent bowl team." 

The lllini will be hard pressed to improve on the 
defensive unit's effortthisyear. Rice and Hardy will 
return at outside linebacker, while junior Tyrone 
Washington will head an inexperienced secondary. 

"We've got a lot of things to work on," 
Tepper said. "Had we lost the outside linebackers 
(to the NFLdraft), it would have been a complete 
rebuilding year. But we'll use the spring to see 
how capable we are." 



Once again, the offensive line will be a question 
mark entering next season, but the backfield will 
remain intact. Douthard, Holcombe and sophomore 
Damien Piatt return as will both quarterbacks. 

"We have two qualified quarterbacks," Tepper 
said. "We never saw it as a problem. As a 
sophomore, Johnny was peak-and-valley. Against 
Washington State, he exhibited some of those 
same qualities. That's why we gave Scott Weaver 
the chance. Scott is a very steady guy who is going 
to take what the defense gives him. He doesn't 
have the same pension for big plays that Johnny 
has, but he is more conservative and gave us a 
chance to beat Michigan. The competition was 
good for both of them; I think it brought both of 
them to a higher level of performance." 

Regardless of who opens the season under 
center, Douthard will be the focus of the offense. 
Illinois will need his penchant for big games 
against top competition because of a treacherous 
early-season schedule that features four bowl 
teams from a year ago. 

The lllini will host their rematch with Michigan 
before travelling to surprising Oregon, which went 
to the Rose Bowl this year. PAC-1 foe Arizona 
and EastCarolina will give Illinois all itwants in the 
nonconference portion of their schedule. 

"I don't want to paint us into a corner and say 
thatwe've got to come out in a hurry," Tepper said. 
"Butwe're capable and we're not going into itwith 
trepidation. I like playing Michigan first. We'll 
have 72,000 fans here and we'll be excited for it." 




I I 



fc 



IWf 




Johnny Johnson looks downfield for an open 
receiver against the Northwestern Wildcats. 

Illini defensive backs Lloyd Richards and Robert 
Crumpton tackle a Northern Illinois player at 
Memorial Stadium. 



-Doug Filipov 



-Rick Widmer 






Stan 


dings 




Ul 




Opp. 




! 9 


Washington Sk 


ate 10 




! 42 


Missouri 







34 


Northern lllino 


is 10 




16 


Purdue 


22 




24 


Ohio State 


10 




47 


Iowa 


7 




14 


Michigan 


19 




28 


Northwestern 


7 




21 


Minnesota 


17 




31 


Penn State 


35 




13 


Wisconsin 


19 





-Rick Widmer 



Lou Tepper jogs out and waves his hat to the 
crowd before the Michigan game. Tepper has 
been head coach for three years. 

Running back Ty Douthard scrambles with the 
ball during the Missouri game. This year, 
Douthard was Illinois' leading rusher. 



Football 159 




Defensive players 
Simeon Rice and 
Kevin Hardy celebrate 
after a sack against the 
Purdue Boilermakers. 





Illini running back 
Robert Holcombe tries 
to dive over the North- 
western Wildcat de- 
fense at Northwestern. 
The Illini won 28-7. 

Denny Marcin, Illinois' 
Defensive Coach, re- 
acts to a defensive stop 
during the Missouri 
game in September. Illi- 
nois came back from its 
loss the week before to 
Washington State by de- 
feating Missouri 42-0. 



-Kick Widmer 



Football 161 



Liberty 



r -^f : 



^Sr~r A 



mat 



rSE 



» 





Everybody said they didn't want to be there — and with good reason. They had every starter return from 
one of the nation's finest defenses in 1993. In Dana Howard, John Holecek, Simeon Rice and Kevin Hardy, 
they had one of the best group of linebackers college football has ever seen. And the offense was much 
improved in strong-armed, fancy-footed quarterback Johnny Johnson's second year as a starter. 

So by all accounts, the University of Illinois football team's 6-5 regular season record was a big 
disappointment. The Rose Bowl, not the Liberty Bowl, is what this team really wanted. And after Johnson 
said as much in a postgame tirade following the Illini's Nov. 19 loss to Wisconsin, many felt Illinois would 
simply go through the motions in the St. Jude Liberty Bowl against East Carolina in Memphis, Tenn. on 
Dec. 31, 1994. And go through the motions they did — Elvis motions, that is. Offensive linemen Jonathan 
Kerr and Mike Suarez swiveled their hips and swung their arms a la The King after each touchdown as the 
Illini slaughtered the Pirates 30-0, proving that despite some unfortunate setbacks, this was a team with 
heart. Story by Mike Helfgot & Photo by Carlos Miranda 




1 


ifluiiip ify 


tueI 


n \\ 


Standings 


Ul 




Opp. 





Hawaii 


3 





UCLA 


3 


2 


Georgia 


3 





New Mexico 


3 


3 


Georgia Tech 





3 


Georgia Tech 


1 


3 


Vermont 


: 


3 


Farleigh-Dickinson 





3 


Seton Hall 


\ 


3 


Boston College 





3 


Colgate 





3 


Army 








Iowa 


3 


3 


Minnesota 


2 


3 


Michigan 





' 3 


Michigan State 





3 


Wisconsin 





3 


Northwestern 


1 


3 


Purdue 


1 





Indiana 


3 





Penn State 


3 


1 


Ohio State 


3 


1 


Nebraska 


3 


3 


Michigan State 


1 


3 


Michigan 


1 


! 3 


Northwestern 





2 


Wisconsin 


3 


l 3 


Purdue 





3 


Indiana 





3 


Davidson 





3 


James Madison 





3 


William & Mary 


2 


1 


Ohio State 


3 





Penn State 


3 


3 


Minnesota 





1 


Iowa 


3 




NCAA Tournament 




2 


Ball State 


3 





V 




Women's 




Story by Greg Lewickyj • Photos by Rick Widmer • Layout by Peggy Christensen and Ryan Almon 



Earning a bid to the NCAA tournament for the 
tenth consecutive year, the women's volleyball 
team once again proved itself to be one of the most 
successful and exciting teams on campus. With a 
23- 1 4 overall record and a 1 2-8 record in the Big 
Ten, the team finished in fourth place in the 
conference and earned the right to host Ball State 
in the first round of the tournament. 

The most notable aspect of this year's team was 
the massive personnel changes that took place 
over the off-season. With some playersgraduating, 
others having finished their eligibility and some 
leaving for personal reasons, the team lost a total 
of eight players from last year's team. Included in 
this list are such notable standouts as Tina Rogers 
and Kristin Henrikson, both of whom were All-Big 
Ten performers last season. As well as the loss of 
players, there was also the departure of both 
assistant coaches, Jay Potter and Disa Johnson. 

These positions, of course, had to be filled. The 
lllini restocked themselves with five freshman, one 
junior college transfer and one walk-on with the 
hopes of maintaining a team capable of playing at 
the highest levels. The biggest hopes of this group 
rested on the shoulders of freshman outside hitter 
Erin Borske out of Chicago Stagg High School, 
and a duo of setters, freshman Amy Hrischuk from 
Salem, Wis. and junior college transfer Jessica 
Lee. The assistant coaching jobs were filled by 
Maurice Batie and Nao Ikedo. All of this meant 
that there were more changes during this past off- 
season than there were under previous head 
coach, Mike Hebert, who spent eleven years with 
the program. 

Because of these changes it was very difficult for 
the team to have a sense of where they were going, 
or what their expectations for the season should 
be. "We started off in the pre-season not knowing 
what to expect from this team," said senior co- 
captain Julie Edwards. 

"Wewere unsure of the kind of talent that we had 
at that point in the season," said senior Sue Nucci 
echoing the words of Edwards. Of particular concern 
was the duo of new setters. They both broughtdifferent 
qualities to the team, and the winner of the job was 
very much in doubt at the outset of the season. The 
players and coaches, however, responded very well 
and quickly adapted themselves to the team and 



164 Snorts 



their roles on it. "At first it was a hard adjustment 
for us, but after some time everyone became 
aware of what they had to do," said Nucci. 

The volleyball team was tested early with one of its 
toughest non-conference schedules in recent history. 
The team's first three matches were against top 20 
teams, including the then number four team in the 
country, Hawaii. The team lost all three of these 
matches and returned for its home match, where 
they suffered a loss to New Mexico. "At that point 
we could have just packed it in, butwe didn't, and 
we found ourselves fighting back to get it together," 
said Edwards. The team then captured two wins 
over Georgia Tech in back-to-back matches and 
went to the JH Oaks Invitational where they swept 
the tournament in 1 8 straight games. 

The Big Ten season opened on a very sour note. 
Three game lost to Iowa left the team very 
disappointed. Then there was a change. One of 
the characteristics which stands out most on this 
team is its desire and its ability to keep its competitive 
level high. These traits shined through the evening 
following their loss to Iowa in their match against 
Minnesota. In one of the most exciting and hard 
fought victories of the season, the lllini captured a 
five game win and catapulted themselves onto a 
six match winning streak in the conference. 

'This is the hardest working and exciting team 
at Illinois since I've been here," said Edwards in 
discussing the ability of this team to come back 
after tough matches. 

This winning streak took the lllini to the top of the 
Big Ten, and had the team realizing its abilities. 
The tide soon turned as the team dropped its next 
four matches, three of which were against the top 
teams in the Midwest, including a non-conference 
match with perennial power, Nebraska. Once 
again, though, the team members found themselves 
unable to give up. They came back to win eight of 
their next nine matches, virtually guaranteeing 
themselves a spot in the tournament. 

Perhaps most interesting in the development of 
the team was its balance. "Without an offensive 
powerhouse we were more well-rounded than in 
years past," said Nucci. 

The team relied on several people to carry the brunt 

of the hitting and concentrated on other aspects of 

(story continued on page 1 67) 

Hini setter Amy Hrischuk prepares to 

set the ball against Purdue at Huff 

Hall. Hrischuk filled a crucial hole on the 

team that was left empty with the 

graduation and transfer of teammates. 



..:•;.:. 





Erin Borske, freshman outside hitter, 
bumps the ball. Borske lead the 
team in digs and was named Big Ten 
freshman of the year. 

Junior middle blocker, Megan Stettin, 
reacts after the lllini lost in the first 
round of the NCAA tournament. The 
lllini lost to Ball State in a five game 
heart-breaker. 




166 Sports 




Julie Edwards, senior outside hittter, 
celebrates v/ith her teammates after 
a kill early in the season. Edwards, 
team co-captain, lead the team in kills. 




(story continued from page 164) 
their game. The women's volleyball team stressed 
and improved upon ball control. Another area in 
which the the team felt it was strong in was its serving, 
surprising many opponents with its abilities here. 

Individual performers also found themselves 
coming to the foreground. Edwards was selected 
to the All-Big Ten, with her team leading 476 kills 
and 332 digs, 25 short of the team record. 
Edwards proved herself again and again as the 
leader on the floor and as the most solid player on 
the team. She was chosen as the Big Ten Player of 
the Week after having gathered 80 kills over five 
matches in five days towards the end of the season. 



Erin Borske proved she was one of the best high 
school volleyball players in the state. Borske was 
recognized as the Big Ten Freshman of the Year 
after setting an Illinois freshman record with 452 
kills. She also set an Illinois record with eight 20 kill 
matches, showing her ability to take over matches 
with her powerful left-handed swings. Borske also 
tied Edwards for the team lead in digs. "In the end 
we achieved everything that we set out to," said 
Nucci. Although disappointed with their loss to 
Ball State in the NCAA, they realize their season 
was a success. With the return of Borske and the 
maturation ofHrischuktheteam is looking forward 
to their future. 



The team will miss the presence of three 
outstanding players, however. The graduation of 
Edwards, Nucci and senior co-captain Amy 
Brickley will greatly affect the the face of the team. 
The departing players are also going to miss the 
program at Illinois and everything attached to it. "I 
have enjoyed playing here so much the last four 
years," said Edwards. "You always know that the 
program and the fans are 1 00 percent behind you." 

The fans and the support of the team are among 
the best in the country, and this is not lost on the 
players. "I'm really going to miss playing in Huff 
Hall and all of the support that we receive there," 
said Nucci. 

Women's Volleyball 167 




I 




Story by Dan Ryan • Photos by Rick Widmer • Layout by Ryan Almon and Peggy Christensen 




Robert Bennett slams home the 
opening bucket in llinois' Big Ten 
win over Indiana. The lllini scored their 
second straight win against the Hoosiers 
at Assembly Hall in Champaign. 



Expectations were high for this year's lllini 
basketball team. Coach Lou Henson's squad 
appeared in several preseason polls and was a 
legitimate contender for the Big Ten title. A 
dynamic backcourt of sophomore KiwaneGarris 
and junior Richard Keene was heralded as one 
of the conference's best. Both sophomore forward 
Jerry Hester and senior center Shelly Clark had 
shown flashes of offensive brilliance last year 
and now they could build on one year of 
experience around the rugged Big Ten circuit. 
Even the ultimate compliment - talk of a return to 
the glory days of the 1 989 Flying lllini - spread 
across the campus. 

"It's an honor being compared to them," 
Hester said in November. "Hopefully we can live 
up to some of the things that they did on that 
team. Comparisons are all right, but we want to 
have our own identity." 

Despite all of these positives, Illinois entered 
the season a relatively young team with little 
depth, a shortcoming that concerned Henson. 

"I'm concerned about the youth of the guys on 
the bench," Henson said. "That's our main 
concern right now. We have so many unknowns." 

Unfortunately, preseason promise did not 
translate into the success that Orange and Blue 
fans had anticipated. After an eye-opening 1 3- 
3 start, Illinois limped to a 1 9-1 1 regular season 
record ( 1 0-8 in the Big Ten) before losing to Tulsa 
in the first round of the NCAA tournament. 

The lllini opened the 1 994-95 season by 
winning their first three contests en route to the 
San Juan ShootoutChampionship. Garris earned 
tourney MVP honors after his 27-point 
performance in the title game sealed matters for 
Illinois. Freshman Jerry Gee and Hester, both 
forwards, enjoyed impressive performances in 
San Juan as well. 

Then, in their biggest non-conference game 
of the year, the lllini met perennial power Duke 
in a December showdown at Chicago's new 
United Center. Despite 34 points combined from 
Garris and Keene, the Blue Devils prevailed 
down the stretch, 70-65. 

Henson's club increased its record to 6-1 by 



>orts 



claiming its 16th lllini Classic title in as many 
years. Senior forward Robert Bennett, the Classic's 
MVP, keyed a 59-37 victory over Princeton with 
1 6 points and six rebounds. 

In its second test of the year, the lllini helped 
christen the new Kiel Center in St. Louis when 
they met Missouri in their annual border war. 
Illinois suffered its second consecutive loss on a 
new neutral court when they disappeared in the 
second half, 76-58. Illinois went for 1 3 from 
beyond the three-pointarc and ended up shooting 
a frigid 27 percent after the break. 

Things did not get any easier for the Orange 
and Blue when they travelled to Connecticut. A 
highly-ranked UConn team ran away from Illinois 
for a 71 -56 win. Once again, the second half 
proved to be the I Mini's downfall, for they only 
trailed by two at half-time. 

But Illinois bounced back in dramatic fashion 
in reeling off four straight wins to open Big Ten 
play. After defeating conference doormats Ohio 
State and Northwestern, the lllini stunned a 
formidable Purdue team on its home floor, 62- 
58. Keene's three from the corner in the last 
minute gave Illinois a rare road win in the Big Ten 
and put them in the driver's seat with a 3-0 
conference record. 

In the biggest home game of the year, Illinois 
upended Indiana, 88-81. Keene kept the lllini 
ahead in the first half with his outside shooting 
and passing. After sleepwalking through a 
scoreless first half, Hester awoke to hit six three- 
pointers and victimize the Hoosiers for 1 9 points. 
His treys keyed a 20-4 run that put the lllini up for 
good. 

At 4-0 and in sole possession of first place in 
the Big Ten, the wheels came apart on Illinois' 
season. They lost at home to talented Michigan 
and Michigan State teams and on the road to 
Minnesota. The gradual emergence of Clark was 
overshadowed by Illinois' poor shooting, a 
shortcoming thatwould hauntthe team all season. 

A stunning upset at Iowa's Carver- Hawkeye 

Arena stopped the bleeding. The lllini registered 

itsonlyvictoryoftheyearaftertrailingatthehalf 

(story continued on page 170) 

Kiwane Garris places a lay-up in 
over Indiana defenders at the 
University of Illinois Assembly Hall. 
Garris led the lllini in a win over their 
Big Ten rival, the Hoosiers, by 78-67. 



m 




Illini forward Jerry Hester goes up for 
a shot against UIC. The Illini won by 
a score of 75-60. 

Illinois' Richard Keene tries to drive 
past a Purdue defender at Mackey 
Arena in West Lafayette, Ind. The Illini 
beat the Boilermakers, 78-67. 



Ill 


U 


Ul 




Opp. 


89 


American-Puerto 


Rico 75 


65 


College of Charleston 57 


85 


Virginia Tech 


75 


65 


Duke 


70 


76 


Kansas State 


69 


71 


Northeastern Illinois 53 


59 


Princeton 


37 


75 


Illinois at Chica< 


30 60 


90 


Mercer 


66 


58 


Missouri 


76 I 


56 


Connecticut 


71 


86 


Memphis 


76 


79 


Ohio State 


70 


82 


Northwestern 


55 


62 


Purdue 


58 


78 


Indiana 


67 


59 


Michigan 


69 


66 


Minnesota 


77 \ 


1 67 


Michigan State 


i 75 


I 79 


Iowa 


74 


j 60 


Wisconsin 


73 


67 


Penn State 


58 


104 


Iowa 


97 1 


58 


Michigan State 


i 68 


94 


Minnesota 


88 


51 


Michigan 


63 


85 


Indiana 


89 \ 


! 56 


Purdue 


69 


| 99 


Northwestern 


57 I 


82 


Ohio State 
NCAA Tournami 


63 j 
*nt 


62 


Tulsa 


68 1 




Season Recorc 


/ \ 




19-12 






s.70 Sports 



(story continued from page 168) 
thanks to clutch performances from Bennett, 
Garris and Keene. Their 62 percent shooting 
from the field helped keep a charging Hawkeye 
team at bay in the 79-74 triumph. 

After a frustrating loss at Wisconsin, Illinois 
returned home to win the next two. Included in 
this mini-streak was a 1 04-97 overtime victory 
over Iowa. Illinois victimized the Hawkeyes once 
again with an amazing comeback at the end of 
regulation. Garris keyed the win with 27 points 
and earned Big Ten Player of the Week honors 
in the process. 

Eleven days later, Illinois pulled out another 
overtime thriller against Minnesota, 94-88. 
Bennett came through with a career-high 24 
points to go with 1 1 boards. A balanced offensive 
effort helped the Illini explode for 21 points and 
pull away from the Gophers in overtime. 

Illinois dropped its next three ballgames and 
was suddenly in danger of missing out on what 
had previously been a certain berth in the NCAA 



Tournament. Garris rebounded from a late- 
season slump, however, to spark the Illini to easy 
victories over Northwestern and Ohio State. 

"I think we had an up-and-down season," 
Keene said of the streaky Illini. "We'd come out 
and play really good at times and then the next 
game we'd be down. We just didn't play 
consistent enough. We had a good team, butwe 
just didn't get it rolling right." 

Illinois drew the 1 1 th seed in the East regional 
and a first-round matchup with a deceiving Tulsa 
club. A Sweet 1 6 qualifier the year before, the 
Golden Hurricane returned again after rallying 
past Illinois, 68-62. The season-ending loss was 
in many ways a microcosm of the season. 

Another dismal shooting performance in the 
second half allowed Tulsa to creep back into the 
contest. The favorites capitalized with a four- 
point play late in the game capped Tulsa's 
comeback. The Illini, which had owned a double- 
digit lead for most of the game, ended the 
frustrating campaign at 19-1 2. 



M^^i&^ 






• 



■ ■ 










44 



I 





^helly Clark tries to fake out a Duke 
^University defender at the United 
Center in Chicago. The Mini are 
scheduled to play another non- 
conference game in the United Center 
in the winter of 1 995. 




Ilini Head Coach Lou Henson screams 
at a Big Ten referee while his team 
battled the Indiana Hoosiers. Henson' s 
four-game Big Ten winning streak at 
the start of the season tied his 1989 
record as coach of the lllini. 



|U| ark Heldman, freshman guard, 
frl breaks away from a Northwestern 
opponent during their game against the 
Vildcats in Evanston. Heldman helped 
be lllini blow out Northwestern 82-55. 



Men's Basketball 173 





|A| 








Stan 


dings 




Ul 




Opp. 




87 


Southern lllino 


is 70 




72 


Maine 


68 




82 


Louisville 


75 




75 


Xavier 


57 




76 


Illinois State 


61 




65 


Miami of Ohic 


3 63 




70 


Illinois-Chicag 


o 56 




51 


Iowa 


59 




56 


Northwestern 


76 




63 


Purdue 


81 




47 


Alabama 


84 




59 


Indiana 


84 




68 


Minnesota 


54 




68 


Michigan 


64 




47 


Wisconsin 


76 




63 


Penn State 


75 




66 


Ohio State 


93 




69 


Michigan 


74 




46 


Minnesota 


92 




85 


Indiana 


79 




I 65 


Michigan Stat 


e 94 




52 


Purdue 


66 




62 


Northwestern 


71 




61 


Iowa 


69 







Women's Basketball 

Story by Greg Lewickyj • Photos by Rick Widmer • Layout by Peggy Christensen and Ryan Almon 



Kathy Lindsey is in her fifth year as head 
coach for the women's basketball team, and 
she is finally hoping to see the program turn 
around and show some success. It has been a 
difficult four years for Lindsey, but this year's 
team is starting to bring itself together and 
seems to be on the way to establishing the 
program as competitive. At 9-8 overall, 2-5 in 
the Big Ten, at about the midpoint of the 
season the team is looking for its first winning 
season since 1 986-87. 

"I definitely think that the program has 
improved. The numbers, in terms of winning 
percentages, are not as good as we would have 
hoped for at this point, but we are definitely 
making improvements this season," said Lindsey. 

There were many questions about the team 
coming into this year. The loss of three seniors, 
all of whom were significant contributors, left 
the team with many holes to fill. Lindsey used 
the opportunity to bring in a full complimentof 
talented freshmen. There are a total of seven 
freshmen on the team, five of which are 
scholarship players. This means that there are 
more new people on the team than there are 
returnees from last year. A big question for 
this team then becomes its experience. 

The talent level of the freshmen has never 
been doubted. At the outset of the season the 
most immediate concern was how this group of 
young women would respond to college level 
athletics and everything that goes along with 
that. Floor leadership and experience are also 
areas in which the team was worried about. 

"Those three players that we lost were 
great people and great floor leaders for us. 
There have been many times when we have 
missed their experience," said Lindsey. 

One person that the team has relied on 
heavily for her experience is fourth year starter, 
Kristina Dupps. Dupps is currently in seventh 
place on the Illinois all-time scoring list and 



fourth on the all-time rebounding list. Because 
of her accomplishments and being the only 
senior on the team, she has been put into the 
role of leader as well as teacher. 

"The start of the year was very slow for us. We 
had to spend a lot of time teaching the younger 
players the system and preparing them for a 
higher level of competition," said Dupps. 

Dupps is very impressed, however, with how 
hardworking and competitive these women are 
and how quickly they have adjusted themselves 
to the college game. She is also quick to realize 
her position on the team and is willing to help 
with the teaching process. "I need to be the floor 
leader and to try to be a coach on the floor 
sometimes," said Dupps, adding, " that does not 
say that I don't make mistakes myself." 

In fact, she is aware that it is making 
mistakes that the team will improve. 

"We have to make the mistakes in order to 
learn," stated Dupps, pointing outthat playing 
the game is the best way for this group of 
women to perform at a higher level. 

Junior Aimee Smith also stresses the 
importance of teamwork. 

"As these young women gain experience 
and we all learn to play together as a unit we 
will start to see ourselves improve as a team," 
said Smith. 

Judging from the start of the season, the 
team has been quite successful at improving 
its play. The team got off to one of its best 
starts ever with an impressive 7-2 non- 
conference record. Among these wins was an 
exciting overtime victory over Louisville at 
home and a couple of big road wins at Illinois 
State and Miami of Ohio. 

The team then opened its Big Ten season 

and ran into some very tough competition. 

With three of its first four conference games 

on the road, they were aware that this was 

(story continued on page 176) 

reshman Krista Reinking looks for 
an open teammate against Purdue. 
During the season, the team lost a 
number of important players due to 
injuries, including Reinking, v/ho 
suffered from stress fractures. 



174 Sports 



:K**£ 







^^ w& ... 



ophomore Marchoe Dill drives past 
a Purdue player in Huff Gym. The 

team was looking for its first winning 

season since 1986-87. 

imee Smith begins to penetrate 
into an open lane during a game 
against Purdue in Huff Gym. There 
were more new people on the 
team this year than returnees from 
last year. 





(story continued from page 1 74) 
going to be a very difficult part of their schedule. 
The lllini lost all four of these games as well as a 
non-conference match-up with Alabama. 

In many ways the cause of this losing streak was 
injuries. The team found themselves with some 
critical members of the team missing games, 
including freshman Krista Reinking suffering from 
stress fractures. The biggest loss to the team was 
when Anita Clinton tore her anterior cruciate 
ligament and was lost for the season. Clinton had 
been showing herself to be one of the more 
dominating players having posted career-highs of 
9 points in games this season and with 
three double-doubles in eight games. 

ated some very obvious problems 



for the team. The younger players were all of a 
sudden expected to step-up and they all had to 
adjust their positions in the rotation. And this does 
not even mention the much stronger competition 
within the Big Ten. 

"Itwas not thatwe were not playing well, itwas 
that we had problems putting together entire 
games. We would play really well for one half and 
then have trouble playing that well for the other 
half," said Smith. 

But once again the team showed its abilities to 
overcome its problems and to play very well. The 
lllini won two of their next three games improving 
their record to 2-5 in the conference. One of these 
wins was a very big win over Minnesota who was 
ranked 24th in the country at the time. 



With six of their last nine games at home the 
team is looking forward to an improved seconc 
half of the season. 

"I think we are in a position to do well in the seconc 
half of our season. If we play well we can be in c 
position to ma ke the NCAA tou rnament as the Big Ter 
is such a strong conference," said Lindsey. 

"I don't think it is unrealistic to finish in fourth oi 
fifth place in the Big Ten," said Dupps. 

The team is also looking forward to the new Bic 
Ten Tournament that will be held in Indianapolis 
this spring. 

"Regardless of if it does or does not happen foi 
us this year the program will get there with thi< 
group of women," said Dupps. And indeed the 
future looks bright. 

enior Kris Dupps fights with a Minn 

esota player for possession of tha 

ball during a game in Huff Gym. Durind 

the 1994-95 season, Dupps placed 

seventh on the Illinois all-time scorind 



176 Sports 



list and fourth 
rebounding list. 



on the all-time 




■ 



Lindsey Durlacher feels the pain 
during a match against Eastern 
Illinois wrestler David Pena at Huff Hall 
on December 17, 1994. Durlacher 
wrestled at the 1 18 pound weight class. 





... 

St< 


mi 


di 


n 


gs 


Ul 


Opp. 


36 


SlU-Edwardsville 7 


28 


Northern Illinois 6 


19 


Purdue 23 


30 


Eastern Illinois 1 6 


13 


Minnesota 29 


19 


Northwestern 1 9 


10 


Michigan State 30 


23 


Ferris State 1 8 


7 


Indiana 28 


22 


Illinois State 9 


6 


Ohio State 24 | 


24 


Northern Iowa 1 5 1 


48 


Valparaiso 3 


Bit 


g Ten Championships 




Ninth Place 



V 

^K^ 



j \ ' . 




;;-■ P /-'jP^fe^ 






Wrestlin 



Story by Dan Ryan • Photos by Rick Widmer • Layout by Anna Nommensen 

Of all the Illinois sports programs on the rise, a dual meet in the conference. The squad ended "I was a little frustrated because I lost a lot of 

none can match the rapid ascent of coach Mark up a deceptive ninth atthe Big Ten meet in March my fifteen matches in the last few seconds," 

Johnson's wrestlers. Johnson has resurrected despite some brilliant individual performances Vaughn said. "That shows that I only have a 

llliniwrestlingsincearrivingatlllinoistwo seasons last year. small step to make to be at the next caliber." 

ago. The former Olympian brought a plan for SteveMarianetti at 142 pounds strung together Fellow freshman Lindsey Durlacher (118 

success that he designed in his ten years as an his second All-American season in as many pounds), junior Steve Rusk (177 pounds) and 

assistant coach for national powerhouse Iowa, years. Marianetti finished second in the Big Ten senior Lance Pelton (1 90 pounds) rounded out 

and the results are amazing. and fifth in the nation while inching closer to Illinois' NCAA qualifiers. With most of the team 

Illinois has posted consecutive winning becoming Illinois' all-time win leader. After a returning and a preseason appearance at number 

seasons for the first time in 20 years and successful summer that saw Marianetti capture a 24 in the polls, Marianetti and the lllini are 

qualified an impressive five wrestlers for the gold medal at the U.S. Olympic Festival, he looking to take the next step this year. 

NCAA tournament last year. As the upward needs just nine more victories to rewrite the "We made a lot of mistakes last year that this 

swing continues, the lllini are learning to record books. year we are going to correct," Marianetti said, 

believe in themselves, a confidence that was "Steve's definitely a leader on the mat," "We still have a lot of young guys, but they're 

not always there in the past. "We have more Johnson said. "He's a quiet leader and a very ambitious guys. Coach Johnson is a great 

self-confidence," sophomore Ernest Benion hard worker. When you can do it on and off the motivator and has a great presence about him. 

said. "Although we did have a winning season mat like he can, he's the kind of kid you want in Our coaching staff knows how to push their 

and we did make improvements, everybody your program." athletes. They know what we need to do to 

was still getting used to Mark Johnson's Seth Brady joined his collegiate teammate in accomplish things. They have a really good 

program. This year we believe we're better. thewinner'scircleattheOlympic Festival in July, success formula and a structured program, which 

Everybody believes in the system now." Brady, who will be pushed by freshman Pete we were lacking before." 

When Johnson arrived, there were only two Marx, is coming off a .500 season in which he Although Vaughn was the only freshman in 

state champions in the room for his first practice, often went up against heavier opponents, his class to contribute immediately, prospects 

In a punishing conference such as the Big Ten, Nonetheless, his summer performance has such as Jeff Bellows, Dan Collins, Tim Deaton, 

where nine teams are ranked heading into the Johnson expecting more from Brady in his second Jevon Herman, Pete Marx, Jason Pero, Karl 

season, that spelled trouble. He promptly year. "We're counting on Seth to be more of a Roesler and Eric Siebert will provide depth in the 

assembled the number two and number seven finisher for us this year," Johnson said. "At times practice room and might break into the lineup, 

recruiting classes in the nation by convincing last year, he had trouble adjusting because he The lllini are looking to progress into the Big 

some of Illinois' best prep wrestlers to stay close was a rather small heavyweight. This year, we Ten's upper division this season. If successful, a 

to home. need him to reach that next level for us." top-five finish in the conference should earn 

"Our program is definitely going in the right True freshman Jon Vaughn burst into the Illinois a spot in the top ten nationally, 

direction," Johnson said. "The recruiting classes lineup last year and was a consistent winner for However, some lllini have grander things in 

obviously help the competition in the practice the lllini at 134 pounds. Vaughn registered 25 mind come March. "The optimal goal is to be Big 

room. These guys are quality athletes and they're wins, good for third on the team behind Marianetti Ten champions and NCAA champions," Benion 

already pushing guys at their weight class." and Benion. He capped an impressive debut by said. "It's a very high goal that we've set. I don't 

Illinois finished the 1 993- 1994 season 7-5-1 , qualifying for the NCAA championships after a know whether we'll do it this year, but it's 

but left room for improvement after failing to win seventh-place showing at the Big Ten's. definitely attainable." 

teve Marianetti v/restles with Chad 

Surles of Eastern Illinois at Huff 
Hall. Marianetti, the -winner of the 
match, also captured a gold medal last 
summer at the U.S. Olympic Festival. 



Wrestling 179 



Rugby 



Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Monica Soltesz and Peggy Christensen 



"Do your part, don't try to be a hero." This 
statement made by sophomore Seth Davidow 
exemplifies the attitude that makes a good rugby 
player. Above all else it is the goal of the team to 
work together as a unit, and through their 
teamwork will come their success. 

Rugby, as the team members are quick to 
point out, is not like football. Club president Paul 
Duquaine pointed out that rugby "needs to be 
played as a team." He also said that one or two 
stars cannot carry a team, unlike football where 
a key player or two can have a great impact on 
the game. It was also stressed that it is not 
importantwhich individual scores the points, but 
that the team scores the points as a whole. 

In order to achieve this kind of team chemistry 
the players need to be extremely well prepared, 
both mentally and physically. Senior Brian 
Dotterer does not ask his fellow players to be 
something that they are not, only that they make 
a strong commitment to the team and to their 
preparation for the games. "The willingness to 
work hard - very hard," is what Dotterer wants 
to see from his teammates. This commitment is 
seen in his strong work ethic. In addition to the 
two practices a week with the team, Dotterer 
works out with weights six days a week and runs 
six to ten miles a week. Do not think for a moment 
that this is the exception either; most of the 
players work out quite extensively on their own 
lifting weights and jogging. 

Another quality that makes for a good rugby 
player is experience, which is a problem area for 
this year's team. "The only way to learn the 
game is from playing it," said Davidow, whose 
father taught him the game while he was in high 



school. Because several players from last year 
graduated, many members of this year's team 
have no more than one full year of experience. 
Duquaine said that the 1994-1995 team has 
some very good talent, but needs more experience 
to fully develop this talent and to become 
successful. Some of the things that Duquaine is 
looking for the younger players to do is to lose 
some of their tentativeness and to have more 
drive on the playing field - qualities that are 
difficult to acquire on the practice field. 

The team does expect to be very competitive 
this year, especially against opponents on the 
collegiate level. Lastyear in collegiate competition 
the team did very well winning the first round of 
the Illinois Collegiate tournamentand advancing 
to the Midwest Junior Cup. "We did well without 
a lot of guys with experience," said Duquaine. 
"Againstundergradteamswedidwell. Generally 
we stomped them." Against men's teams, those 
consisting of players who are older and more 
experienced, the team does figure to have its 
troubles like they did last year. 

Continued work and commitment are the 
standbys of the rugby team. "We need the full 
dedication of all of the players every week," said 
Dotterer. In order to be a good, cohesive team, 
all of the players realize the importance of their 
being a part of the team and of the commitment 
that they must make to it. With this, the team 
hopes to win this year and to build a team that 
will continue to be successful for the years to 
come. Thereisalso the hope thatalong with continued 
success would come an awareness of rugby on 
campus. The team would love to see some fans that 
are as dedicated to the game as they are. 




180 Sports 



^^^^r^^t^tHr 






— Joel Rennich 

n Illinois rugby player 
attempts to stop his 
opponent during a match in 
the 1994-95 season.Last year 
in collegiate competition the 
team did very well winning 
the first round of the Illinois 
Collegiate tournament. 

n lllini team member 
surges ahead with the 
ball during one of their 
games. The team hopes that 
they will be able to succeed 
by working together as a 
unit. 



Standings 



Opponents 

Old Boys (Alumni) 

Notre Dame 

Southern Illinois 

Illinois State 

Eastern Illinois 

Western Illinois 

Northern Illinois 

Springfield 



Rugby 181 










Women's Hockey 

Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Colleen Christensen 



One of the least known teams on campus is 
the women's hockey team. Although the team 
has existed since 1 986, very few people are 
awareofthe team. This had led to many problems 
threatening the team's existence including a lack 
of funds, difficulty finding volunteer coaches and 
trouble attracting younger players to the team 

Things are turning around for the team, though. 
One of the most important developments is the 
creation of the Central District Hockey League, 
allowing for more organized divisions and better 
competition. Another change starting to come 
about is the increase in attendance, something 
very exciting for the women who have been on 
the team for a couple of years. Most dramatic in 
terms of change is the tremendous number of 
women that have joined the team this year, 
especially the large number of freshman and 
sophomores. In fact, there are enough women to 
have two teams in the league, one consisting of 
more experienced women which will face more 
experienced opponents. 

"The game provides an opportunity for women 
to try something new," said club president and 
Agriculture senior Patricia Lee. 

Some of the women who join the team do not 
even know how to skate, let alone how to play 
hockey. "Last year was a definite learning 
experience for me, I had only been on skates 
three times in my life before this," said Joselle 
Buan, junior in LAS . 

Being admittedly intimidated by the thought 
of joining the team, Buan needed some hard 
pushing from her brother to finally do it. Once on 
the team, however, her attitude quickly changed. 
Impressed by everyone's willingness to help her 
to learn and the encouragement she received 
from her teammates, she was soon sold on the 
team. "I liked it so much that I'm playing again 



this year," said Buan. 

Other members of the team have been on 
skates for about as long as they can remember. 
First year graduate student Desiree Thompson 
has been skating for 1 5 years, and has been a 
member of this team for five. Being a veteran of the 
team, she is very excited about the formation of the 
new league, and the teams chances within it. 

"It would be great to win our league," said 
Thompson. "And we have beaten all of the 
teams at one point in the past few years, so 
you never know." 

She is quick to point out that the stability that 
the team has found is the most exciting and 
important thing for the team, especially in the 
numbers of younger women. 

In talking with the team members, two ideas 
came to the foreground: teamwork and having 
fun. As can be seen in Buan's case, team 
encouragement and support meant a great deal 
to her continuing as a member. With the large 
number of new players, this concept becomes 
very important to the success of the team. The 
more experienced players are trying to instill 
certain qualities among the younger players: 
teamwork, commitment and the importance of 
always working. "Those players that improve the 
most are the scrappy players - those always 
trying," said Lee. 

Having fun is an absolute must. The team 
wants to be there because they are enjoying 
themselves. "It's just a lot of fun being out there," 
said Thompson. 

High energy and enthusiasm are also marks 
of a team that clearly enjoys itself and wants to 
make itself known on campus. To all of the 
women who are thinking of joining the team: "It's 
also one of the most unique experiences you will 
ever have," said Buan. 




182 Sports 



{. 



V 



> 







n a team scrimmage, Shannon 
Smith, Illinois team member #30, is 

trying to block her opponent, senior 

Nicole Kilcoin, from reaching the puck. 

The women's hockey team has existed 

since 1986. 




aige Cooper, a graduate student 

on the women's hockey team, is 

taught a play by coach Andy Lund. A 

large number of women have joined the 

team this year compared to past years. 



Women's Hockey 183 





Ul Opp. 

1 Springfield Junior Blues 5 

1 Danville Junior Wings 5 

2 Iowa State University 7 
6 Iowa State University 4 
10 Marquette University 3 

4 University of Wisconsin 3 
8 University of Minnesota 3 
6 Eastern Michigan University 1 

5 Eastern Michigan University 2 
1 Springfield Junior Blues 5 

4 University of Michigan 4 

3 University of Michigan 5 
1 Penn State University 4 

6 Penn State University 3 

5 Eastern Michigan University 1 

4 Eastern Michigan University 5 

6 University of Wisconsin 4 

5 University of Wisconsin 2 
8 University of Michigan 7 

6 University of Michigan 4 

1 Penn State University 5 

6 Penn State University 10 

2 West Virginia University 5 

1 Ohio University 3 

3 Ohio University 2 

2 Indiana University 3 

7 Indiana University 1 

2 Iowa State University 5 
1 Iowa State University 4 
1 8 Kent State University 1 
7 Kent State University 

3 Towson State University 2 
1 Towson State University 2 



Story by Dan Ryan • Photos by Rick Widmer • Layout by Peggy Christensen and Ryan Almon 



For the Fighting lllini hockey team, the year was 
a season of streaks. The lllini registered some of 
their biggest wins in club history and advanced to 
the national tournament for the second straight 
year before settling for fifth place. 

"We felt we had a really strong team going into 
the season," senior forward Kurt Penn said. "We 
started off well and then hit some down points. We 
should've won some games that we didn't, but we 
played strong." 

After dropping their first two games, the lllini 
ripped off a seven-game winning streak. Included 
in the tear was a sweep of Iowa State, the first 
time they had swept the Cyclones on the road in 
over 20 years. 

The lllini hit the low point of their season after 
being swept at Wisconsin-Whitewater. Ohio 
University then outscored the lllini 1 3-1 and sent 
themhomewitha 1 3-9 record. The club responded 
with another seven-game winning streak before 
losing its momentum and the last three contests 
entering the Central States Collegiate Hockey 
League (CSCHL) tournament. 

An emotional 5-2 conquest of nemesis Iowa 
State in front of a packed Ice Arena propelled 
the lllini into the title game against Eastern 
Michigan. Although they fell short to the two- 
time defending champions, the lllini still earned 
a berth in the national tournament on the basis 
of their #6 ranking. 

North Dakota State dashed the Fighting lllini's 
quest for a national championship with a 4-2 
victory in the quarterfinals. The lllini bounced back 
from another loss to Ohio by gaining revenge 
against Michigan-Dearborn to claim fifth-place. 

"I think we improved steadily over the season," 
senior forward Emmett McCarthy said. "It would 
have been nice to have beaten either Ohio or 
North Dakota State at nationals, but we had some 
early letdowns." 

The lllini returned the core of their team this 
year. In its third year of playing together, the 
Orange line of McCarthy, Penn and junior Tom 
Radja carried the offensive load again. All three 
have earned a spot among the top 20 scorers in 
Fighting lllini history. 

"Lastyear, the Orange line led us all year long," 



Sports 



senior goalie Terry Kasdan said. 'This year as 
seniors, they've really done the job for us. Tom 
Radja is scoring like crazy." 

As was the case lastyear, the club depends on 
its senior leadership and experience. Kasdan, 
who already holds the league record for victories 
in a season, has been solid in the net for the lllini. 

"It always helps to have experience on your 
side," Kasdan said. "When it comes to the big 
games, playing in front of big crowds is something 
that you just have to get used to." 

Penn has bounced back from a season- 
ending injury and has picked up where he left 
off lastyear. He sees the offensive production of 
the Orange line as instrumental in the lllini's 
quest for a national crown. 

"We've worked on putting more pucks in the 
net to give our goalies some more support so that 
they don't have to face that many big shots," Penn 
said. "We have a lot of team unity and a good 
rookie class that's helping us out." 

Freshman Quinn Carlson played his way onto 
the first line before he was sidelined with an injury. 
6'5" defenseman Marc Zack earned a starting 
spot and sometimes in front of backup goalie 
Devin Huber, who is also in his first year with the. 
lllini and is an effective backup for Kasdan. 

The lllini have not parted ways with their 
streaky play. After starting 0-3, the club strung 
together six wins capped by an 8-3 rout of 
Minnesota and a sweep of Eastern Michigan. 
The club dropped three in a row, and headed 
into a showdown with Ohio at a packed Ice 
Arena, which sold out for every home game 
during this year's season. The weekend series 
sent the lllini into a mini-tailspin in which theyj 
dropped five straight games. 

Once again, the lllini picked themselves off the 
floor to string together four straight blowoutvictories 
entering the league tournament. However, the 
club met Eastern Michigan in the first round and, 
despite dominating play at both ends, they endec 
up dropping a 3-2 decision. 

Theclub prepared for the national finals because 
it maintained its #7 ranking into March. The lllin 
traveled to the University of Arizona for the final: 
in search of an elusive national championship. 

IHini hockey player Mark Zack 
checks a Penn State player at the L 
of I Ice Arena. 



Dan LaVallie skates up the ice 
against Towson State University. 
The lllini beat Towson tv/o times this 
season, 3-2 and 10-2. 

Illini hockey players Chad Cassel 
and Emmett McCarthy fight off a 
Penn State player at the U of I Ice 
Arena. 






Lacrosse 



Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Suk Ju Yun 



The lacrosse team would rather forget its 
disappointing finish to the 1 994 season. After 
an encouraging fall season that saw the laxmen 
post a 6-4 record, they fell to 2-7 in the spring. 
Coach Brian Mosher, a player on last year's 
squad, enters his first year in charge, optimistic 
that his team can rebound. Whether Mosher will 
be smiling at year's end will depend on how 
quickly a talented freshman class blends in with 
the established veterans. 

Inexperience plagued Illinois last year, 
especially at the attack and midfield positions. 
The team could not overcome this inexperience 
and was pounded by perennial Big Ten powers 
Michigan and Purdue. However, the laxmen 
rebounded and rode a stingy defense to a fifth- 
place finish in the Big Ten tournament. 

Defensively, the Fighting lllini were paced by 
junior John Alt and a trio of seniors. Don Drever, 
Jason Heiden and club president, Scott Williams, 
teamed up with Alt to provide the team with 
leadership and a stubborn defense that was the 
bright spot of last year's laxmen. Illinois will 
once again field a talented and reliable unit. 
Returnees include Alt, Drever and sophomore 
Jeremy Sullivan. Freshman Andy Perella showed 
promise during the fall season and will be 
expected to contribute right away. 

"Last year our defense was probably the most 
consistent part of our team," said Alt, this year's 
club president. "The defense anchored our team 
during games and kept us close by not allowing 
a lot of goals. This year, I think we have a better 
overall defense. We're legitimately six defense 
men deep, so that helps us run a steady rotation." 

Often the beneficiaries of the stellar play in 
front of them, senior goalies Ramiro Lopez and 
Rick Melton return. The fall performance of 
freshman Damon Patton presents Mosher with a 
pleasant problem. With three capable 



netminders, Mosher has the flexibility to switch 
goalies if the starter does not bring his top game 
out to the net with him. Patton has the potential 
to establish himself as the goalie of Illinois' 
future, and the seniors will ease this transition, 
according to Mosher. 

Senior Dave Neff returns to lead a deep 
midfield. After learning on the job last year, 
the midfield can now boast of several 
competitive lines to spell one another. 
Sophomore Mario Rodriguez and freshman 
Rick Hinsell will probably join Neff on the first 
line. The tentative lineup for the second line 
includes freshman Mark Garton and seniors 
Eric Bray and Paul Parasugo. 

With the departure of attack captain Doug 
Hart, incumbents Mike Maeder and Blake 
Rohrabaugh hope to spark a more potent offense 
and lessen the pressure placed on the defense. 
Upperclassmen Pete Giles and John McKinley 
give the attack even more experience, an 
intangible that was nowhere to be seen last year. 

"We didn't have too much experience, so we 
had to pull a lot together really quick. We got to 
play everybody because we didn't have too 
many guys suit up for road trips," Maeder 
explained. "This year, we should be looking 
pretty good. We hope to compete this spring as 
best we can." 

Mosher agreed with that assessment, saying, 
"We have an excellent freshman class. I expect 
them to do a lot for the team all year long. I think 
we're individually strong at all positions, but we 
have to come together as a team." 

Mosher added that the team hopes to finally 
knock off Michigan and Purdue and possibly 
earn a spot in the finals against Wisconsin. If the 
freshmen and the depth pay dividends early and 
often, Illinois just might be preparing for a 
showdown with the Badgers. 



I^PP** 



186 Sports 





n Illinois lacrosse team member 

catches the ball during a game in 

the Spring of 1994 at the Complex 

Fields. The team finished fifth in the 

Big Ten tournament last year. 




-Matl rimmons 



uring a game at the Complex 
Fields in the Fall of 7 994, a player 
tries to get by an opponent. Coach 
Brian Mosher hopes the team can 
rebound from a disappointing 1 993- 
94 season. 



Lacrosse 187 






Story by Toi Michelle Walker • Layout by Peggy Christensen 



When people go to those fabulous games 
here at the U of I, what are they looking forward 
to? Is it the players, the Chief, the intensity of 
competition or is it the GIRLS?! There is a whole 
lot more to these WOMEN than meets the eye! 

In order to be an lllinette, these women must 
go through some very rigorous auditions. Being 
a judge is not easy either because only 27-30 
dancers are chosen after a three day audition 
process. Hundreds of women audition each 
year. 

Once they make the team, they practice from 
4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Then, 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays, depending upon 
how badly they need it, they continue to practice 
until 8 p.m. During football season, they are 
expected at the stadium between seven and eight 
in the morning on game day, and they stay until 
the game is over late that afternoon. In addition, 
they perform at concerts, parades, camps and 
games like the Holiday Bowl or the Rose Bowl. To 
top everything off, the university does not fund 
the lllinettes programs. That means that these 
women pay for all of the uniforms and anything 
else they need all on their own. The average 
uniform costs between $200 and $250 a piece, 
not including shoes, and they need more than 
one uniform per season. 

Mary Albertson, junior in LAS and captain of 
the team said, "If I had it to do all over again, I 



would definitely do it. I have wanted to be an 
lllinette since forever, and now I stand in front of 
70,000 fans representing my university. It gives 
me chills every time." 

Because of the serious time commitment 
needed to be an lllinette, holding down a job is 
virtually impossible for these women. They make 
this commitment because they love their school 
and they love to dance. "There is no way we 
could accomplish what we do without incredibly 
talented and dedicated dancers and performers," 
said Leticia Dennis, third year team member. 
"This is truly a wonderful experience." 

"Being a part of the school and representing 
the university is an experience everyone definitely 
needs," said Melissa Foster, senior in LAS. "My 
sophomore year there were only two Black 
women on the squad. Many people don't realize 
that we are role models for a lot of women and 
little girls. This is my third year on the team and 
there are only two [Blacks]. When I look out at all 
of the little girls who want to be lllinettes when they 
grow up, I feel very proud to represent my culture. 
I want them to know that they can do this, too." 

Auditions are held at the end of a woman's 
freshmen year for the following season. It takes 
extreme dedication, and this year's lllinettes 
warn interested women not to do it if they are 
looking for outside appreciation. "We do this 
just because we love to dance." 



Illinette Emily Jobes, senior in LAS, 
performs her routine on the Quad 
during the pep rally on the night before 
the Homecoming game. The lllinettes 
perform at concerts, parades, camps 
and games like the Holiday Bowl or 
the Rose Bowl. 



lllinettes 189 





Women's Trac 



Story by Greg Lewickyi • Layout by Colleen Murray 



Posting second place finishes in both the 
indoor and outdoor Big Ten Championships 
last year, the women's track team once again 
proved itself to be one of the very best teams 
on campus. And having finished no lower 
than second in the conference since head 
Coach Gary Winckler arrived here ten years 
ago, the team certainly serves as an example 
of excellence and consistency. 

The team is also able to boast of seven 
members as being Ail-Americans. Senior Carmel 
Corbettwas recognized in the heptathlon, junior 
Dawn Riley in the 55-m hurdles, senior Hope 
Sanders in the 800-m and the 4x400-m relay, 
sophomore Nora Weber in the high jump, junior 
Tonya Williams in the 55-m and 400-m hurdles 
and the 4x400-m relay, along with Kathy 
Williams, who graduated in 1994, and junior 
Janelle Johnson in the 4x400-m relay. 

Considering all of this success, overcoming 
injuries that plagued the team early in their 
season and such surprise performances as Riley's 
in the triple jump, one could say it was an 

uring a Spring 7 994 Women's track 
meet, an Illinois team member 
participates in the long jump. Since 
head Coach Gary Winckler arrived at 
the U of I ten years ago, the team has 
finished no lower than second in the 
Big Ten conference. 



extremely successful year. And although they 
might have been slightly disappointed at the 
conclusion of last year at having not won the Big 
Ten, the team now looks upon last season as a 
great success. But do not expect the team to rest 
on its laurels. With the experience and confidence 
they gained, the team expects very good things 
to happen this year. "Last year was a big 
building year," said Corbett. "I think we are 
ready to step up nationally." 

Learning and gaining experience is something 
that Tonya Williams has been doing a lot of 
lately. During the summer she participated in the 
Senior Nationals in Tennessee and in the U. S. 
Olympic Festival in St. Louis, Mo., where she 
won the gold medal in the 400-m hurdles. "I 
have matured a great deal, and have learned 
not to let unnecessary things bother me," said 
Williams. She also stated that she learned a 
great deal from not only the other athletes 
involved, but from and about herself as well. 

Along with the experience gained and the 
(story continued on page 7 92) 





ports 





Ilinois Women's Track member 

Tama Tochihara shows her smooth 

stride. The Women's Track team placed 

second in both the indoor and outdoor 

Big Ten Championships. 

Ilinois sprinter Janelle Johnson 

shows her agony as she pulls ahead 

of her Tennessee opponent while racing 

in the Armory. Johnson was named an 

Ail-American in the 4x400-m relay. 



Women's Track 191 



(story continued from page 1 90) 
confidence built during last season, the team is 
also excited about the 1994-1995 season 
because of the incoming recruits. "A year ago 
a lot of people had to extend themselves to cover 
up our weaknesses," Coach Winckler said. But 
with the incoming recruits, Winckler does not 
expectto have the same problem. "They bring us 
as much balance as we have had in five years." 
With six returning All-Americans and a strong 
batch of recruits, the team again has its sights set 
on the Big Ten Championships, both indoor and 
outdoor. "I expect great things," said Corbett. 
"We are going to put up a fight in the Big Ten." 

Staying focused on their goals is something 
that the athletes and coaches alike are stressing. 
Williams thinks the team has a very good chance 
to win the Big Ten, but does not want the team to 
start getting ahead of itself. "We have got to 
focus on winning, but not before we get there. 
Instead of talking about it, we need to do it on the 
track," Williams said. 

The competition within the conference should 
be very tough. The team agrees that there are 
many strong teams, including perennial powers 
Wisconsin, Ohio State, Indiana and last year's 
winner, Michigan. Beating Michigan is something 
the athletes want to do, especially considering 
that the conference championships are being 
held in Michigan this year. 

The team feels it is ready for this year. "I think 
we are so much more prepared, both mentally 
and physically," said Corbett. And there is little 
doubt as to the abilities of the team. "If we do the 
job we are capable of doing, we have the talent 
to be very competitive," said Winckler. "And as 
long as you are in that top three group, you have 
got to believe you have a chance to win." 

They believe. 




armel Corbett is caught in mid- 
jump during a Spring 1994 women's 
track meet which . was held in the 
Armory. The team had six returning 
All-Americans this year. 



192 Sports 





MB! 

Standings 



Ul 




Opp. 


89 


Villanova 


28 


97 


Loyola 


21 


70 


Tennessee 


39 


70 


Rice 


49 


55 


Indiana 


61 


55 


Purdue 


35 


48 


Nebraska 


94.5 


48 


Arkansas 


64 


48 


Colorado St. 


12.5 


48 


Air Force 


4 


70 


Washington 


48 


70 


Kentucky 


22 


70 


Wisconsin 


18 


112 


Michigan 


141 


112 


Wisconsin 


56 


112 


Minnesota 


41 


112 


Iowa 


40 


112 


Purdue 


38 


112 


Michigan State 


21 


112 


Ohio State 


12 


112 


Penn State 


10 


15 


LSU 


48 


15 


UCLA 


15 



— Rick Widmer 



Women's Track 193 



Standings 



ui 

104 

68.5 

75 

76 

2nd 



Indoor 

EIU 

Nebraska 

Clemson 

Wisconsin 

Big Ten Championship 



Opp. 

31 

53.5 

66 

41 



1 5th NCAA Indoor Championship 

Outdoor 
53 Clemson Invitational 70 

1st lllini Classic 72 

58 Huskie Five-Team Meet 95 

2nd Big Ten Outdoor Championship 
21 st NCAA Outdoor Championship 




—Rick Widmer 

llinois' pole vaulter Daren Mc- 
Donough strains to clear the bar 

during a meet earlier this season. 

McDonough was the Big Ten 

champion in pole vaulting. 



!.94 Sports 





y^ 










Men's Trac 



Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Anna Nommensen 



Acollectionoforangeandbluechampionship 
banners streaming from the ceiling of the Armory 
provides a symbol of the track program's 
excellence. The 1 994 men's team added another 
chapter and another banner as Illinois claimed 
the Big Ten outdoor championship. 

From 1 987 to 1 989, the Fighting I II i mi swept 
six consecutive Big Ten championships. So after 
finishing as the bridesmaid to Ohio State 
University (OSU) in the indoor and outdoor Big 
Ten tournaments in 1 993, the lllini and Coach 
Gary Weineke were determined to overtake the 
Buckeyes. Though the team finished third in the 
indoor tournament to upstart Michigan and 
OSU, Illinois found itself in a familiar position at 
the conclusion of the outdoors, atop the Big Ten. 

Illinois' ascension can be attributed to some 
phenomenal individual performances turned in 
throughout the year. Under the direction of track 
legend Willie Williams, the sprinters proved that 
they were literally world-class athletes. The 4x400 
relay team of Dorian Green, Anthony Jones, Ben 
Beyers and Scott Turner eclipsed the Big Ten 
record by posting a time of 3:09.32 - good 
enough for a spot in the world rankings. The 
quartet ran to a fourth place finish at the NCAA 
championships later in the season. 

"We went into the 1 994 season knowing that 
we had some very strong potential athletes in the 
sprints in the persons of Anthony Jones, Scott 
Turner, Ben Beyers and freshmen Dorian Green 
and Charles Gibson," said Williams. 

Jones capped an illustrious collegiate career 
by being named the University Athlete of the 
Year and the Big Ten MVP for 1 994. He broke 
the school record in the 55-m dash and 200-m 
dash in addition to the Big Ten record in the 
100-m dash. Jones, an All-American after 
finishing fifth in the 55-m dash at the NCAA 
indoors, has returned to help Williams coach 
the sprinters this year. 

"We wi 1 1 sti 1 1 have a lot of Anthony' s leadersh i p 
out there to pass on to the other athletes. They are 
having a very strong fall practice and everything 
is falling into place," said Williams. "He will 
have a great influence on the team, as will Green 
and Beyers. Green leads by example. We had 

unior Jeff Teach throws the shot put 
at the Outdoor Track and Field 

Stadium. Teach won his third straight 

Big Ten title. 



lost Earl Jenkins, so we were looking for a person 
to come in and take his place, and Green 
stepped up." 

Green used the conference meets as a 
showcase for his considerable talents. He rose 
to the occasion in the 400-m dash, finishing 
second and third in the two meets. Beyers 
claimed the 400-m hurdle championship at the 
Big Ten outdoors. Both were instrumental parts 
of lllini relays. 

Coach John Baumann's field performers kept 
pace with the sprinters. Junior Jeff Teach won his 
third straight Big Ten title in the shot put. 
Sophomore Kyle Taylor's visible improvement in 
the discus translated into a fourth place finish at 
the Big Ten outdoors. 

Baumann looks for big things from triple 
jumpers Carl Myers and Bo Dailey. Myers has 
already reached the 50-m mark and Dailey is 
trying to catch up to Myers after an injury 
sidelined him all last year. 

Sophomore Daren McDonough, the Big Ten 
champion, and senior Steve Bridges formed a 
formidable duo of Illinois pole vaulters. Said 
Baumann, "Bridges was troubled with injuries 
and shoulder problems, but he came through for 
us in both conference meets. We look for good 
things out of Daren in this next year, both in the 
Big Ten and the nationals." 

Junior Marko Koers, a member of the 1 992 
Dutch Olympic team, was twice the national 
runner-up in the 800-m event. Koers won the 
800 and 1 500 meters as a sophomore and 
became the third lllini to win two national 
championships in one year. Senior transfer Chris 
Saunders joins Koers and senior Eric Henson to 
form an experienced trio of distance runners. 

"Our success is two-pronged," said Coach 
Weineke. "We have a tradition and a pride, 
and that carries us to a point. I've been fortunate 
to have excellent assistance. We feel that in a lot 
of instances, we simply outcoach other teams. " 

With a solid nucleus returning to defend the 
outdoor title, Illinois can use its tradition, pride 
and excellent coaching to hang yet another 
banner when the Big Ten indoor championships 
are held in the Armory in the spring of 1 995. 



Men's Track 195 











■t. 


IIP 

■■ 1 




¥3 Sfl 


Stan 


di 


n 


gs 


Ul 






Opp. 


9 


Illinois State 







5 


Western Michigan 




4 


7 


Drake 




2 ! 


9 


Wisconsin 







8 


San Diego 




1 


5 


San Diego State 




4 


7 


William & Mary 




2 i 


8 


Pepperdine 







6 


Notre Dame 




3 


9 


Penn State 




o ! 


5 


Michigan 




4 


9 


Northern Illinois 




o 


6 


Northwestern 




3 \ 


8 


Purdue 




1 


7 


Indiana 




2 


9 


Ohio State 




| 


8 


Minnesota 




1 


5 


Iowa 




4 ! 


8 


Michigan State 




1 


5 


Northwestern 




3 


5 


Minnesota 




1 


5 


Iowa 




2 ! 




jm amille Baldrich drills a backhand 
against a Michigan State 
opponent last Spring. The lllini 
defeated Michigan State 8-1. 

Kristi Meola returns a shot during 
a match at Atkins Tennis Center. 
Meola earned Big Ten honors while 
playing the number one singles 
position for the lllini in the Spring of 
1994. 



Sports 




I "' ■ is I 



§ 








d*a?f 


ii 





Women s Tennis 



Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Jennifer Chase 



There is an explanation for the women's tennis 
program's rapid rise to the top of the Big Ten 
conference and the national rankings. It is called 
the Roberts Reversal, and it works. 

Before Coach Jennifer Roberts returned to 
Illinois, Illinois was mired in the conference's 
lower division, a team that powerhouses like 
Indiana would consider an easy win. Those 
days are gone. 

Roberts used her experience as a player here 
in the 1 980s to light a fire under the Illinois 
program. Her aggressive approach has enabled 
players to truly reach their potential. 

"The emphasis of our program has been 
development," Roberts said. "If you watch the 
progress of the team over the years, we've helped 
the players perform at a higher level as they go 
through their years at Illinois." 

After enjoying their best season ever in 1 993, 
the lllini slipped to 1 3-9 overall and 6-4 in the Big 
Ten. However, the regular season record was not 
indicativeof the strides Illinois made under Roberts' 
direction. For instance, the team fulfilled one of its 
long-standing goals by finally knocking off Indiana. 
The Hoosiers, who have won ten of the twelve Big 
Ten championships, went on to claim yet another 
conference crown, but not before being humbled 
by the upstart lllini. 

Illinois stunned number nine Indiana by taking 
seven out of the nine matches in their regular 
season dual match. This domination made the 
victory the highlight of the season, especially for 
the juniors, who had been manhandled by Indiana 
in years past. 'That was one of our big goals. For 
the four juniors, it was more important to us 
because we had lost to them every year," junior 
Camille Baldrich said. "It was so exciting to finally beat 
them and realize that we're just as good as them." 

Baldrich led Illinois in victories after a solid 20- 
7season in the numberthree singles position. After 
a rough start, she won nine in a row going into the 
Big Ten meet and narrowly missed being named 
to the all-conference squad. 

Baldrich also teamed up with fellow junior 
Kristen Jones to form a formidable duo atop the 
Illinois doubles lineup. They compiled a sparkling 
21-2 mark in the Big Ten since 1992, and they 
enter the 1 994- 1 995 season with a ten match 
winning streak. They return as the top returning 
J doubles team in the Midwest region. 



Jones held her own in singles competition as 
well. The All-Big Ten selection finished 19-8 overall 
and 1 1 -2 in the conference from the number two 
spot in Roberts' lineup. Jones finished strong, 
winning 1 2 of 1 3 decisions to close out the season. 

Senior Kristie Meola, the player who did not 
return for the 1 994-1 995 season, managed to 
earn All-Big Ten honors while playing number 
one singles for the lllini. In her final season, 
Meola took on the nation's bestand still managed 
a 17-15 record. 

Roberts regularly fielded a lineup that 
consisted of four freshmen. Susanne Land, the 
team's MVP, Jessica Klapper, Jaclyn Batt and 
Laura Rydberg all made the adjustment to 
collegiate tennis a painless one. 

Unfortunately, Natalie Adsuar did not make 
the adjustment painlessly. Adsuar got off to a 
bad start when a knee injury sidelined her after 
three singles victories lastyear. In a year's time, 
Adsuar had completely recovered while the 
other freshmen gained valuable experience. All 
of which has Roberts looking forward to this 
year. "Although they had an average year, I 
saw a great deal of improvement out of the 
freshmen," Roberts said. "They are playing at a 
much higher level than lastyear and will make 
a significant contribution to this year's team." 

The added depth should enable Illinois to 
improve on its performance at the Big Ten 
Tournament this year. After losing a close 
decision to Northwestern in the opening round 
last year, the lllini bounced back, winning the 
rest of their matches to take fifth. The wins 
clinched Illinois' fourth straight upper-division 
finish in the conference. 

"We were a little disappointed, but we still 
finished higher than everyone expected us to," 
junior Lissa Kimmel said. "We only lost one 
player from lastyear. I expect us to improve and 
to finish higher in the Big Ten's." 

Since Roberts' arrival, she has met all but three 
of her goals. Winning the Big Ten, qualifying for 
the NCAA tournament and a top ten ranking have 
managed to elude her - so far. "The success of this 
year's team will depend on if they will be able to 
continue their progress and how they respond," 
Roberts said. "We will be a contender for the Big 
Ten title, and whether or not we can get it done 
remains to be seen. 



Women's Tennis 197 





Craig Tiley is a man on a mission. Tiley, the 
men's tennis coach, arrived at Illinois two years 
ago with an impressive background in the tennis 
world as a player, instructor, television analyst 
and coach. He has wasted no time in bringing the 
program into the national spotlight. 

After suffering through a 4-21 season in 1 993, 
Illinois jumped to 1 3-1 5lastyear. Even the improved 
record does not tell the whole story because Illinois 
had the dubious distinction of leading the nation 
by losing all eight of the team's 4-3 matches. In 
addition, the inexperienced lllini had match points 
in half of those heartbreaking setbacks. 

When Tiley became head coach in the spring 
of 1 993, his reputation helped him garner top 
recruits such as freshman Jerry Turek and transfers 
Chris DeVore and Jeremy Sutter. All three 
newcomers were instrumental in the turnaround of 
Illinois tennis. 

"My philosophy is simple - it's discipline and 
hard work," Tiley said. "We run a very disciplined 
and intense program. We have quite a few players 
that have goals to be professional tennis players." 

Turek came to Illinois with an impressive record 
in doubles competition. He was the two-time 
Canadian national champion and gold medalist 
of the Canadian Summer Games. Turek made the 
transition from British Columbia to Champaign a 
smooth one by compiling a 28-2 1 record from the 
number one singles position, earning him All-Big 
Ten honors, the team's MVP selection and the 
university's Male Newcomer of the Year award. 

The highlight of Turek's first year was his upset 
of Texas' Chad Clark, a former pupil of Tiley who 





Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Erin Evans 

had been ranked second nationally entering the 
match. Turek will enter the 1993-1994 season 
ranked fifth in the region, largely due to an attitude 
rarely exhibited by freshmen. 

"Since it was my first year, I didn't know what to 
expect," Turek said. "I didn't really put any pressure 
on myself to win because some of the guys I was 
playing were three or four years older than me." 

Sophomore Chris DeVore transferred to Illinois 
from South Carolina and, after being forced to sit 
out a year, seemed to strengthen as the season 
progressed. DeVore finished 26- 14 at the number 
two singles, including an impressive 1 0-4 mark in 
the conference. He won nine of his last 1 2 to end 
the season, and looks to carry that momentum into 
his junior season. 

Jeremy Sutter, who broke the single season 
victory mark by compiling a 29-15 record, 
displayed a knack for rising to the occasion 
against tough competition. The transfer student 
from Kansas was undefeated versus nationally- 
ranked opponents and won his last six matches of 
the year, helping him to Illinois' Most Improved 
Player award. 

"Sutter was one of our big impact players," 
Tiley said. "He beat the number one seed from 
Michigan in the Big Ten Championships in the first 
round. His game has improved tremendously." 

The lllini opened the Big Ten Championships 
with victories over Michigan State and Indiana 
before coming up short against host Minnesota. 
The nationally-ranked Golden Gophers went on to 
win the conference crown, butnot before struggling 
against upstart Illinois. 



Jerry Turek, a Canadian national 
champion, releases a powerful 
backhand. Turek was ranked fifth 
in the region following his fresh- 
man year. 





en's Tennis 



"We had a very young team. We gradually 
picked up experience and went to the Big Ten 
Championships and gave Minnesota a run for 
their money," Tiley said. "We played them the 
closest out of all the teams." 

This year's lllini will once again fall under the 
new and improved label. Last year's regulars have 
one more year of experience under their belts. 
Athletic junior Michau Basson and sophomore 
David Manpearl will give Tiley some added depth. 

"This year, we play more nationally ranked 
schools than last year, so it gives us an opportunity 
to see how far our program has come along," 
Turek said. "If we play well, itwill give us confidence 
going against the Big Ten teams." 

Turek and company are shooting to maintain a 
national ranking and break into the top three at the 
Big Ten meet this year. Standing in their way will 
be Minnesota, Michigan and Northwestern. 

To push Illinois past these teams, Tiley has 
brought in three freshmen with unbelievable 
credentials. Corbin Archer, Brady Blaine and 
Drew Parker were arguably the top players in , 
Utah, Michigan and Ohio respectively. All three 
are tournament-tested and veterans of junior tennis. 
In fact, Parker raised someeyebrowsata professional 
tournament last year when his serve was clocked at a 
blistering 1 33m.p.h.Toputthisspeedintoperspedive, 
no professional could even equal it. 

"He has one of the fastest serves in the game. 
That's his biggest weapon," Tiley said. "It's going 
to be exciting to watch that develop over the next 
four years." 

Tne same could be said for the U of I's program. 



x. 



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Ul Opp. 

5 Tulsa 

Kansas 5 

2 Notre Dame 5 
7 Bowling Green 
7 Cincinnati 

3 Ball State 4 

5 Miami, Ohio 2 
3 SMU 4 

2 Texas 5 

1 Texas Christian 6 

6 Purdue 1 

7 Marquette 
7 Southern Illinois 

3 Penn State 4 

2 Ohio State 5 
5 Indiana 2 
7 Illinois State 

3 Iowa 4 

Minnesota 7 
3 Michigan State 4 

1 Michigan 6 
3 Wisconsin 4 
3 Northwestern 4 

Big Ten Championships at 
Minneapolis, Minn. - 5th place 



ophomore transfer from South 

Carolina, Chris DeVore, returns a 

hot to his opponent. Chris finished v/ith 

i26-14 record in the #2 singles position. 



Men's Tennis 199 




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7 

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11 

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Michigan State 

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Wisconsin 

Iowa 

Michigan State 

Purdue 

Northwestern 

Wisconsin 



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11 
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10 
8 

10 
8 
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Wateflfloio 



Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Erin Evans 



Members of the men's water polo team would 
rather sweep the 1 993 season under the rug and 
forget about it. The 1 994 team has helped erase 
the previous year's disappointments with an 
impressive season. 

Lackluster performances on Illinois' three major 
road trips resulted in a frustrating .500 record entering 
the 1 993 Big Ten Championships. The squad returned 
from tournaments at Purdue, Northwestern and 
Wisconsin faced with the prospect of enduring the 
dreaded "rebuilding season." 

Illinois' showing at the Big Ten did little to dispel 
this notion. Led by the veterans Chris McDonough, 
Dan Israelite, Todd Luetkemeyer and James 
Kriegsmann, the team traveled to Ann Arbor, 
Mich., hoping to prove that their fourth seed was 
an oversight. However, Illinois suffered an early 
exit after three consecutive losses to Northwestern, 
Michigan State and nemesis Purdue. 

"Last year we did poorly and I don't think anyone 
will tell you differently," Israelite said. "Every year we 
have talented players, but we haven't used the talents 
correctly so that we win games. Sometimes we didn't 
have the guidance and sometimes we didn't think 
about what we' re doing. We losta lot of close games 
that we should have won." 

By adding California transfer Dwight Anderson 
and freshman Renato Tonelli to the equation, Illinois 
suffered some growing pains. The two newcomers 
were forced to adjustto the new program while seeing 
significant playing time in their rookie seasons. 

"A lot of players that started last year were 
young and inexperienced," Tonelli said. "It was a 
frustrating season with a disappointing ending. 
We had higher expectations, butyoutrytotakethe 
losses and learn from them." 

Israelite noted that Illinois started a lineup that had 
very little teamwork experience, a weakness which 
was continually exploited by opponents throughout 
the season. The lack of cohesion inthe pool hurtlllinois 
most in Ann Arbor. 

"As the season goes on, the games get more 
physical and the level of play rises," Israelite said. 
"We just weren't prepared well enough for that." 

With one more year of playing together under 
their belts, the five returning starters were determined 
to win and win now. An early season trip to Purdue 
turned out to be justwhat Illinois needed. Opening the 
tournament with a loss to top-ranked Purdue did not 
phase Illinois as they rebounded to exact some 
revenge upon Michigan State for lastyear's bitter loss 
at the Big Ten's. "All of those games at Purdue were 
pretty close," Tonelli said. 'That's the firsttournament, 



so you can expect that to happen." 

If the Purdue toumamentwasa source of optimism, 
the Northwestern tournament was full-fledged proof 
that Illinois was no longer a doormat for Big Ten water 
polo. After opening with another loss to talented 
Purdue, it looked like more of the same for Illinois. 
However, the team used the defeat as a springboard, 
stringing together four straight wins to close out the 
tournament. Included in the streak was a long- 
awaited victory against intrastate rival Northwestern 
University in Evanston. 

In the last tune-up before the return to Evanston for 
the Big Ten meet, Illinois made the trip to Wisconsin 
with some unfinished business thatwould notwait any 
longer. The team shocked a pesky Purdue squad in a 
thrilling 10-9 upset of the Boilermakers. Illinois 
continued its winning ways by knocking off 
Northwestern and Wisconsin. 

Heading into the Big Ten Championships, Illinois 
has reason to believe that this year will be a different 
story. The veterans know what is necessary for the 
team to continue the turnaround. "From last year to 
this year, the team grew a lot," McDonough said.] 
'Thisyear, through practices and tournaments, we've 
started to boost our confidence. I think we know by 
now what the level of play will be. At the Big Ten's, ifs 
a little different. Teams are up for it." 

Once again, the Big Ten boasts of several 
rugged opponents that are capable of leaving 
Evanston with the conference crown in hand. With 
momentum on its side, Illinois is seeded second 
and will have to win two of three games in its 
bracket to become one of the final four teams. 

In its path are conquerable teams in Ohio State 
and Wisconsin. Illinois will finish pool play with a 
showdown againstanakvaystoughMichigan squad. 
However, Illinois' biggest concern is its own 
performance. 

"Renatoand Dwightare big factors in our success, 
particularly offensively," McDonough said. "We rely 
on them more than we did in the past to generate a 
lot of the offense and to basically play off each other." 

Additionally, if Illinois wishes to advance to the 
round of four, it will need to avoid turnovers and ill- 
advised passes. Illinois will look for standout 
performances from freshman goalie, Justin Schultz, 
and club president, Mike Kennedy. 

"A large portion of our success thisyear came from 
realizing what didn't work in the past and how we 
should change our offensive and defensive strategies 
to better facilitate the strengths of our team," Israelite 
said. "If we make other teams play according to how 
we want to play, we should do well." 



200 Sports 





ophomore Joe Zopf looks to 
pass the ball during a 
tournament at Northwestern 
University. Illinois was victorious 
in its match over longtime interstate 
rival Northwestern. 

thris McDonough, graduate 
student, tries to stop a foe 
during a tournament last fall. 
McDonough stated f "This year, 
through practices and tournaments, 
we've started to boost our 
confidence." 



— Claudette Roulo 





















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-Claudette Roulc 



Water Polo 201 



ophomore Jillian Randall dives into the wafer 

just as senior Sharon Planner touches the wall. The 

team is ready to establish the swimming program at 

Illinois as being competitive in the conference. 




202 Sports 



I 





I 





wimming 



Story by Greg Lewickyi • Layout by Colleen Murray 



No team on campus has changed more than 
the swimming team has in the pastyear. Entering 
his second year as head at Illinois, Jim Lutz has 
brought about an almost complete overhaul of 
personnel. The changes started with the coaching 
staff and the addition of diving coach Ronda 
Kaletz, something that the team has lacked as a 
separate position in the past. More astounding is 
[he number and the talent of the incoming 
swimmers, a group that includes 1 8 freshman 
and one transfer. This means that 1 9 of the 26 
current members of the team are new to the team 
his year. 

With this new blood the team hopes to turn 
around the swimming program and start to 
aecorme more competitive in the Big Ten. The 
earn finished tenth in the conference last year 
and has finished near the bottom for the last 
several years. Despite this ranking, the team was 
not at all disappointed with last season, in fact, 
hey felt it was quite successful. "The fact that we 
nad 53 lifetime bests and 87 in season best 
means that percentage-wise, we had a great 
season," said Lutz. He also pointed out that the 
earn broke three school records as well. Senior 
:o-captain Marni Tobin added that the lllini has 
■ar fewer women competing that most of the 
ather schools they faced. "Last year we held our 
awn againstteamswith twiceas many women as 
js," said Tobin. 

With their new found talent and team depth, 
he team fully expects to improve upon its 
aerformance. "With a full line-up, people will be 
able to swim their events and not have to swim as 
aften, leaving them with more energy for those 
3vents," said sophomore Debbie Schwartz. On 




paper the team has the potential to finish a 
possible fifth or six in the Big Ten, and should 
definitely improve a great deal in its score 
regardless of ranking. Lutz pointed out that luck 
plays a role in the rankings and was also aware 
of the talent level of their opponents. Defending 
champion Michigan is once again the team to 
beat, with teams like Northwestern, Ohio State 
and Michigan State also being highly talented. 

One of the concerns for this team will be its 
youth. Although many of the freshman have 
competed at the national level, the competition 
within the conference will be unlike anything 
they have seen before. "You don't know how a 
freshman is going to compete in the Big Ten," 
said Lutz. "The competition is as pressure packed 
as anything in the country." The swimmers seem 
to be aware of this difference and are prepared 
to do their part. "It will be a big adjustment being 
in the Big Ten," said freshman Sarah Hackler. "I 
just want to score points where I can." 

The team is very excited about the 1 994- 
1 995 season and is ready to establish the 
swimming program at Illinois as being competitive 
in the conference. They are also eager to show 
that they are worthy of support from the student 
body by being successful and hard working. "I 
believe out team will succeed this year, and that 
does not mean we will have a certain number of 
wins or a certain ranking," said freshman Lindy 
Mercer, showing the kind of maturity and attitude 
that Lutz hopes his team can possess throughout 
the upcoming seasons. With their youth and 
energy this team will turn heads, and with its 
talent and maturity it will keep those heads 
turned for years to come. 

reshman Sarah Hackler 
swims the breast stroke. 
Nineteenof the 26 current 
members are nev/ to 
Illinois' swimming team 
this year. 





1111 Mk pill 

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Standings 


Ul 




Opp. 


67 


Wisconsin 


172 


87 


Penn State 


186 


74 


Iowa 


223 S 


72 


Southern Illinois 96 


62 


Illinois State 


86 


73 


Missouri 


93 1 


171 


Michigan State 1 28 


142 


Iowa State 


114 


47 


Shippenburg State 37 


83 


Northwestern 


142 i 


95 


Ohio State 


140 


285.50 


Iowa 


285.50 


285.50 


Illinois State 


239 


119 


Minnesota 


137 


90.50 


Michigan 


693.50 | 


90.50 


Northwestern 


553.50 


90.50 


Ohio State 


440 i 


! 90.50 


Penn State 


388 ! 


90.50 


Wisconsin 


385.50 


90.50 


Minnesota 


379 


90.50 


Purdue 


360 


90.50 


Indiana 


165 



-Doug Filipov 



Swimming 203 







Women's Soccer 



Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Suk Ju Yun 



Earning its fourth straight trip to the National 
Collegiate Club Soccer Association's competition 
in Phoenix, Ariz., the women's soccer team has 
proven themselves to be one of the more 
competitive teams on campus. In a season where 
the team had its ups and downs, they have 
proven able to pull together after some difficult 
defeats and to play with a renewed sense of their 
goal: to reach Nationals. 

Despite this being their fourth consecutive trip 
to Nationals, the faces on the team have changed 
quite a bit, especially over the past year. "Some 
of the positions were up in the air after last year, 
but with some changing of positions and with the 
additions made to the team we have been able 
to be very successful," said senior co-captain 
Christie Cochran. 

Team depth has been one of the reasons that 
this team has accomplished as much as it has. 
With the number of highly talented players the 
team has, it is very confident with whatever 
combination of players that are on the field. The 
skill level of the younger players has been a 
pleasant surprise and a key to the team's success. 

"This is the most talented team that I have 



played with," said senior co-captain Jennifer 
Bates. Bates is the only member of the team 
playing in her fourth year with the team. 

One area in which the team feels that it has 
improved upon last year is in its passing and 
finishing, both dependent upon 
communication. "Soccer comes down to 
communication, and we are doing it better 
than we have in the past," said Cochran. 

A major reason for this improvement was the 
two a day practices that the team had for the first 
three weeks of the season. With a morning 
practice for conditioning and an afternoon 
practice concentrating more on skill and 
teamwork the team felt like it was much more 
prepared for the season than its opponents. "We 
can all tell what a big difference it has made in 
our endurance," said junior Paula Minor, adding, 
"everybody wants to do this, we all have the 
desire to work hard in order to win." 

Another area in which the heavy practicing 
helped the team was in its confidence. By knowing 
that they were in great shape for the season, and 
from being proud because of their dedicated 
work ethic the team was extremely confident 



hristie Cochran, a senior sweeper, 

holds off an opponent in the Mini's 

pursuit of victory. Cochran, the team's 

co-captain, hopes to lead the team to 

Nationals for the fifth consecutive year. 



heading into the season. This was especially 
helpful for the younger players on the team. The 
hard work put fourth in practices meant the team 
felt an extra incentive to play hard in matches; if 
they were going to work that hard, it was going 
to pay off. "We started the season with some 
lofty goals, and since day one this has been a 
very dedicated group," said Bates. 

The camaraderie of the team is also something 
special. "The girls are more supportive of each 
other, like a big family," said Cochran in 
comparing with past teams. 

This support started in providing the incentives 
to work hard in practice and has been their* 
throughout the season, helping the team bounce 
back from even the most disappointing losses. 
Support from fans has also been a big part of the 
season for the team, especially the large numbers j 
of parents that come out and see the games. 

Having gone to Nationals the last four 
years and having lost in the semifinals the last 
two years to the eventual champions, the team 
really wants to make this year different. "We 
want to take it one next step and win 
Nationals," said Bates. 



204 Sports 





hris Marty, a junior right mid- 
fielder, controls the ball during a 
natch on the complex fields last 
all. The team practiced twice daily 
n an effort to improve performance 
md teamwork. 



Women's Soccer 205 



1 














Standings 


Ul 


Opp. 


1 Northwestern ! 


12 II 


inois Central 


1 3 Eastern Illinois 1 


2 


Indiana 


3 


Purdue 2 


3 


Michigan 3 


3 ) 


^lotre Dame 


1 Sa 


ngamon State 4 


1 


Rosary 2 


4 


Dayton 1 


4 


Ohio 


3 


Miami 1 


4 


Ohio 1 


4 Bowling Green 


4 r 


^lotre Dame 1 


3 


Ball State 


2 


Purdue 


3 


Michigan 3 


3 


Ball State 


3 


Indiana 


1 


Miami 


5 


Toledo 


2 


Ohio State 1 


3 Weber State 3 


2 


Auburn 


5 


Kansas 





Fexas A&M 1 





206 Sports 



forward Bora Esenler dribbles the 
ball down the field. The men's soccer 
team made it to the National 
quarterfinals in 1 994, before losing to 
Texas A&M. 






Soccer 



Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Erin Evans 



— Darren King 

ream forward Brian Deters jumps for 
a header against his opponent. Last 
eason, the men's soccer team won the 
tig Ten championship and advanced 
o the six-team regional. 



The clock could not seem to tick fast enough 
for the men's soccer club. Illinois was clinging to 
a 3-2 lead against Weber State, and with under 
a minute left in their opening matchup at the 
national finals in Phoenix, eventual runner- 
upWeber State scored and escaped with a tie. 

In many ways, this heartbreaker parallels 
Illinois' quest for an elusive national title. Illinois 
has long been considered one of the elite club 
teams in the nation and is a regular at nationals, 
yet the players are still searching for that missing 
ingredient to put them over the top. 

"We felt we could have gone further," said 
junior forward Brad Weilbacher. "Weber State 
ended up tying us in the last 30 seconds, so we 
were pretty competitive last year." 

After dominating opponents in the regular 
season last year, Illinois headed into the 
postseason with a 1 5-2-3 record and reason to 
believe that this was finally their year. Illinois 
assembled a talent-laden squad that tied 
Northwestern, a Division One rival, and claimed 
the Bowling Green and Michigan tournaments. 

The club won the Big Ten championship and 
advanced to the six-team regional, which Illinois 
claimed by edging out Ohio State in the 
championsip game 2-1 . 

With the regional championship, Illinois 
sewed up a trip to Phoenix and the national 
finals. The players shrugged off the 
disappointment of the tie against Weber State to 
post shutout wins over Auburn and Kansas. 

Those two wins pitted Illinois against Texas 
A&M in the quarterfinals. Neither team dented 
the net in regulation, so the game went to an 
overtime shootout. The Aggies ended the club's 
dream of a national title by edging Illinois in the 
shootout 1 -0. 

"I think that last year we didn't quite live up 
to expectations," seniorMarkEriksonsaid. "We 
wanted to win nationals, and I think we had the 
talent to do it. Unfortunately, it just didn't 
happen." 

Captains Steve Gehard and Phil Imm provided 
senior leadership last season, a quality that the 
1994-1995 team is thin on. Illinois' only true 
seniors, forward Brian Deters and defenseman 
Jim Becker, will combine with fifth-year seniors 
Jason Ruge and Erikson to fill the void. 



"That's the one spot this year where we are 
the weakest," stated Weilbacher, the 1 995 club 
president. "Some of the other teams in the 
league have more experience than us, but the 
new guys we picked up are all quality players. 
It will just be a matter of them getting used to 
playing at this level." 

An experienced defense will be the backbone 
of the club. Becker and sophomore Andy Stump 
will spearhead a stingy defense in frontof freshman 
goalkeeper Chad Dennem. Stump had impressed 
in his first year of collegiate soccer before being 
slowed by a hamstring injury. 

"Our defense is pretty strong, especially up 
the middle," Erikson said. "We have a lot of 
guys that have played there for the last three 
years. They know what they're doing." 

Offensively, Illinois will field a potent lineup 
capable of steamrolling opponents as it did last 
year by twice scoring over ten goals in a game. 
Center midfielders Ruge and sophomore Craig 
Wunderlich team up with forwards Deter, 
Weilbacher and transfer Bora Esenler to form 
an effective attack. 

"Our defense is very strong, and when they 
win the ball, they get it up to us and we finish," 
Weilbacher said. "It's a good combination 
and it is working out really well. We will score 
a lot of goals." 

Despite the trouble spots, Illinois will once 
again aim for the national crown. To win it all, 
the club will have to gel sometime before 
regionals. 

"The talent is there to get back to Phoenix," 
Deters said. "We need to get a distinct style of 
play that all championship teams have. We 
haven't established it yet, but once we find it, 
we'll be okay. It's going to take a little longer 
because of the new faces." 

Weilbacher shares those high hopes with 
Deters. If Illinois can hit stride in the postseason, 
the flight back from Phoenix could be one to 
remember. 

"I think it's realistic," Weilbacher said. 
"The biggest thing for us is going to be keeping 
our heads on right. We've got the quality 
players to do it. We've had spots so far where 
I don't think there is anyone that can beat us 
if we play like that." 



Men's Soccer 207 



• • . •• -• 



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Women's Golf 



Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Poom Nukulkij 



Having finished third in the Big Ten each of the 
last three years, and having three of the last four 
individual champions of the conference, the 
women's golf team is no stranger to success. 
Being selected to go to Regional competition with 
a chance to then proceed to Nationals has 
proved to be elusive. Making their decision 
before the Big Ten Championships in Spring of 
1 994, the selection committee chose Minnesota 
over Illinois for the fourth and final position in the 
region. This was particularly disappointing to 
the team because at the Big Ten Tournament, 
Illinois finished 1 7 strokes ahead of Minnesota. 

The team is not wallowing in self pity. Instead 
they are focused and determined to work toward 
a Regional selection in the Spring of 1 995. "I've 
noticed a definite change in attitude of the team, 
a very dynamic change," said head Coach 
Paula Smith. "The team has been practicing hard 
because they have a team goal. They see what is 
possible and they know what to do to get there." 

And if the fall season is any indication of the 
team's potential, they are certainly on their way 
to getting there. Winning their first tournament of 
the fall was a big boost for the team, showing 
them what they are capable of doing. They have 
also finished second, fourth and eighth in their 
other fall tournaments. The eighth place finish 
was against some of the top competition in the 
country. Five of the seven teams that finished 
ahead of the lllini were at Nationals last years, 
and ninth place finisher Florida was ranked 
fourth in the country going into the tournament. 
To place this well against such tough 
competition will be a good spring board into 
the spring season. 

One of the reasons for this year's success is the 
team depth. With an excellent group returning 
from last year and some outstanding recruits, 
Coach Smith believes she has as much talent as she 
has had in a long time. Smith said, "More people 
are capable of breaking into the line-up this year 
and of contributing to the team's success." 

Freshman Karen Kamazin has been a big 
reason for this year's efforts. Starting off her 



college career by tying for first place overall 
showed that she is more than ready for the 
competition at this level. "My main goal coming 
in was to travel with the team," said Karnazin. "I 
have met those expectations and exceeded them." 
Despite being a freshman, she has plenty of 
experience playing golf. She started to play 
when she was eight years old and has played as 
much as possible in the last ten years. Karnazin 
was on her high school varsity team for all of her 
four years and ended her career by finishing 
second at the Illinois High School Association 
girls tournament last year. 

Along with the younger golfers, there is a 
great core of experienced players. With three 
seniors there are plenty of people to look to for 
experience, but none has more than senior 
captain Becky Biehl. As it is her fourth year on 
the team, she brings a wealth of tournament 
experience with her, including her experience at 
Nationals last year in Portland, Ore. At that 
tournament she learned not to give up. If she had 
a bad hole in the past it would affect her 
concentration for the next. Biehl said things are 
different now. "If you have a bad hole, forget it 
and take each shot one at a time and each hole 
one shot at a time." Biehl was happy about the 
opportunity to go to Nationals and is looking 
forward to going again this year. "It was a great 
experience on a great course with great players." 

After an off-season that will include 
conditioning and other preparation, the team is 
looking forward to the spring season. Although 
the competition in the Big Ten is excellent from 
top to bottom, the team believes in its own 
abilities. "We have an abundance of talent," 
said Biehl. "We need to come out with an attitude 
that we can win and reach a little deeper and 
work a little harder to reach our goals." 

"I'm excited to see everyone really wanting to 
go to Regionals, and working hard at it," said 
Smith. With their combination of talent, 
experience and desire the team expects great 
things from themselves. "I knowwecandoitifwe 
just put it all together," Karnazin said. 











*. 


/ * 


• 


» 


* 

« 




I 


w • 




* 


1 


:■. ■ 







ecky Biehl blasts out of the bunker 

at the Illinois Spring Classic held 

in Savoy. Biehl has been on the team 

for four years and is also the captain. 



208 Sports 






'/ 

/ % 




§*», 




Tournament Place 

Spring 1 994 

NIL) Snowbird Intercollegiate 2nd 

Wahine Rainbow Invitational 6th 

Lady Buckeye Invitational 6th 

Boilermaker Invitational 3rd 

Mini Spring Invitational 1 st 

Big Ten Championship 3rd 

Fall 1 994 

Illinois State Invitational 1 st 

Michigan State Invitational 2nd 

Lady Northern Intercollegiate 4th 

Lady Kat Invitational 8th 




il 



ophomore Jacqueline Rubin 
watches her shot roll across the 
green during a putt. The team is 
working toward its goal of 
participating in Regional competition 
in the Spring. 



Women's Golf 209 



la ■ 





Men's Golf 



Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Anna Nommensen 



Despite having a very good fall season 
last year, the men's golf team was a little 
disappointed by their season on the whole. 
"It was a fair year," said head coach Ed 
Beard. "We had some good and we had 
some bad." One of the good things to come 
from last year was the selection of Jamie 
Fairbanks for the All Big Ten for his third 
straight year. 

This year's team has been trying to 
replace the loss of Fairbanks since he 
graduated. The team, however, is not 
worried about the talent level of its golfers. 
"We have got a lot of talent and experience," 
said senior Ryan Graff who redshirted last 
year. Coach Beard agrees. "We are a pretty 
good team, we have good chemistry and a 
strong work ethic. We still need to do a little 
work, but we'll certainly be competitive." 

The team has been playing well this 
season, opening with fifth and ninth place 
finishes in their first two tournaments. The 
team is not very satisfied with their play in 
these early tournaments, however, noting 
their inconsistent scores. The pattern for the 
team is to play very well in the first two 
rounds and then fall off a little in the third 
when other teams turn it up a notch. Graff 
said of the team, "We haven't played up to 
our potential so far." 

And potential they have. Sophomore 
Brian Atkinson won the Michigan Amateur 
Championships this past June of 1994, and 
played in the U. S. Amateur Championships 
in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., in August. "I've 
learned, this year, where the weaknesses in 
my game are and I have seen what it takes 
to win," said Atkinson. 

Graff also showed his talent this summer 
in the National Collegiate Players 



Tournamentand its Championship in Dallas, 
Texas, where he tied for second place. 
"Doing so well gave me some confidence," 
said Graff. "It let me know that I can play at 
the college level and be very competitive." 

With this kind of talent and experience it 
is obvious that the team has very good 
potential, and the golfers hope that this will 
turn into an invitation to Regionals in the 
spring of 1995 with a shot at Nationals. 
The team agrees that they need to improve, 
especially in their mental preparation and 
approach to the game. "We need to set our 
expectations higher," Atkinson said. "As a 
team we need to focus more on getting a 
lower score on the board instead of worrying 
about putting a high one on it." Graff noted 
during the fall season thatthey were playing 
without direction and it was hurting the 
team. "It is just a matter of getting our 
mental games straightened out," said Graff. 
"We need to get some motivation and set 
some goals." 

In terms of the Big Ten, the team feels it 
is definitely competitive. "We have the 
experience, and we were competitive 
against these guys all summer long," said 
Atkinson. The Big Ten looks to be very 
strong this year. Wisconsin, the winner the 
last two years, should have a strong team 
along with Minnesota, Northwestern and 
Ohio State. Coach Beard said, "We can 
play very well and finish near the bottom." 

"We need to come out in the spring and 
beat some teams early," said Graff. The 
team has the talent, and coupled with a 
little bit of success the potential of this team 
will come to show itself. "Confidence as a 
team is important," said Atkinson. "Once 
we get that, everything will fall into place." 

enior Karl Plattner swings at the 
ball with his iron. Mental prep- 
aration and concentration are areas 
which the team has strived to improve. 




210 Sports 



M 





' «/• 






Tournament Place 

Spring 1 994 

Florida Southern Invitational 1 2th 

Sheraton Emerald/ East Carolina 7th 

Dr. Pepper Intercollegiate 3rd 

Marshall Invitational 7th 

Legends of Indiana 9th 

Hawkeye Invitational 3rd 

Kepler Invitational 1 Oth 

Big Ten Championship 8th 

Fall 1 994 

Falcon Invitational 5th 

Northern Intercollegiate 9th 

Nike Northwest Invitational 

PGA Invitational 




1! 



(, 



enior Dave Cable prepares to putt. 

The golf team hopes to be a com- 
petitive force in this year's Big Ten 
competition. 



Men's Golf 211 





Cheerleading 



Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Ryan Almon 



"We try to do things to keep the fans 
involved in the game," said senior co-captain 
Doug Shein of the U of I cheerleading team. 
"We are not there as a side show." 

The U of I cheerleading team is a far cry 
from a mere sideshow. It is a group of 1 6 - 
eight men and eight women - who are 
recognized as a team and not as an 
organization. They put in as much dedication 
and hard work as any of the athletic teams on 
campus. They also have one of the longest 
seasons of any team on campus. They practice 
about five times a week, and performances 
take place from August through May. Factor 
in that the cheerleading team does not receive 
athletic scholarships and that they are required 
to fulfill all academic requirements. It is easy 
to see how dedicated these individuals are to 
their sport. 

Because of the amount of dedication and 
work that must be put forth by all of the 
cheerleaders, another characteristic that jumps 
out at you is self-motivation. Without some of 
the incentives that other sports team members 
receive, one would think it difficult to strive for 
the teamwork and the perfection of execution 
that they do. 

"Our motivation comes from the pride in 
what we do," said Jennifer Horton, also a 
senior co-captain. "None of us want to look 
bad in front of a crowd." 

Many people are probably unaware of the 
national competition that the team is involved 
in every year. In fact, over the last seven years 
the team has finished among the top ten in the 
country five times. How many of our other 
teams can boast of accomplishments like this? 
The competition is the Universal Cheerlead- 
ing Association's College National 



Championships which is held in San Diego 
and can be seen on ESPN. 

In order to qualify for the nationals, the 
team puts together a videotape of its 
performances in front of crowds throughout 
the year, including football and men's and 
women' basketball games. The final tape will 
be about six to eight minutes long and must 
show the team's ability to lead a cheer, perform 
various skills and generally show 
synchronization and sharpness as a unit. This 
year's team expects to go to nationals and 
hopes to perform very well. 

"I would like to see us walk away with a 
routine that we are proud of and one that 
outdoes our previous performance [of a tenth 
place finish]," said Horton. 

So why are these athletes involved? Most of 
them were high school athletes and look to 
cheerleading as a way to stay involved in 
sports. The backgrounds of the team members 
range from gymnastics to track and from 
football to basketball. Some of the women 
also were involved with cheerleading in high 
school. It is here that we must not forget that 
the men must overcome many stereotypes 
when they become cheerleaders, butthis seems 
not to be a big factor for many of them. 

Another reason these athletes are involved 
is simply for the enjoyment. "It is a lot of fun," 
said Shein. "The people I have met and the 
places I have seen are things that I would not 
otherwise have been exposed to had I not 
been part of the team." 

"Our first priority is to support the teams we 
cheer for and to make the events as exciting as 
we can for the fans," said head coach Erin 
Krouse. That is exactly what they do. Let us 
give them credit where credit is due. 

uring a men's basketball game, 
Tim Peters, v/ith the help of Doug 
Sawyer on his shoulders, suspends 
Jen Horton and Yogie Jacala in the air. 
The cheerleading team practices hard 
in the hopes of earning a spot in the 
annual Universal Cheerleading 
Association's College National 
Championships which is held in San 
Diego and can be seen on ESPN. 




212 Sports 





hristian Bryant raises Angle Soer 
high in the air during halftime of 
an lllinios men's basketball game. 
Over the last seven years the team 
has finished as one of the country's 
top ten collegiate cheerleading 
squads five times. 



Cheerleading 213 







n Illinois cross-country team 
member nears the finish line at a 
competition during the year. After 
failing to finish in the Big Ten's 
upper division for the first time in 
twenty years, the Fighting lllini 
runners bounced back to fourth 
place this year. 





Men's Cross-Country 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Anna Nommensen 



Veteran coach Gary Weinecke's cross- 
country team found itself in unfamiliar 
waters in 1 993 and decided to do something 
about it this year. After failing to finish in 
the Big Ten's upper division for the first time 
in twenty years, the Fighting lllini runners 
bounced back to fourth place this year. 
Illinois' return capped a season of marked 
improvement despite the absence of two 
key performers. 

"We were in a rebuilding part of the 
program," Weinecke said. "Distance running 
is a developmental process and that is simply 
where we were at that point." 

Weinecke's squad entered the fall without 
injured track star Marko Koers, which created 
a large gap in the lineup considering Koers is 
a two-time All-American and Dutch Olympian 
in long distance running. Also missing was 
senior Dan Mazur, Illinois' top returning 
finisher in the NCAA District IV meet. 

The lllini welcomed transfer Chris 
Saunders aboard. Saunders was coming 
off a Division II All-American season for 
South Dakota-Vermillion and carried that 
success to the next level. Saunders ran 
consistently in the third spot of the lineup 
and helped the lllini to a fourth place finish 
at the District IV meet this year, a significant 
improvement on 1 993' s twelfth place finish. 

"The year before was kind of a disgrace," 
junior Eric Henson said. "We felt like we let 
the university down and were embarrassed 
that we were the team that it happened to." 

Henson and senior David Eckburg used 
that motivation to provide the lllini with a 
formidable 1-2 punch at the top of 
Weinecke's lineup. Together, they joined 
Saunders in leading the team's turnaround, 
an intangible that did not go unnoticed. 

"Basically, a cross-country team is only 
as good as its internal leadership," 
Weinecke said. "Eckburg, Saunders and 
Henson led by example. The leadership of 
those three really changed the overall 
attitude and was one of the major factors 
for our turnaround." 

Promising sophomore Joe Alexander 
solidified the Illinois lineup. After walking on 



the team a year ago, Alexander went on 
score in the first five meets and never looke 
back, earning the 1 993 Best Newcomer of th 
Year award in the process. According t 
Weinecke, Alexander "ran very well an: 
embedded himself in the top five." 

"We came into the season in better shap 
and with another year of running behin 
us," Henson said. "The underclassmen di 
a good job of coming in prepared." 

The added preparation came to fruitio 
on Oct. 1 5 when Illinois captured the title c 
the Auburn Invitational. Weinecke believe 
that the win signalled the completion c| 
Illinois' turnaround. "When we went t 
Auburn, we had five guys come swoopin' 
in there in an eleven second spread, 
Weinecke said. "When you race over fiv 
miles and you finish within eleven second 
of each other, that's not very far. That wa 
an impressive sight. That's probably thl 
place where they really started believing 
that they were on the right track." 

After improving four places to fourth at th 
Big Ten meet, the lllini travelled to the Distrk 
IV meet at Purdue in hopes of earning a trip t 
the NCAA Championships. The absence d 
Koers and Mazur finally caught up with lllinoii 
as they finished fourth, just seven points fror ! 
advancing to the Nationals. 

"It was a little disappointing finishint 
seven points shy from the Nationals, 
Henson said. "But it was an excellent seasoi 
both for the team and individually." 

Indeed, each lllini runner broke hi 
personal record this season. Despite th< ; 
losses of Eckburg and Saunders, Koers anc 
Mazur will return nextyear intenton helpinc 
the lllini maintain their tradition in cross 
country established in 28 years unde 
Weinecke. If juniors Barry Pearman anc 
Mike Smaidris or sophomore Jason Zierei 
step up, Illinois should be very competitive 

"There's no question that this year wf 
were much more consistent," Weinecke said 
"The hard part will be replacing the, 
leadership, but these guys are seasonec 
and experienced." 

Do not bet against them. 



214 Sports 







wo Illinois cross-country team 

members lead the pack during 

a meet last fall. The lllini were just 

seven points away from advancing 

to the Nationals. 



Mens Cross-Country 215 




ari Karubas dances to the music 

during her floor exercise routine 

at the mixed pairs exhibition. This 

year's Big Ten Championships were 

held at the U of I in Huff Hall. 





Women's Gymnastic: 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Anna Nommensen 



216 Sports 



Lynn Crane knows the pressures that her 
girls face as collegiate gymnasts. She came to 
Illinois last year after coaching Florida to a 
tenth-place finish nationally two years ago. 
Better yet, Crane was an outstanding gymnast 
at Penn State when, as the Nittany Lions' 
captain, she led her team to a fifth-place finish 
at the NCAA tournament in 1 991 . She has 
similar designs for the Illinois program. 

"This was my first year here, so coming in, 
I had great expectations for this team," Crane 
said. "I think a lot of my coaching styles and 
techniques were different from what this team 
was used to." 

Although the lllini struggled to a 4-14 
record overall and 1 -3 in the Big Ten, the win- 
loss record alone does not accurately reflect 
the improvement by season's end. "It was 
definitely a transition year, and we looked at 
it as such," Crane said. "We couldn't make 
huge strides last year. Although our record 
and our finish in the Big Ten may not have 
shown those great strides, I think you'll see an 
even bigger step being taken this year." 

Crane believes the team's seventh place finish 
at the conference tournament is not indicative of 
Illinois' ability. "Last year it was more of a 
season of 'Let's be consistent, let's be clean,' and 
we watered it down a bit," Crane said. "This 
year, we're going for it so we can compete 
against the best." 

Lastyear's lllini roster included five freshmen 
that, because of Illinois' lack of depth, 
contributed rightaway. Nicole "Puni" Viernes, 
selected as Illinois' MostOutstanding Gymnast, 
posted the top four scores for the lllini in the 
vault, including a score of 9.625 at the Big 
Ten Championships. Kari Karubas was one of 
the strongest bar and beam competitors, and 
she also rose to the occasion at last year's Big 
Ten meet. "It was great to see a freshman like 
Puni step into that role and take over as a 
leader as far as scoring," Crane said. 

The lllini were not without senior leadership, 
though. Kim Bathke and Mary Beth Clisham, 
both Academic All-Big Ten selections, will be 
missed. This year, Nicole Ward, Dina Slomski 
and Tracey Althans will move in to fill the gap 
caused by the departure of Bathke and Clisham. 

"Nicole has a tremendous work ethic. She's 
in the gym every single day and leads by 



example," Crane said. "Dina is the person who 
the girls can go to with their problems and 
Tracey tries to verbally get the team motivated. 
She's the team mom." 

Ward, who is Illinois' top returning performer 
in the floor exercise, credits Crane with the 
program's turnaround. "Of course you want to 
come out and win right away, but we had to 
make improvements and adjustments," Ward 
said. "We're working not necessarily harder, 
but smarter. [Crane] can actually tell us what it 
feels like to be there. So it helps a lot to have a 
coach that's been there." 

This year's team will once again feature a] 
strong, deep freshman class. Stacy Redmond, 
Kelli Farrar and Kristin Montero will be called 
upon to score for the lllini. "Gymnastically, wej 
have gained tremendously this year," Crane 
said. "We brought in six very strong freshmen. 
It's a very balanced, hard-working and motivated S 
group. Stacy and Kelli have had great exposure 
at the high school level as far as national 
competition. Certainly they are going to step up 
and shine this year. We can feel it already." 

The second year of Crane's tenure at Illinois 
brings with it higher expectations. The lllini will 
be shooting for a top-three finish at the Big Ten 
Championships, behind perennial powers 
Michigan and Penn State. The Wolverines have 
won the conference crown three years running. 

"We have just as much talent and we have the 
same skills as Michigan and Penn State," Ward 
said. "We just have to come together and be 
prepared for the season." 

An added incentive to move up in the 
conference ranks is the site of this year's Big Ten 
Championships. Huff Hall will host the meet this 
year, and Crane is pointing to the event already. 
"A big part of our focus is the Big Ten 
Championships," Crane said. "The girls are 
already talking about it and we're making an 
issue of it in the gym every day." 

Redmond cited the team's enthusiasm and 
closeness as keys for the upcoming season. 
Crane thinks that is precisely what will eventually 
put them over the top. "These are the kids you 
want to be working with. They are wonderful to 
work with and extremely motivated," Crane 
said. "These girls aren't satisfied until they qualify 
for the NCAA championships. We want Illinois 
to become a national power." 





Ul 

181.725 
180.800 
182.600 
187.900 
181.275 
183.475 
155.750 
1 80.475 
182.475 
183.175 



Nebraska 

Michigan St. 

Illinois State 

SE Missouri State 

UCLA 

Iowa 

Illinois-Chicago 

Northern Illinois 

California 

Illinois State 



Opp. 

185.20 
1 80.000 
186.880 
183.550 
192.875 
188.900 
188.700 
185.150 
189.625 
189.525 



ina Slomski leaps in the air during 
her balance beam routine for the 

mixed pairs exhibition in KenneyGym. 

Through experience and trials, the 

women's gymnastics team has 

strengthened this year. 






Women's Gymnastics 217 



<m 



■•\..- ■ 






dUlMiS 






a * 









Men's Gymnastics 

Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Colleen Christensen 



"Our goal is to win the Big Ten, and we can do 
it," said junior Goncalo Macedo, a member of the 
men's gymnastics team. 

Hopes are high for a team that has much 
improved itself over last year. The team views the 
1 993-1 994 season as a learning year for them, 
and with the experience they gained along with 
some key personnel additions the team is looking 
forward to this year. 

But coach Don Osborn does notwantto overlook 
last season completely. "It is a successful season 
anytimeyou can get to Regionals and qualify some 
people for Nationals," said Osborn as he pointed 
out last year's accomplishments. 

The 1994-1995 team, however, is much 
improved over last year's, especially in terms of 
their experience and team unity. "I think we are a 
lot closer knit this year. We are going to win as a 
team, not as individuals," said senior co-captain 
Brian Kobylinski. 

'The team now knows the importance of team 
spirit," said Macedo as he discussed the importance 
of dedication to the team over the individual No 
one expresses this better than Macedo who said, 
"I'm not really concerned about personal goals. If 
the team does well I know that I am doing my part." 

Macedo, who is from Lisbon, Portugal, competes 
internationally for Portugal in the World and the 
European Championships. From this he naturally 
brings to the team a wealth of experience and 
leadership. Macedo said thatwhen one competes 
against the very best in the world, there is no way 
not to gain something that will be helpful to himself 
and his team. Most recently, Macedo competed 
for Portugal atthe Senior European Championships 
in June where he finished a very respectable 34th 
out of the 1 30 competitors. 

Confidence is going to be an important factor 
in being competitive. The team feels it is much 
better than it was last year at this point, and 
believes they can be successful this season. The 
team isalso looking for some very big performances 

enn Su holds a position for a mom- 
ent during his floor exercise 
routine. The team's mixed pairs 
exhibition was held in Kenney Gym 
on Dec. 3, 7994. 



early in the season in order to keep this confidence 
high. There is the general feeling that a couple of 
victories or strong outings atthe start of the season 
will set the tone for the rest of the year. 

Coach Osborn is also looking for consistent 
performances from his athletes. "We need to 
make sure that we can do that - to have four good 
performances at each event," said Osborn. With 
the addition of Yuval Ayalon, another athlete with 
international experience, and the strides the 
returning members have made, Osborn sees no 
reason why this is not possible. 

The competition within the conference is 
extremely tough. Last year's winner, Ohio State, 
should bring backa strong team, butanyone in the 
conference has the possibility of winning. The U of 
I's team hopes go further than the Big Ten. Getting 
to Regionals and then qualifying as a team for 
Nationals are the men's gymnastics team's goals. 
Once again the idea of teamwork is crucial. 

"To do well at Nationals, you have to be there 
as a team," said Kobylinski. 







' 




Stan 


dings 


Ul 


Opp. 


274.90 


Michigan State 262.45 


271 .40 


Michigan 267.95 


276.70 


Iowa 280.45 


275.30 


Oklahoma 275.45 


278.30 


Illinois-Chicago 281.75 


278.80 


New Mexico 281.80 




NCAA Regionals 




Sixth Place 




I 



i ; 



: 



reg McGlaun swings around during 

ring competition for the mixed 

pairs meet. The competition within the 

Big Ten conference this year was 

extremely tough. 



Men's Gymnastics 219 



220 Sports 



I 







Men's Volleyball 



Story by Greg Lewickyj • Layout by Colleen Christensen 

The men's volleyball team had its most received offers to play at Division One 

successful season in its history last year in schools coming out of high school. Many of 

winning the Big Ten Championship. This them chose to play for a club team at Illinois 

has been the goal of the team since its due to academic commitments. With the 

beginnings, and they were finally able to talent they have, the team views itself as 

reach that goal and advance to nationals being among the top four teams within the 

which were held at Arizona State University, conference and throughout the Midwest in 

One of the big reasons for the general, 

performance of the team was a change in In order for this team to compete at the 

their head coach beginning in the spring, level of last year's team they need to 

Graduate student Claudio Paiva took over concentrate on aspects of their offensive 

the job as the coach and the team responded and defensive games. The volleyball team 

very well. "He was one of the primary is looking for more variety with their offense 

reasons for our success last year," said hoping that more quickness will allow them 

junior Terry Fallen. to utilize more fakes within their offensive 

When Paiva took over, he was very aware scheme. On the defensive side there is a 

of the talent on the team, but felt that their strong emphasis on backrow play, 

talent was not completely shining through. "Consistent passing sets up our offense. I 

"I knew all of the guys and I felt that they believe that every good volleyball team 

could be a very good team but that they starts with good passing," said Paiva. 

didn't know how to explore their potential Other keys for the team include 



on the court," said Paiva. 

With a renewed importance placed on 
the passing game and on overall defensive 
play the team certainly showed their Big 
Ten competitors their potential. 

The face of this year's team will look a 
little different. With the loss of some key 
players, including three starters, the team 



confidence and the ability to maintain a 
high energy level. "We need to believe 
more that we have got to make it happen on 
the court," said Paiva. 

This confidence should translate into a more 

aggressive team, and this in turn means a 

more confident team. Confidence and 

aggressiveness require a high energy level, 

will put some new people onto the court and and this must be present in order for success. 

will need them to perform. Lack of talent, "A key for us is for everyone to come out 

however, is not a concern of the team. and to keep their enthusiasm high all year 

"As far as talent, we have at least as long," said Fallen. If the team is able to put 

much as we did last year," said Fallen. these three ingredients together there is 

In fact, many of the members of the team little doubt in their having a great season. 




, $ 



i j 






ophomore Lawrence Lee prepares 
to spike the volleyball during a 
drill with the team. The men's 
volleyball team had its most 
successful season in its history 
last year in winning the Big 
Ten Championship. 



Sophomore Bill Gladdin jumps to 
spike the volleyball during a 
practice. Graduate student Claudio 
Paiva took over as the volleyball 
team's coach last year. 



Men's Volleyball 221 







eft fielder Kirsten Olson pounds a 
&■ ball into play against Lincoln Trail 
College. At the U of I, softball is not 
recognized as a Big Ten sport. 

enior Kristie Hoheisel pitches the 

ball during a game last year at 

the complex fields. The season 

starts at the end of March, and it 

goes through April. 



222 Sports 














Softball 



Story by Toi Michelle Walker • Layout by Jim McKellar 



The women's softball club has one major 
goal for the season: to become a part of the 
Big Ten. The club has been trying for three 
years now, and if the university picks 
softball, then this sport will be come Division 
One, and a member of the Big Ten. 

"The big thing for us is to gear ourselves 
up for Big Ten style and competition, 
because right now we aren't excused from 
missing classes for away games," said 
Melissa Lufkin. "So we have to have a big 
team. But if we were part of the Division 
One ranks we could have our best people 
out there on the field all of the time." 

Basically, the women's softball squad 
works hard all year to keep in shape for 
softball. During the season, the team 
practices every day that they do not have 
games. The season starts at the end of 
March, and it goes through April. In the 
fall, the team also practices every day. 
Members are not required to practice 
because they are only a club, but they are 
encouraged to attend. In addition to 
practices during the week, the softball club 
practices in the bubble in Memorial Stadium. 

Also, during the off season, the women's 
softball club lifts weights and runs together. 

"We like playing together and there is a 



team camaraderie," said Lufkin. "We play 
intramural sports together also, like 
basketball and volleyball. We really like 
being together, no matter what we play." 

In general, the softball club is strong, but 
one area of the team stands out above the 
rest. 

"Our pitching is very strong. Not only 
are our starters very good, but we have a 
solid corps of relievers too," Dina Elijah, 
club president, said. 

"Since the team is not recognized as a 
Big Ten sport, they are a registered student 
organization. They rely heavily on fund 
raisers and club dues to play softball," said 
Connie Johnson, club coach. "These girls 
play ball because they want to and they 
love it. No one is funding us. The little funds 
we get pay for uniforms and that is about 
it," Johnson added. 

Overall, the women's softball club is 
looking to make a good impression on the 
university so they can convince the Division 
of Intercollegiate Athletics to make the 
softball club a sport. The women's softball 
squad believes that they can successfully 
compete at the Division One level if given 
the chance. Until then, the umpire still yells, 
"Play ball!" 






I 



Softball 223 



Hi ■ 

:;|:|: imm ''f:?|:;; ; :i 

SI lit* if 

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113 HI 



Contrary to popular belief, the baseball team's 
biggest loss was not the season-ending 
heartbreaker that prevented the lllini from 
advancing to the Big Ten playoffs. Rather, the 
biggest loss came six months before the bitter 
extra-inning setback to Michigan. In November 
1993, standout shortstop Josh Klimek, a 
promising junior already drafted by theChicago 
White Sox, was lost for the 1 994 season after 
suffering a broken leg and a shoulder injury in 
a scooter accident. The accident forced Coach 
"Itch" Jones to tinker with a lineup that was in no 
need of tinkering. 

"Josh was definitely a big loss," second 
baseman Brain McClure said. "We really missed 
him lastyearand it showed. He's a hard worker, 
loves to compete and loves to win." 

Jones finally chose junior Brian Schullian, a 
rifle-armed catcher with a career batting average 
of .347. Schullian had broken into the lineup as 
a freshman at third base. Schullian 
understandably struggled at shortstop and was 
not the same player after the move. In a way, this 
experiment was a microcosm of Illinois' season. 

Illinois rebounded from a subpar road trip 
that saw them open the season against highly- 
ranked opponents in Miami and South Carolina. 
The lllini stumbled out of the blocks by going 2- 
6 on its annual southern trip. The team bounced 
back in a big way with an eight-game winning 
streak. In this stretch, the lllini battered opposing 
pitchers and averaged an astonishing 1 7 runs 
per game. Jones admitted that "we really 
exploded and hit the ball well." 

The offense, led by seniors Forry Wells, Ken 
Crawford and Andy Thompson and juniors Tom 
Sinak and Brian McClure, was Illinois' strength 
all season. Illinois' version of the 1 927 Yankees 
belted 76 home runs and averaged over eight 
runs per contest. 

Despite a potent lineup, the lllini dug themselves 
an early hole in the Big Ten race, a hole that would 
eventually prove too deep. Jones' team opened the 
conference schedule by dropping three of four 
games to Michigan State and traditional powers 
Minnesota and Ohio State. 

Illinois found new life after facing 
Northwestern and dominating the Wildcats to 
register three wins. From there, the lllini split 



(M €1: KM €i ■ i- 1® ; 



- 

.'•' ■"'■ ■ ' ■ ■ .■' / ' ■ ' 



Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Erin Evans 

with Purdue and Iowa, leaving them in a tough 
position entering the final series at home against 
Michigan. 

After losing a wild 13-12 decision in the first 
game, Illinois responded to its must-win situation 
by taking the next two games. This set up the 
deciding finale with the Wolverines. "It was a 
great series on both sides," Sinak said. "They 
got a few more breaks than we did and ended 
up beating us in extra innings. I felt we got hurt 
by a call, but you can never blame the whole 
series on one call." 

The 8-6 setback was a bitter ending to a 
season in which Illinois could not seem to make 
the pieces fit together. "I was disappointed, the 
coaching staff was disappointed and the players 
were disappointed in the fact that we finished 
26-26," Jones said. "We ran in cycles. When 
we hit well, we didn't pitch very well. When our 
pitching was very good, we didn't get the hits. 
There were some games where we had miscues 
defensively which hurt us. We were not consistent 
on a daily basis." 

Usually, Illinois was an opposing pitcher's 
nightmare. Powerful first baseman Wells, a 
first-team All-Big Ten selection, slugged 18 
homers and drove in 62 runs, both tops for the 
lllini. Center fielder Crawford provided an 
unexpected lift, joining Wells on the first team 
thanks to his new-found punch. 

Sinak, a junior right fielder, finished with a 
.418 batting average, one of seven offensive 
categories that he topped for Illinois. McClure, 
who has been a fixture at second base ever since 
his arrival two seasons ago, joined Sinak on the 
second team Big Ten squad. 

Junior college transfer Sean Williams stepped 
in to become the workhorse of the pitching staff. 
Williams led the team with six wins, four complete 
games and 57 strikeouts in 80.2 innings pitched. 
Junior southpaws Jeff Martin and Jason Wollard 
combined with the hard-throwing John Oestreich 
to round out the core of a pitching staff that 
enters the 1 995 season eager to prove itself. 

"Last year, our pitchers didn't come around 
like they were capable of," Jones said. "It's time 
that they go to the mound and take charge and 
carry the team through the season. Our pitchers 
have had the opportunity to mature physically; 



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they've had enough Big Ten games and enougl 
big ball games behind them." 

If Klimek returns to short, freshman Dann' 
Rhodes will likely inherit the third base job 
Jones has tossed around the idea of starting 
Klimek at third early on, in which case Rak 
Bogan will fill in at short. "Coach Jones talkec 
about putting me at third because there's not al 
much lateral movement, and then easing mi 
back to shortstop," Klimek said. "I should bi 
1 00% by the season, butyou never know becausi 
it's been up and down. It's taken a long time 
both physically and mentally, to get back ii 
shape." 

When Klimek reunites with roommati 
McClure to form a lethal double-plajl 
combination, Illinois will be tough to matchl 
"We'll be good up the middle again," Jonei 
said. "With Andy Kortcamp behind the plate 
McClure at second and either Klimek or Bogar 
at shortstop, that will be a strength." 

The departure of Crawford and Thompsoril 
leaves a gap in the outfield alongside Sinak 
Two freshmen, Dusty Rhodes and Sean Bennettl 
should get a chance to contribute right away] 
"They have a lot to learn out there, but both oi 
them have a lot of natural ability and a grea 
work ethic as well," Sinak said. "It's very hard tc 
come in as a freshman and play, but they're 
being forced into the situation with Crawford 
and Thompson leaving." 

Once again, the lllini will contend for the Bici 
Ten title, but Klimek's return, the pitching staf 
and production out of the freshmen arequestiorj 
marks. Because of these variables, McClure i: 
heading into the season cautiously. "This year 
I've made my goals game-by-game oriented,') 
McClure said. "I think that was one of out 
problems. A lot of times, we weren't ready tc 
play every game. Maybe we were looking 
ahead too far down the road instead ot 
concentrating on the games ahead of us." 

To turn the preseason predictions into reality, 
Jones' team will have to continue its clutch 
hitting of a year ago. "We hope thatthe returning 
players will come in and be consistent performers 
for us," Jones said. "It's up to them now to star! 
getting the clutch RBIs. They have the ability to 
do that." 



224 Sports 



Pitcher Sean Williams tosses a strike against Western Michigan. Williams led 
the team with six wins, four complete games and 57 strikeouts in 80.2 
innings pitched. 

enior outfielder, Andy Thompson, dives back into first base safely against 
Northwestern. Illinois found new life after facing Northwestern and dominating 
the Wildcats to register three wins. 







Mb- 

Jffwm 





1 11 1111 Mm I 






Standings 


Ul 




Opp. 


6 


Michaigan State 1 


2 


Michigan State 


i 3 


2 


Michigan State 


5 6 


9 


Michigan State 


i 5 


8 


Minnesota 


12 


9 


Minnesota 


8 


5 


Minnesota 


8 





Minnesota 


14 


2 


Ohio State 


9 


15 


Ohio State 


4 


3 


Ohio State 


6 


2 


Ohio State 


6 


21 


Northwestern 


3 


11 


Northwestern 


4 


21 


Northwestern 


1 


3 


Purdue 


5 


4 


Purdue 


3 


3 


Purdue 


4 


6 


Purdue 





5 


Iowa 


6 


7 


Iowa 


8 


j 7 


Iowa 


4 


11 


Iowa 


9 


12 


Michigan 


13 


8 


Michigan 


5 


4 


Michigan 


1 


6 


Michigan 


8 




:/ M 










y9& 



Kris Dupps 



Kris Dupps, a senior for- 
ward on the women's basket- 
ball team, ended her career in 
record book style. In her four 
seasons at Illinois, Dupps 
started 99 consecutive games 
dating back to her first game 
on Nov. 23, 1991. Her 1,232 
career points and 716 career 
rebounds placed her seventh 
and fourth, respectively, in 
Illinois history. 

Dupps ' role on the team was 
as a leader because she was the 
only senior. The other team 
members respected her and 
what she did for the program. 
Despite all of her efforts , Dupps 
never got the chance to play on 



an Illini team that finished with 
a winning record or made the 
NCAA tournament. 

Dupps' grew up 30 miles 
outside of Columbus, Ohio. 
She had always wanted to 
play in the Big Ten and de- 
cided to come to Illinois after 
visiting Wisconsin, Illinois 
State and West Virginia. 

After graduation, Dupps, 
an environmental science ma- 
jor, hoped to be involved in 
wildlife management or work 
for the Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency. However, 
she was not completely ruhng 
out playing some basketball 
after college. 




-Darren King 



Ultimate frisbee 

The Illinois ultimate frisbee club took its aerial 
show to Baton Rouge, La. , for a Mardi Gras tourna- 
ment in February. 

Ultimate frisbee is a non-contact combination of 
soccer and football. Players are required to toss the 
frisbee to one another along the 70-yard field until 
scoring in the endzone. Each score is worth one point 
with a game ending when a team scores 13 points. 
However, a team must win by two points up to 15. 

The disc has to be passed between a team's seven 
competing players. A turnover occurs anytime the 
frisbee is intercepted, hits the ground or is thrown 
out-of-bounds. A typical game lasts between one- 
and-a-half to two-and-a-half hours. 



Underwater hockey 



tsasama 



Teams from all over the United States, Canada and 
even the United Kingdom came to Huff Hall for the 
"Coven in the Corn" Underwater Hockey Tournament. 

The sport is played on the bottom of a swimming 
pool, with the swimmers equipped with a headgear, 
mask, scuba fins and snorkel. The puck weighs ap- 
proximately 1,200 to 1,500 grams and is composed of 
lead. The hockey sticks are made of wood, or any 
material that floats horizontally in water. 

The object of the sport is to push the puck along the 
bottom of the pool into the opposing team's goal. A 
player needs to swim rapidly and must constantly hold 
his or her breath and surface dive. A spectator only 
knows that a goal has been scored when the referee 
emerges from the water and waves his hands. 

The team from Great Britain travelled far, but their 
long trip paid off winning the tournament with a 5-4 
win over St. Louis. Illinois finshed third with a 10-2 
victory over Ohio State. 



Simeon Rice stays 

Simeon Rice, a junior 
Illini outside linebacker, an- 
nounced that he would re- 
main at Illinois for his se- 
nior year rather than enter 
the NFL draft. 

Rice said he was only in- 
terested in being the num- 
ber one pick in the draft in 
April of 1994, and since he 
had no guarantee, he would 
complete his college eligibil- 
ity. The consensus among 
Lou Tepper and eight to ten 
general managers was that 
Rice would be a 10-20 pick 
in the first round. 



Rice's 16 quarterback 
sacks were the second-most 
in the nation and earned him 
a spot on the American Foot- 
ball Coaches Association 
and Football News 
Magazine's All-American 
first-team and recognition 
by the Big Ten as Defensive 
Lineman of the Year. 

Despite all of this, Rice 
was still not satisfied with 
his performance this past 
season. He recorded just five 
tackles without a sack in Il- 
linois' last three regular sea- 
son games. 




-Carlos Miranda 



Carmel Corbett 



Jan. 24, 1995 



Carmel Corbett has worked 
hard at becoming an outstanding 
athlete at Illinois. Last year at 
the NCAA Track and Field Cham- 
pionships she earned a fourth 
place finish in the heptathalon 
and the Illini standout All-Ameri- 
can honors. 

Corbett came to Illinois from 
Titirangi, New Zealand, where 
she received the national high 
school record. As a sophomore at 
Illinois she won the Big Ten title 
in the high jump and the 
heptathalon, an event in which 
she ended up placing 13th in the 
NCAA meet. 

Since then, Corbett has added 
four more big Ten titles to her list 
of accomplishments, and she has 
broken six Illinois school records 
and set three Big Ten marks. 

Corbett's achievements ex- 
tended to the classroom as well. 
She majored in exercise physiol- 
ogy and had many options to con- 
sider after graduation including 
graduate schools and job offers. 



:.':: 



Illini wheelchair racing 

Illini wheelchair racing team 
members, Ann Walters and James 
Briggs, placed first in the Detroit 
marathon. Walters, an Illinois 
graduate student, placed four 
minutes ahead of the second place 
finisher. She finished the race 
with a time of 2:07 while Briggs 
completed the course in 1:37.15. 

One of Walters' biggest com- 
petitors was the rough roads of 
Detriot. She fixed her first flat 
tire at mile 23 and the same tire 
flattened a half mile later. Walters 
finished the race with her 




tire unrepaired. 

Graduate student Scott 
Hollonbeck also was troubled by 
the rugged terrain when his tire 
went flat, and he was forced to 
finish the last three miles with 
only one inflated wheel. 
Hollonbeck placed third with a 
time of 1:41.12. 

The race began in Canada and 
continued into Michigan. Sixty 
other racers competed in the 
men's division, and recent Illi- 
nois graduate Tony Iniguez fin- 
ished fourth. 



clippings 




Big Ten honors 



KfTWMlU* 



In November of 1994, Dana 
Howard, the senior linebacker from 
East St. Louis, was named Defensive 
Player of the Year. Erin Borske was 
also named Freshman of the Year 
when the Big Ten announced its post- 
season volleyball and football awards . 

Senior outside hitter on the Illinois 
women's volleyball team, Julie 
Edwards, who set an Illinois single 
season record with 476 lolls and re- 
corded a team-high 332 digs , was named 
to the 12-member All-Big Ten Team. 

Borske, also an outside hitter, was 
honored after an Illini freshman-high 
record of 452 kills and 332 digs. 

This was the second consecutive 
year that Howard won the Defensive 
Player of the Year award. He was the 
only unanimous selection by the me- 
dia panel and the coaches. Howard 
led the Big Ten with 141 tackles and 
became Illinois' and the Big Ten's 
all-time leading tackier in his final 
season in Champaign. 

Seven other teammates joined 
Howard in being honored. Rush line- 
backer Simeon Rice and drop line- 



-TTT— — — — — 



Men's track 




backer Kevin Hardy, both juniors, 
were selected to the first team by each 
panel. Rice was also named defensive 
lineman of the year. 

Inside linebacker John Holecek, a 
four-year starter, was named to the 
second team in each poll. Also named 
to the second team was senior tight 
end Ken Dilger, who caught a career- 



— Darren King 

high 41 passes for 547 yards. Junior 
safety Antwoine Patton was named a 
second-teamer by the coaches. 

Senior kicker Chris Rich- 
ardson, Illinois' second all-time 
leading scorer, and senior right 
guard Jonathon Kerr, a co- 
captain, were both given honor- 
able mention. 



ESHHEEE3I 



Men's volleyball 



The men's track and field team posted victories in 
three events at the prestigious Drake Relays in Des 
Moines, Iowa, ninois has totaled 123 wins in the 85-year 
history of the event, the most by any school. 

Cold weather and snow showers forced the university 
division of the pole vault indoors. Despite this change of 
location, Daren McDonough, sophomore, cleared a per- 
sonal-best 18 feet, 1 1/4 inches. By doing so, he met the 
automatic qualifying standard for the NCAA Champion- 
ships. The vault was the third best in Illinois history. 

J . D . Teach won the university division of the shot put 
for the second time with a recorded toss of 58-10 1/4. 

Anthony Jones became the first Dliniin 30 years, and 
fourth overall, to win the university division of the 100- 
meter dash. 



mimbbpmi 

The Illinois men's volleyball club won the Big Ten 
Championship in April and four team members also 
earned individual awards. 

The third-seeded Illini defeated No. 5 Michigan 9- 
15, 15-10, 15-10, to snag the title. Michigan started the 
first game with four consecutive points and did not 
give up their lead. In the second game Illinois took a 
seven-point lead, but almost lost the game until fresh- 
man Lawrence Lee helped Illinois to get the side out 
and stop the Michigan rally. 

Senior Erik Kirstein earned the award for tourna- 
ment MVP in addition to being named to the All- 
Tournament team at the Midwest Intercollegiate \ ol- 
leyball Assocation. Freshman Eric Brown received 
first team All-Tournament honors. Also awarded were 
Andy Nedzeland and Joey Pacis, who were named to 
the tournament's second team. 




Freshman sensation Erin 
Borske upstaged the rest of 
her team at the annual 
Alumni Match at Huff gym. She 
earned 23 kills, seven digs and 
one ace to lead her team to a 
two sets down, come from 
behind victory. 

Borske proved that she was an 



— Daily Illini file photo 

aggresive hitter and passer, and 
this has not changed since her 
career at Stagg High School where 
she led her team to the IHSA state 
finals her senior year. She was 
named Chicago Sun Times Player 
of the Year her senior year, as 
well as being selected a high school 
Ail-American. 



The Illinois women's swimming 
season came to an end at the Big Ten 
Championships in Indianapolis. 

The Ulini Finished in eighth place 
with 198 points. Last year they fin- 
ished in 10th place. Illinois scored 
90.5 points at last year's champion- 
ships. The Illinois swimmers also 
broke nine of their school records at 
the championships. 

Jennifer Sands fell just short of 
becoming the first Illini Big Ten 
champion in 13 years. She swam 
the 200-yard freestyle in 1:48.73, 
and in doing so, broke an Illinois 
varsity record. 

Renee Gamboa also placed for 
the Illini, finishing seventh in the 
100-yard butterfly and fifth in the 
100-yard breastroke with a time 
of 1:04.11. 

In the relay events , Illinois' 200- 
yard medley relay team broke a 
varsity record with a time of 
1 : 46 . 1 7 . The squad finished in sixth 
place. Also, the 800-yard free- 
style relay team finished ninth 
and earned consideration for the 
NCxA4 championship. 



Women netters 

After a two-week layoff between competions, the 
Illinois women's tennis team shined at the Brown 
Inivitational in Providence, R.I. 

Sophomore Laura Rydberg grabbed second place 
in Flight C singles losing only to Stacey Strolovitz of 
Rutgers in the championship, 2-6, 6-2, 6-4. Rydberg 
also teamed up with sophomore Jennifer Shu to win the 
Flight D doubles tournament. 

Senior Lissa Limmel took third place in Flight B 
singles after downing Kirsten Odabashian of Brown, 
6-2, 6-2. Kimmel and sophomore Susanne Land ad- 
vanced to the semifinals of the Flight A doubles tour- 
nament before losing. 

Senior Sara Marshack also made her mark by win- 
ning her Flight D third-place match over Meghan Rao 
of Penn, 6-2, 6-1. Marshack also teamed up with 
sophomore Jessica Klapper to reach the finals of the 
Flight C tournament. 




■■ 



Women's soccer 

The Illini women's soccer team's season ended on 
a bright note. They finished with a conference title, 
17 wins and a fourth straight year with a semifinal 
berth in the NCCSA tournament. The team did not 
win the national championship in Phoenix, but they 
tied their all-time high win total nonetheless. They 
were also the only team to advance to the semifinal 
round in four straight years. 

Throughout the entire season, Illinois was able 
to dominate its opponents offensively and im- 
prove its goal total from last season. 

Leading the way was freshman forward Pam 
Lachcik, who broke the season scoring record of 
12 goals, six of them occuring in one weekend. 
Four year starter Jenny Bates graduated, but 
juniors Paula Minor, Fenna Bonsignore and Kim 
Schimmel plan to continue the tradition. 

Junior Janet Oberle improved throughout the 
season at midfield, and next season she will be 
joined by junior Chris Marty and sophomore 
Missy Kahn. Illinois' backs were led by seniors 
Chris Sorquist and Christie Cochran, juniors 
Darcy Burger, Joy Ehlenfeldt and Kate Beynolds 
and sophomore Susan Crawford. 

Returning at goal next season will be freshmen 




— Claudette Roulo 

Erica Loechl and Jayme Warning. Also joining them 
will be sophomore Lauren Tobey . Loechl was named 
to the All-Tournament Team at Nationals. 



Rodeo Club 



mmsMM 



The Rodeo Club, with a history of more than 20 years on campus, is 
one of the many registered student organizations at the U of I. Accord- 
ing to club president Mike Douglas, the club was in its prime during the 
early 1980s; however, the recent trend toward country-western style 
has increased the club's membership. 

This year, the Rodeo Club boasts about 60 members, half of which are 
university students, while the other half are just interested people from 
the Champaign-Urbana area. 

People can become lifetime members of the club by only paying a $10 
fee. Members are encouraged to come to all the practices and to partici- 
pate in different riding styles. 

The club met for weekly practices on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:30 
p.m. During these sessions, devoted members improved their bucking, 
machine bareback bull and saddle bronc riding styles for their events. 

Most members competed in open shows, and some were eventually 
invited to participate in Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association shows 
in Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana. 



Illini hockey 



memM 

Illinois senior goalie Pete Streit inherited a 7-3 
deficit from sophomore Devin Huber against Univer- 
sity of Michigan-Dearborn, but he was able to stop all 
16 shots fired at him as the Illini rallied to win 8-7. 

Streit started the next night and succeeded in 
stopping all 21 shots in the second period and al- 
lowed only four goals in the entire game. The Illini 
won the game, and this improved Streit's season 
record to 3-0-0. 

Despite his senior standing, Streit had not seen 
much playing time. The goalie had the misfortune of 
coming to Illinois with standouts Terry Kasdan, a 



fellow senior, and Jon Younger, 1994 graduate. 

In the shadow of these two players, Streit had 
only seven starts in three years for a record of 6-1- 
and never had a complete game at home. 

The Illini said goodbye to assistant coach Herb 
Whitely during the series against Dearborn. Whitely 
moved to Connecticut to accept another job. 
Whitely's responsibilities included making the de- 
fensive calls and running occasional practices. In 
addition to his involvement with the hockey pro- 
gram, Whitely was also an associate professor in 
Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine . 



Student Olympian 



■MMUUll 

Junior Goncalo Macedo came to Illinois from Lisbon , 
Portugal, because he needed an environment that 
would be conducive to both studying and gymnastics. 

Macedo began competing in club gymnastics when 
he was only 9 years old. His career soared and he found 
himself competing all over Europe. As a high school 
senior, he made it to the World Championships in 
Indianapolis where he found out more about American 
schools and their programs. 

Macedo and his father visited Illinois, and he de- 
cided to enroll without checking out any other schools. 
He is an international business major, but he came to 
the university with only two years of English. He had to 
enroll in an English intensive, two month course but 
had to drop out after only one month because of an 
opportunity to go to the 1992 Summer Olympics in 
Barcelona. The experience inspired him to set a goal of 
competing in the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. 

Macedo is enjoying his stay at the university, and 
even though he has found it hard to balance all the 
aspects of a student-athlete's life, he enjoys the cama- 
raderie and team spirit that he found at Illinois. 




-Daily Illini file photo 



Wheelchair basketball 



At the UIUC Invitational Wheelchair Basketball tournament, the Illinois 
men's basketball team went up against the Chicago Bulls. Illinois and the Bulls 
have met in the regional final for the last two seasons with Illinois winning in 1993 
and the Bulls in 1994. The game was close through its entirety, and the score was 
tied at 42-42 when the clock ran out. In overtime, Josh Fabian led Illinois to 
victory with a five point run, and the final score was 57-52. 




/ 




raternities, sororities and organizations cause some of the biggest 

changes in the lives of students at the U of I. For some, these outlets 

provide the opportunity to help others and work for good causes. Others end 

up meeting the people who become their closest friends - often for the rest of their lives. 

This year's changes have been prominent in many organizations on campus. One 
thing remains certain, though - without the groups that make up the U of I there would 
be no change. This of course includes changes that benefit all students. 

One change that many Greek houses decided to undertake was a reduction in the 
length of their pledgeships. Alpha Delta Pi was just one of the houses that cut the time 
of their pledge program to four short weeks. Other houses made a change this year by 
devoting extra time to awareness programs. Delta Gamma took the time to set up 
alcohol, rape and AIDS awareness programs to educate their members. As for 
fraternities, Pi Kappa Alpha started a new tradition around Christmas that reminded 
everyone of the importance of giving during the holiday season. Pikes started a clothing 
drive that allowed the whole campus to participate in donating items to help the poor. 

This year many new groups sprung up around campus. The Illini Media Company 
added a new member to its family with the birth of The Issue, a new magazine that 
focuses on controversial topics that U of I students are most likely to come across 
during their years at the university. The magazine also tries to highlight the work and 
experiences of its peers. Old groups made changes also. 107.1 The Planet moved out 
of the basement of Weston Residence Hall to a new location on Green Street. 

Every fraternity, sorority, club and organization undergoes a big change every year 
that is a result of the change in students that compose them. Members of all the groups 
on campus are constantly expanding the diversity within their groups by bringing in 
new people with individual views and ideas. The time, effort and commitment of 
individuals are able to come together and form more powerful structures that can 
really get things done. From the inner growth of individuals to the acts they 
accomplish as a group, these clubs and the degrees of change that they make provide 
the U of I with the foundation for greatness. 






■■» - % ' ' 



DEGREES OF 




Pamela Riley 

Greeks & Organizations Editor 




of Contents 



Acacia 


280 


Alpha Chi Omega 


244 


Alpha Delta Phi 


240 


Alpha Delta Pi 


278 


Alpha Epsilon Phi 


239 


Alpha Epsilon Pi 


280 


Alpha Gamma Delta 


236 


Alpha Gamma Rho 


237 


Alpha Gamma Sigma 


238 


Alpha Kappa Lambda 


281 


Alpha Omicron Pi 


242 


Alpha Phi 


245 


Alpha Sigma Phi 


284 


Alpha Tau Omega 


243 


Alpha Xi Delta 


281 


Beta Theta Pi 


246 


Chi Omega 


272 


Delta Chi 


252 


Delta Delta Delta 


285 


Delta Gamma 


248 


Delta Tau Delta 


251 


Delta Upsilon 


285 


Delta Zeta 


250 


Farmhouse 


253 


Four-H 


254 


Gamma Phi Beta 


247 


Kappa Alpha Theta 


256 



Kappa Delta 


258 


Kappa Delta Rho 


291 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 


259 


Kappa Sigma 


260 


Phi Delta Theta 


299 


Phi Kappa Psi 


304 


Phi Kappa Tau 


305 


Phi Kappa Theta 


303 


PhiMu 


268 


Phi Sigma Kappa 


267 


Phi Sigma Sigma 


270 


Pi Beta Phi 


262 


Pi Kappa Alpha 


292 


Pi Lambda Phi 


290 


Psi Upsilon 


305 


Sigma Chi 


266 


Sigma Delta Tau 


261 


Sigma Gamma Rho 


296 


Sigma Kappa 


264 


Sigma Lambda Gamma 


286 


Sigma Phi Epsilon 


298 


Sigma Pi 


299 


Sigma Tau Gamma 


297 


Theta Chi 


287 


Theta Xi 


291 


Triangle 


302 


Zeta Psi 


286 




Pcinhel/IFC/BGC 
Page 274 



*~^S he Illio would like to extend a personal thank you 
to all of the chapters that have continued their support of 
the University of Illinois' yearbook throughout the years. 



PaueSOO 





Alpha Gamma Delta: First Row: Amy Sklenicka, Stephanie Corn, Alison Horsely, Thalassa Tam, Jenifer Hedborn, Kristina Summers, Kim Abaizino, Susan Bingham, Chrissy Wilson, 
Bridget Ehmann, Ritu Gupta, Nina Selvagio. Second Row: Cheryl Schmelebeck, Lauren Pintor, Meg Gardner, Jamie Rennick, Nicole Stack, Jennifer Van Kirk, Dawn Haag, Kristin Kent, 
Lisa Piovosi, Lisa McLaughlin, Megan McHale, Ashlea Raymond. Third Row: Julie Koca, Julie Campion, Jennifer Larson, Amanda Veihman, Brooke Patterson, Carline Vandy. Amanda 
Farrel, Renee Nowicki, Kim Vieau, Amy Falconer, Celia Boewe, Rehka Subbiah, Stephanie Brewer, Christy Lynde. Beth Mason, Katy Bursiek, Tarea Yurko, Amanda Williams, Robin 
Haiges. Fourth Row: Alison Coen, Lisa Parciak, Karen Lualhati, Dana Gasiorowski, Lynn Waldorf, Kara Starkman, Liz Douglas, Emma Brennan, Gretchen Hoffer, Kristin Reardon, Colleen 
Brown, Courtney Shaver, Erika Nelson, Sarah Johnson, Karen Wiseman, Emily Diehl, Fifth Row: Tracy Wolniewicz, Becky Randall, Tara Blinn, Kelly Rahmanian, Susan Barr, Nicole 
Jackman, Jane Hayjek, Kara Spohr, Alanna Palmer, Noell Sogge, Becky Sliva, Kristen Wuich, Lisa Rosenfield, Marci Gorski. Sixth Row: Muffy Drake, Kelly Raab, Karen Barr. Jennifer 
Reierson, Kim Harper, Colleen Starkey, Rebecca Schenk, Julie Schoeninger, Liz Gentry, Melinda Kelly, Jenny Arndt, Krista Peters. Yvonne Chin, Angela Sacchitello, Nikki Crawford. 
Alison Dudly, Angela Bonello. Seventh Row: Jen Adamo, Cindy Stutz, Andrea Sica, Sarah Smith, Amy Gustafson, Krista Simmons, Amy Moore, Tracy Ohlinger, Gloria Camarenj. lodi 
Norbut, Melissa Tekulve, Jen Letzkus, Dana Ingrassia. Eighth Row: Jen Demay, Christy Hoheisal, Teri Kil, Kim Cummings, Jodi Schiller, Laura Bandy, Kathy Sullivan, Lisa Gardner. 
Shannon Schaab, Alyson Lemke, Julie Aden, Jeanne Auer, Michelle Gazdik, Shannon Riley. Ninth Row: Jen Anderson, Staci Stuedle, Neely Weaver, Julie Summers, Melissa Root, Lori 
Bruce Lorien Ryan, Vanessa Puchalski, Lauren Ofenloch, Kim Lakin, Lisa Fisher, Heather Brown, Lauren McDermott, Stephanie Mullen, Julie Bailey. Lisa Alvarez, Laura Velasquez, 
Lori Kempton. 



Chapter Name 

Alpha Gamma Delta 

Nickname 

Alpha Gams 

Chapter Colors 

Red, Buff& Green 

Symbol 

Squirrel 

Chapter Flower 

Rose 

Philanthropy 

Juvenile Diabetes 

Foundation 

Address 

1106 S. Lincoln 



. 





Vlpha Gamma Rho: First Row: Kent Rupp, Ben Wenzel, Chad Ruppert, Aaron Vancil, John Dickinson, Dan Lane, Doug Lakamp, Ryan Aupperle, Jeremy Morris, Dan Smith, Nathan 
Vugspurger, Bret Hitchings, Andy Shissler. Second Row: Shane Koonce, Tom Courson, Jason Duzan, Chad Kalaher, Alan Miller, Jeremy Ross, Jim Connel, Mike Hoffman, Chris Peter, 
iteve Murphy, Todd Osterbur, Mark Hoge, Barry Bliss. Third Row: Ben Poletti, Allen Venters, Matt O'Donnel, Dave Mouser, Wade Baumgartner, Jim Hughes, Jim O'Brien, Tom Burenga, 
■Jick Lykins, Cliff Peterson, Ty Trisler, Bill Adams, Stephen Lang, Jason Pickrell, Reich Schott, Greg Houston. Fourth Row: Bryce Rupert, Jon Heyen, Bradley Wolter, Steve Knodle, 
ieth Baker, Kyle McMillan, Tom Foley, Jared White, Justin Bush, Tom Sutter, Mike Brooks, Brian Cahill. 



Greeks 





Alpha Gamma Sigma: First Row: Craig Tanner, John Tutland. Brian Fogarty, Scott Biros. Jeff Behme, Dave Dorn, Tim Kellogg. Aaron. Heinzman, Scott MozingO. Second R<>\\ Chas 
Knobloch, Nick Block, Matt Cole, Rob Prasse, Todd Miller, Wayne Tanner. Nate Miller, Eric Mowen. Bill Taylor. Third Row: Josh Iungrich. Brad White. Man Jewell. Derek Shrol Sq&J 
Bretthauer, Matt Proffit, Dave King, Mike Hemman, Rob Allman. Fourth Row: Rob Brown, Clayton Blanchette. Chad Bingman. Kevin Monk. Brian Meyer. Doug Raber. Josh Kempel 
Greg Brown, Rusty Maulding. Therron Dieckman, Brent Baker. Brian Riemer. Fifth Row: Jay Tamblyn, Brian Anderson, Chad Miller. Tim Samel. Karl Scherer. Kyle Sands. Blain Eden 
Jeff Boldt, Mike Dare, Aaron Morris. 




4SHP 



Chapter Name 

Alpha Gamma Sigma 

Nickname 

Illidell 

Chapter Colors 

Royal Blue & Sih>er 

Symbol 

Plow 

Chapter Flower 

American Beauty Red 

Rose 

Philanthropy 

Adopt a School/Habit 

for Humanity 

Address 
303 E. Chalmers 




Alpha Gamma Sigma Seniors: First Row: Matt Cole. Nate Miller, Jeff Behme. Nick Block. Second Row: Bill Taylor, Eric Mowen. Chris Knobloch. Scott Biros. Rob Prasse Third 
Row: Wayne Tanner, Todd Miller. 




Jpha Epsilon Phi: First Row: Jen Strauss, Rachel Kelber, Genna Chanenson, Amy Braverman, Jennifer April, Rachel Weinhaus, Rochelle Fetter, Lon Kreloff, Mindy Neidich, Lindy 
.oldfader. Jill Suroff, Gail Bianchi, Jill Smiley, Jen Flaig, Erin Schwartz, Liz Schartz, Bonnie Rosen, Jamie Berk, Jamie Moeckler, Jaime Rosenstein. Second Row: Jen Leavitt, Alisa Kirsche, 
lison Morris, Lauren Mednick, Hillary Silber, Kerry Berger, Jocelyn Fischer, Amy Friedman, Jenny Hilb, Parul Shah, Charlotte Iszak, Alison Royce, Wendy Diamond, Liz Melam, Marci 
'■ties, Celia Weeks, Kathy Ballsrud, Jodie Serlin, Maya Israel, Jen Longawa, Dee Bolos, Lisa Walner, Tricia Shepard, Becky Metcalfe. Third Row. Frannie Goldberg, Rachel Feldheim, 
lichele Bezman, Michelle Shames, Sara Stopek, Amy Fine, Stephanie Ladin. Jenny Smith, Gayle Warm, Missy Kahn, Jen Kramer. Amy Salasche, Staci Levin, Erin Orloff, Marci Mirkin, 
randy Schwechter, Debbie Bogoslaw, Mari Violad, Jen Rudich, Karen Bernstein. Fourth Row: Val Bolon, Suzanne Beauvoir, Michelle Bauer, Keren Stolman, Jenny Soshnik, Tal Selinger, 
leather Levie, Marti Rosen, Jody Shinsky, Adena Bendow. Fifth Row: Emily Yusim, Amanda Mazur, Stacey Lipitz, Jill Goldstein, Corrie Kahan, Heather Klevens, Shannon Cale, Mancy 
lutzky, Dana Weisberg, Carolyn Sperle, Rachel Libman, Mikki Miller, Keren Hasbani, Sharon Rendel, Heather Kelmachter, Kim Johnson, Julie Pearl, Shannon Fitzgerald, Amy Katz. 
my Schwartz. Lisa Goodman. Sixth Row: Anna Eisner, Eve Newman, Carrie Mans, Robyn Kaplan, Stephanie Hertzman, Dayns Salasche, Kristen Fahlen, Joanna Rhodes, Stacey Goldstein, 
eed Berger, Cindy Corey, Danielle Pritzker, Darby Willis, Laura Saunders, Rachel Goldstein, Dana Berk, Robyn Rosenkopf, Dana Mantell, Stephanie Hausen, Shara Haimes, Erica 
:emshein, Allison Singer, Meredith Weiss, Dana Piet. Kim Haskell, Rachael Abarbanel, Julie Barman, Jenny Allswang, Jenn Mann. Seventh Row: Claire Sherman, Ami Wattenberg, Marcy 
ohen, Stephanie Simon, Marianne Schachter, Karin Leavitt, Laura Greenberg, Jen Reitman, Debbie Cohen, Heather Gould, Jami Levun, Jenn Kaplan, Melanie Rosen, Vicki Gainsberg, 
yse Froy, Rachel Holtzman. Jessica Miller, Alice Rogers, Zoe Sonenberg, Lynn Kreloff. 



Greeks 2h\ 





ion, a fraternity is a group of men joined 
ther by common interests with the purpose of 
>rning true brothers. If this definition were closely 
:red to, then Alpha Delta Phi is one of the true 
:ernities at the U of I. This strong bond of broth- 
erhood that exists within Alpha Delta Phi extends not 



oniy throu 
college c 
throughout 
It is this qua 
lows Alpha 
the adva 
found in oth 
campus, 
initiated as far 
1940s sti 
visit the house 
ing homecom- 
brotherhood 
when they 
pus has only 
ger since 
The Alpha Delt 
erally ac- 
as one of the 
sive struc- 
pus, being rec- 
historical land- 
U.S. Depart- 
terior. T 
the annu 
Party, which is 
party at the U 
from this phil- 
event go to- 
the Sierra 
in environ- 
tection. Alpha 





Chapter Name 

Alpha Delta Phi 

Nickname 

Alpha Delt's 

Chapter Colors 

Wliite, Green & Black 

Symbol 

Star, Crescent, Sword, Spear 

& Monument 

Chapter Flower 

Lily of the Valley 

Philanthropy 

Sierra Club 

Address 
310 E. John 



brother's 
er but 

is lifetime. 

ty which al- 
Delts manyof 
tages not 
houses on 
Brothers that 
back as the 
continue to 
annually dur- 
ing. The 
that existed 
lived on cam- 
grown stron- 
graduation. 
house is gen- 
knowledged 
most impres- 
tures on cam- 
ognized as a 
mark by the 
mentoftheln- 
house hosts 
Moosehead 
the largest 
of I. Proceeds 
anthropic 
ward helping 
Club's efforts 
mental pro- 
Delts are 
. Because of 



leaders in many facets of campus life 
their involvement and their strong emphasis on broth- 
erhood, Alpha Delts can consistently recruit quality 
members to experience a brotherhood which is sec- 
ond to none. The strength of their chapter was 
apparent when their chapter recently received the 
E.O. Blackman Award for chapter excellence, the 
most prestigious award from one of the oldest sur 
ing fraternities. 






pha Delta Phi: First Row: Ed Obuchowski, Andy Grieve, Dan Kardatzke, Chris Rosy, Doug Handley, Rob Rokisiak, Jay Schwan, Jon Acosta, Erik Cook, Jeff Smith, 
el Stopka, Roland Carroll, Brian Murphy. Second Row: Patrick Hutchins, John Hogan, Brian Duffy, Brad Pirello, Al Augustine, Tim Meeker, Steve Stone, Gil Dysico, 
:vin Alstrin, Brian Grote, Marty Walsch, Noah Carmichael, Chris Todd, Chris Flenner, Tony Bloemer, John Peisker (House Advisor). Third Row: Jason Tilly, Mike 
isak, Jason Hutchison, Paul Radosevich, Jeremy Brody, Mike Stevens, Tim Hughes, Jeff Crusius, Steve Rickenbrode, Lee Kubicki, Dave Langlands, Scott Jackson, 
iron Wilkins, Anil Shah. 



Greeks 241 





^osn 



Alpha Omicron Pi: Front Row: Michelle I. Svetlic, Pamela J. Brown, Sura B. Langley, Alexia Limbos, Allison L Annacone. Second Row: Rachel C. Mulchrone Jaime N Baldner l aitlii 
E. Aveyard, Alison M. Mondul, Mary E. Janas, Erica D. Ecklund. Heather E. Knox. Nicole M. Czech. Rebecca A. Ullrick Lori A Smith. Third Row: Natalie I \\ ieber Jennifer l 
Rachel J. Kopay, Kristen M. Beba, Rene L. Fisher. Sarah R. Goldfarb. Lauren M. Baloun. Amy R. Nordbrock, Elisa V. Biancalana. Amy J. Hart, Amy J. Brandatino, Sara R. Maher, MeliSS 
L. Mitchel. Fourth Row: Preetindar K. Ghuman, Beth A.Johnsen, Gina E. Bruck, Kathryn A. Ribbons. Rachel A. Betz. Lori K. Jesberg. Laura K. Wallen, CanieJ. Reetz, Ginger L T< ures 1 
Mary C. Baran, Tricia N. Lamb. Fifth Row: Jenni R. Myers, P. Rachel Mares, Deborah S. Williams. Kim J. Huth. Charlotte L. Majure. Christina Mantis Kathj V Morris, Laura L. Boguschl 
Michelle L. Brown, Joanne M. Kern. Stephanie D. Ecklund. Lana M. Vance. Jennifer L. Paletti. Sixth Row: Jennifer M. Drost. Carrie A. Harvey, Caitlin M. Farney. Jennifer A Beyers. Juditi 
M. Cookis, Dawn E. Girardi, Catherine Meyer, Amy S. Dykstra. Mary P. slunahan. Noreen P. Vaid. Seventh Row: Linella H. Lim. Wendy A. Rogowski. Chrystyna M Eliashevsky, Cvnthi. 
M. Moy. Left Side; Alisa A. Kohl, Melanie B. Ernsting-Gargano, Amy K. Brell. Jennifer C. Karrson, Christy S. Quillin, Laurel A. Dintelmann. Manso S Shah, Nikki M Austin Mary L 
Speck, Denise E, Beegun, Kristen E. Zage, Christine T. Piatek. Anna L. Tilley. Right Side: Meredith E. Babiarez, Holly A. Menshek, Gemma A. Wall, Christine P Mikel, Am\ I Mike] 
Jennifer A. Davis, Tracy L. Butcher, Julia A. Laudeman, Delane A. Heldt. Barbara J. DeChristopher. Jennifer J. Reinhart. Kalherine Pagakis. Molly P- StL-rreti. Kelly L. Gehrke. 



■.■■■■■■■*'■■■■■■ 




Chapter Name 

Alpha Omicron Pi 

Nickname 

A O Pis 

Chapter Colors 

Cardinal Red & White 

Symbol 

Jaqueminot Rose 

Chapter Flower 
Jaqueminot Rose 

Philanthropy 

Arthritis Research 

Foundation 

Address 

706 S. Mathews 







Seniors: Front Row: Stephanie Ecklund, Kathy Morris, Melanie Gargano, Chrissie Mikel. Second Row: Linella Lim. Christina Mantis. Amy Mikel. Joanne Kem. Mona Hernandez. Chri 
Pelletier. Alisa Kohl. Third Row: Noreen Vaid, Emily Downes, Stephanie Alsberg, Anna Tilley, Katie Farney. Jen Beyers. Kim May. Not Pictured: Deb Williams, Amy Brell. Jen Kan 
Laurel Dintelman, Christie Quilin. Laura Bogusch, Jenni Myers. 





Chapter Name 

Alpha Tau Omega 

Nickname 

ATOs 

Chapter Colors 

Blue & Gold 

Symbol 

Castle 

Chapter Flower 

White Tea Rose 

Philanthropy 

Fall Classic for Josh 

Gotteil's Lymphoma 

Research Fund 

Address 

1101 W. Pennsylvania 



■ 



Seniors: Front Row: Matt Huston, Jeff Thompson, Joe McDonald, Keith Cunnigham, Scott McClung, Ryan Roth, Daren Hull. Second Row: T.J, Tomlinson, Scott Augustine, Joel Hercik, 
Matt Williams, Doug Kennebeck, Jeff Melinder, Brett Wolters, George Kenessey, Casey Watrous, Tim Davey. Third Row: Scott Keegan, Tim Schaberg, Eric Heifer, Kevin Marston, Brian 
Bell. Dave Krug, Craig Davis, Adam Vanek, Paul Dioguardi, Dave Drinan. 








Alpha Tau Omega. Front Row: Adam Venek, Daren Hull, Eric Heifer, Ryan Roth, T.J. Tomlinson, Thomas Bentle, Paul Dioguardi, Kevin Marston, Scott Augustine, Brian Bell, . 
Hercik, Dave Krug. Brett Wolters, Doug Kennebeck, George Kenessey, Matt Huston, Scott McClung, Jeff Melinder, Tim Schaberg, Kyle Tate, Cheuck Stanke, Dave Drinan. Second Row: 
Chris Callahan, Dave Ditmars, Greg Rose, Matt MacLean, Jeff Chou, Scott Brakenridge, Craig Carmichael, Drew Raucci, Dan Frank, Andrew Mac Inryre, Pat Martin, Ryan Yagoda, Matt 
Massucci, Greg Swedo, Chris Crawford, Andy Nedzel, Chan Lim, Dan Vanderweit, John Bucklar, Jeff Torres, Marshall Farnum, Corey Kotowski, Christian Ramaker, Andrew Kern. Third 
Row: Thomas Clark, John Vlahavas, Mark Phillip, Jason Muncy, Kevin Fleck, Chris Ernst, Chris Kenessey, Dave Duensing. Fourth Row: Tyler Simpson, Greg Foster, Brandon Peele, 
Jason Richmond, Francis Hollweck. Scott Persin, Steve Currey, Tony Perkins, Steve Spychalski, Andrew Cashman, Eric Handley, Brian Seeger Welch. Matt Foxx, Jason Stanczyk, Andrew 
Compratt. Jason Hall, Drew Parks. Fifth Row: Chris Moran, Tom Palkon, Jeremy Rumps, Glen Kosowski, Tim Cochran, John Barrientes. 



243 




Alpha Chi Omega: I irM Row: K.Ware, S.Taylor, M. Gray, H. Schlaffer, M. Ranquist. Second Row: D. Heedum, S Frank. T. Fadden, B. Brennan. P. Yyas. Third Row A An.-pjch. 
M.Lucie, A. Rodriguez, J. Cieslak, T.Johnson, R. Bloch, M. Russo. Fourth Row: J, Kalivas, L. Harty, J, Sinak. C. Anderson, J. Fenoglio, A. McCarter. |. Botica, V, Thurmond, B. 
Linkhart, G. Valentini, S.Hirsch. MJaconetti, S. Perri, G.Zawodniak, A. Garceau, B. Desmond.J. Hanna, J. Heedum. M. Killian. I. Mayer, C. Siller. K. Simnett. C. Carbine. 1 Johnson, 
C. Dewitt, N. Faigen. Fifth Row: S.Jones. C. Evans, M. Nudo, E. Doyle, H. O'Brien, K.Gallagher. L. Onik. J. Gault. N. Szajer, S. Busen, A. Ganision, S. Becker E Kyro K Bright 
S. Sullivan, A. Roach, M.Worman. E. Chin. A. Brunetle, T. Soroghan. L. Wolff. A. Peterson, B. Naatz. K. Caprio, A. Goodnow. K. Armstrong. Sixth Row: s k\n>v M Pipnone. 
B. Welch, T. LaCrosse, L. Byers, M. Humay, B. Stanley, M. Welsch. K. Morrison. K. McMahon. I. Barch, C. Janacek, S. Barnes, M. Guleserian, s Hardy. M. Finn. K. Johnson, M. 
McCorquodale, K. Kurth, S. Arndt,J. Dorighi, T, Gulley. A. Growney, E. McDearmon, B. Henningsen, K. Musgrave. C. Roitstein.J. Latshaw. C. Pasquesi. L. Mangano, J. Behrame 
Seventh Row: S. McClowry, K. Kurban, G. Boens, K. Lies. A. Herman, V. Sundquist, R. Sanderson. Eighth Row: J. Rebman. M. Murphy, A. Tilly. N. Kyros. M. Shaheen, C, Ranquist. 
Ninth Row: K.Fote. T. Smith. C. Rutledge, B. Nelson, T. Deal. J. Brinkman. A. Caldwell, A. Kendeigh. K. Shoemaker. C. Botica. K. Sugent, B. M.msk\ Tenth Row S Hell ( Baddick. 
H. Leinbach, C. Eggerichs, E. Pincus. K. Halligan. W Hill. 









Chapter Name 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Nickname 

Alpha Chis 

Chapter Colors 

Scarlet Red & Olive 

Green 

Symbol 

Golden Lyre 

Chapter Flower 

Red Carnation 

Philanthropy 

Easter Seals 

Address 
904 S. Lincoln 








Alpha Phi: First Row: M. Mead, C. Danko, J. Braun, K. Stembridge, D. Craven, J. Johnston, J. Harris, R. Ovcina, D. Burrell, J. Mocek, D. Peabody, C. Fallek, P. Chang, C. Trella, A. 
Gonzalez. B. Carlson, M. Gaziano. Second Row: S. Stennet, L. Grabowski, K.Johnson, J. Huskey, J. Grass, B. MacDonald, D. Benedetto, A. McCarty, G. Sinclair. Third Row: A. Pearson, 
C. Tablis, K. Lesters, J. Froehlich, D. Eisner. L. Stengel, C. Caughey, K. Fisher, J. Weiner, S. Hatfield, M. Meyer, N. Davenport. Fourth Row: S. Kelley, T. Lefler, M. Stevenson, A. Miller, 
K. Gomez, M. Dunn, K. Harenza, C. Justin, L. Pauly, K. Zakrzewski. S. Drews, J. Stehman, K. Felver, M. Osheff, S. Sipes, E. Bavougian, S. Goldman, A. Ton, B. Hahn, J. Brewer, J. 
Williams M. Manning, A. Nommensen. Fifth Row: J. Pesce, D. Gleich, K. Burns, E. Heine, A. Robinson, A. Vogt. L. Samson S. Oh, L.McGivern, D. Sipes, J.Newman, G. Zarcone, K. 
Axe. Sixth Row: K. Peldiak, C. Rump, H. Hulina, B. Pedersen, C. ConnellJ. Daley, C. Alexander, M. Schultz, S. Koch, J. Warner, L. Debatin, L. Gray, A. Kesman. Seventh Row: K. Swigart, 
M. O'Conner, K.Fleming, K. Parsons, E. McGuire, E. Pearson, M. Edidin, A. Keller, A. Vlasak, A. Begor. R. Dockery, J. Tate, T. Haye, M. Kerr, A. Sellenberg, J. Casner. Eighth Row: 
M. Savarino, J. Martin, D. Hoss, A. Drake, L. Adams, A. Stolpa, J. Lonze, D. Rich, S. Brame, L. Launer, A. Peck, J. Brodrueck, J. Rader, D. Steinkamp, S. Huffman, J. Patterson, A. Brenner, 
R. Hearity, E. Truty, M. Curvey. B. Miglin, K. Southerland, M. Lufkin, A. Osheff, L. Garibay, B. Cuningham, B. Underwood. 



Greeks 245 




I 





4 



Ka\ 



ff 



Chapter Name 

Beta Theta Pi 

Nickname 

Betas 

Chapter Colors 

Pink & Blue 

Symbol 

Dragon 

Chapter Flower 

Red Rose 

Philanthropy 

Greek Olympics 

Address 

202 E. Daniel 



Beta Theta Pi: First Row: Drew Atkinson, Ryan Overtoom, Jeff Azuse, Paul Spilotro, Frank Gattone, Mark Kushemba. Jim Kunci, Dan Sullivan, Jon S( hlossberg, Eri( < >lsen John 
Richardson, Ryan Stagg, Tony Robert. Second Row: Lou Phillips. Brian Brennan. Mike Vogel, Don Ross, Jason ' howderoski, Tim Kiley, Matt Schmitt, Bryan Chung, Chris < • < mzali 
Anton Engelmann. Third Row: Charlie Hanness. Ryan Scovilk- Brian Moran. Dan Casey, B.J. Cries. Josh Bowler, Dan 1 leuter. Doug Ross. Shane Kern. Mike Loehrke, Shawn I arolan 
Sullyman, Dirilten, Ryan Esko, Jim Nygaard, matt Minnerick, Craig Wunderlich, Rob Sprague. PJ. Macri, Matl Branom. Pat Kernan. Brian Lanucha. Fourth Row: Roman Fbel. Derek 
Briggs, Dave Hong, Jim Passarelli, Dave Tunstal, Mundo Cruz, Brian Boeticher. Craig Doberstein. Mark Huske. Gus Koutsavous. 




Beta Theta Pi Seniors: First Row: Roman Ebert, Derek Brigs, Dave Hong, Jim Passarelli, Dave Tunstal, Mundo Cruz. Brian Boettcher. Craig Doberstein. Mark Huske. Gus Koul 
Second Row: Rob Stark, Simon Breuer. Barret Schultz, Doug Sawyer, Adam Weil, Dave Werba, Dan Smith, Bryan Min, Grady Olsen. Paul Bartolai. Doug Baker. 



246 Greeks 





Chapter Name 
Gamma Phi Beta 
Nickname 
Gamma Phis 
Chapter Colors 
Navy Blue & 
Kelly Green 
Symbol 
Crescent Moon 
Chapter Flower- 
Pink Carnation 
Philanthropy 
Camps for 
Underprivileged Girls 
Address 
1110W. Nevada 



iamma Phi Beta: First Row: K. Kessler, J.Stephens.L. Borowski, T.Wilson, M. Obenauf, N. Robinson. Second Row: T. Kenline, K. Buckert, E. Johnson, S. Brown, R. Tran, V. Alex, 
.. Wagner, K. Rhyne, L. Cerny, C. Roach, S. Ward, R. Stein. Third Row: J. Wolfersberger, K. Gubbins, H. Huckstorf, U. Brockhurst, S. Chase, G. Marti, J. Ellis, L. Carlson, K. Burde, 
. Poss, R. Nurkiewicz, A. Nunamaker, C. Key, T. Perry, K. Harker. Fourth Row: L. Nelson, J. Clapper, A. McGinnis, N. Kulp, K. Jochum, J. Gilroy, M. LaPorta, A. Native, S. Ebert. 
. Campion, C. Crews, K. Martin, A. McDaniel, C. Thompson. Fifth Row: S. Stoltz, V. Fan, J. Pass, J. Klein, A. Starr, J. Doughney, B. Medina, L. Barnes, J. Alberici, M. Hodgson, L. 
town, C. Whitelock, J. Goodman, K. Zimnicki. Sixth Row: S. Weiss, J. Rahn, S. Katsaros, L. chambers, B. Batten, I. Lebo, T. Carlson, K. Murphy, K. Dries, L. Lechowicz, S. Derdzinski. 
.. Brandi.J. Flynn, Seventh Row: G. Kapsimalis, T. JohnsJ. Heiberger, M. Hoffert, D. Deopere, S. Supato, E. Melnick, B. DuClos, K. Lundberg, S. Beil, S. WilsonJ. Foster, R. Haremza. 
:. Crawford. Eighth Row: M. Alex, M. hulting, M. Dooley, L. Ray, S. Fischer, S. Strothof, K. DeMello, W. DuClos, M. Lambe, K. Eby, S. Mathews, S. Camper, J. Carmichael, C. Cottom, 
:. Klebba, B. Puccini, N. Stec, D. Blume, M. Matthys. 




Greeks 247 





Dee Gees show they care 

Delta Gamma prides itself on its community service. This 
year, Dee Gees participated in local community service 
projects in addition to their national philanthropy. Founda- 
tion Fund Days and Foundation Fund Nights were a new 
addition to the activities of Delta Gamma this year, and 
they consisted of various local projects on every Tuesday 
night and three Saturdays out of each semester. On the 
Tuesday nights, members of Dee Gees visited the elderly in 
nursing homes, bringing them gifts of paper flowers. They 
made yarn pictures for blind children and they played 
games with 
the Don Moyer 
Club. For their 
events, Dee 
participated in 
project for 
County. They 
for the nature 
distributed 
around cam- 
betic eye dis- 
Gamma also 
effort into its 
lanthropy. It 
Anchorsplash. 
the most sue- 
widely known 
pies at the U 
Spring, Dee 
this swim con- 
they invite all 
ties to join all 
ties on campus 
This competi- 
of "serious" 
as "fun" re- 
a race where 
tors wear 
On theThurs- 
before the 




Chapter Name 

Delta Gamma 

Nickname 

Dee Gees 

Chapter Colors 

Bronze, Pink & Blue 

Symbol 

Anchor 

Chapter Flower 

Cream-colored Rose 

Philanthropy 

Sight Conservation & 

Aid to the Blind 

Address 
1207 W. Nevada 



children from 
Boys and Girls 
Saturday 
Gees have 
a recycling 
Champaign 
planted trees 
center and 
pamphlets 
pus on dia- 
orders. Delta 
puts a lot of 
National Phi- 
is called 
This is one of 
cessful and 
philanthro- 
of I. In the 
Gees holds 
test, and then 
of the sorori- 
the fraterni- 
to participate, 
tion consists 
relays as well 
lays, such as 
the competi- 
sweatshirts. 
day evening 
competition, 



Dee Gees holds a popular Mr. & Mrs. Anchorsplash 
contest and a lip synch competition. They also charge 
admission to each of these events, and the money raised 
from these ticket sales, along with the money raised 
from selling Anchorsplash T-shirts goes to the Sight 
Conservation and Aid to the Blind. Delta Gamma also held 
workshops throughout the year on issues ranging from 
alcohol awareness, rape awareness and AIDS and STD 
awareness. 



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Delta Gamma: N. Chapman. K. Garfield, D. Michalczyk, K. Vecchio, L. Gagliano, S. Holm, J. Hoobler.J. Roush. K. Hyett, C. Sitz. R. Hendricksen, K. Stumper, M. CollirLs, C. Benedict, H. Bausell, J. Stump. 
Second Row: K. Nelson, C. Haggerty, E. Allison, L. Krajecki, S. Svenson, S. Delia, K. Carlson, J. Cavey, M. Lively, S. Rodgers, C. Downs, E. McCabe. T. Ekl. Third Row: N. Wiwat, L Irwin, K. Habishon, 
A. Long, J. Williams, T. Moore, N. Sansone, K. Lubawski, S. Powers, K. Brest, Van Kempen, N. Romano, J. Chemy, M. McGrath, V. Vitallo. Fourth Row: E. Oh, Y. Jacala, M. Giannasi, T. Mueller, K. Barry, 

A. Quinn, K. Morschauser, A. Pawone, N. Eigner, R. Plammang, T, Mendez, M. Sheckler, M. Ludvicksen. Fifth Row: E. Osborne, M. Novello, B. Unes, A. Trortier, C. Davis, K. Lierman. K. Kramer, J. Nowak, 
L Perz, M. Kalstrom, L. Walsh, K. McKaughlin, B.Jones. S. Gurney, E. Solan, J. Doud, S. Sands, S.Ulbrich. Sixth Row: A. Kane, L. Blohm.J. Rath. R. Guenther, L. Bartlett.J. Mumaw, K. Heyen, A. Goetz, 

B. Howlett. K.Holliday, C. Ebmeier, A. Tracy, S. Russell, J. Schaefer. J. Johnson. J. Gomric, J. Mulhern, C. Munson, S. Hendricks, C. Freese, A. Hendricks, E. Scott, N. Conroy, T. Longoria. S. Kamp. Seventh 
Row: T. Kane, K. Frank, N. Nebel, S. Stein. J. Greenman, K. Krueger, K. Reid, E. Hutton. M. Youngblood, C. Capronigri, B. Flynn, B. Bending, L. Seilheimer, J. Rimar, L. Collins. T. Taubken. C. Aitken, 
A. Zakos, C. Garrett. E. Thompson, S. Norem. J. Curio, T. Veluz, B, Hassell, G. Austgen, S. Smudrick, M, Angio, N. Withrow, K. Hackett, H. Fenley. C. Ruta. M. Ochoco. S. Condon. S. Wackerlin, T. Paolella. 




Delta Gamma Seniors: Front Row: J. Flynn, K. 
Frank, J. Mumaw, T. Kane, L. Sikorski, C. Messina, T. 
Mueller. Second Row: S. Sands, N. EignerJ. Greenman, 
K. Holliday. J. Wold, C. Caponigri. Third Row: I. 
Sloan, J. Rath, L. Bartlett, H. Berman, M. Novello, K. 
Bolt. Fourth Row: R.Guenrher, M. Giannasi, K. Peid, 
C. Ruta, K. McLaughlin, E. Osborne, S. Gurney, E. Oh, 
B. Unes, K. Heyen. 



Greeks 249 




Delta Zeta: First Row: Debbie Bonus, DaniellaSantoro, Jill Landers, Kim Shurman, Amy Wagner, Rhonda Brouwer, Stacey Rose, Lisa Kloosterman, Linda Merritt, Gina Schwartz, Melii 
Ohlquist, Mary Anne Beckwitt, Valerie Pheiffer. Second Row: Christy Urenajen McKiernan, Tricia Walsh, Beth Daily. Angie Robinson. Kim Priest. Dana Kaiser. Tracy Kavaliauskas. 
Julie Goetsch, Michele Kushner, Katherine Simmers, Nadia Fl-Barb arawi, Tracy Gavzer, Yvette O'Mara, Beth Hammes, Adrienne Ball, Nicole Baranski, Amanda Davis. Gretchen But her. 
Jen Kleinschmidt, M. Iovenelli, Becky Kozdron, Andrea Park. Third Row: Karin Ostling, Michelle Grasso, Mandy Durkin, Charlene Sison, Jean Proehaska. Beth Czajkowski, Rebecca 
Milligan. Jen Carlson, Kristin Ward, Amy Gonzalez, Joey Papa, Elise Silivay, Colleen Walsh, Megan Farrell, Jessica Balch. Anne Robison, Gretchen Waltenbaugh, Leslie Warden. Renc-e 
Robak, Shawnna Robert, Kari Anderson, Kendra Bolton, Carrie Glaser, Peggy Uchanski. Fourth Row: Mary Jane Potthoff, Kathy Olson. Katie McKenzie, Gina By rd, Julie Zackarj ( I iris 
Michonski, Sue Pruski, Rachel Strezlinski, Robin Luberda, Shellean Berry, Jodi Altenbaumer. Sarah Lucas, Carey Estell, Stephanie Luehr, Valerie Butcher. Missy spun Natalie Ranch 
Fifth Row: Melissa Conroy, Michelle Kesterke, Donna Colter, Laura Ziech, Pauline Pakla, Karen Scheeler, Ann Schmitz, Karin Novotny, Michelle Jaeger Seema c ha ndarana. Carrie Arends. 
Chrissie Fricker, Betsy Fisk, Jen Pinto, Shannon Murphy, Melissa Grant, Monica Soltesz, Monica Marcotte. Sixth Row: Amy O'Brien, Colleen Lewis, Aveen MacEntee, Emma Ma< Laren 
KristenLundeen, Jen Enger, KristenRakoski, Sandy Smilgius, Keri Raffanti, Yvette Loayza, Lecia Imbery, Carrie Gilbert, Juliann Gray, Mary Beth k.nisv T< mya Buhrman. Laura Meredith, 
Kacey Gates, Joli Shaw, Michelle Swanson, Andi Osborne, Jen Teadt, 




II 



Chapter Name 

Delta Zeta 

Nickname 

Dee Zees 

Chapter Colors 

Old Rose & 

Vieux Green 

Symbol 

Turtle 

Chapter Flower 

Killarney Rose 

Philanthropy 

Speech & Hearing 

Impaired, Galludet 

University 

Address 
710 W. Ohio 




Delta Zeta Seniors: First Row: Emma MacLaren. Monica Marcotte, Carrie Gilbert. Kristen Rakoski. Second Row: Yvette Loayza. Shannon Murphy, Joli Shaw. Sjlma 
Ansari. Melissa Conroy, Andrea Park. Third Row: Lecia Imbery, Aveen MacEntee. Kathy Olson. Jen Teadt. Amy Doehring. Michelle Swanson, SanJv Smilgius, Monica 
Soltesz, Julie Ohlson, Amy O'Brien Not Pictured: Portia Balch, Tonya Buhrman, Kalene Caffarella, Meg Caponigri, Dina Elijah. Kacey Gates. Mary Beth Kau-v Andi 
Osborne, Gina Pogue, Keri Raffanti. 



reeks 





Chapter Name 

Delta Tau Delta 

Chapter Nickname 

Delts 

Chapter Colors 

Purple & Gold 

Chapter Flower 

Purple Iris 

Philanthropy 

"Delt Touney"Flag 

Football Tournament 

Address 

713 W. Ohio 




eltaTau Delta: First Row: Jason Mann, Ryan Keiser, Albert Pohl, John Pesche, Brandon Rogalski, Heath Belva, Andy Hull, Per Faivre, Clayton Ruhle, Bill Sullivan, Ryan Walsh, Robb 
odvarcka, Sean Loftis, Cory Overstreet, Van Parihk. Paul Wilkowski, Evan Newhouse, Bill Debb. Second Row: Dave Thieme. Mike Counte, Chris Welch. Jeff Lamont, Kevin Eggan, 
ave Gargas, Scott Ross, Allen Layne, Chad Warner, Mark Kowalczyk. Third Row: Max Rouse, Tom Hackett, Salem Muribi, Mike Borelli, Mike Stuart, Nelson Reyes, Ben McKenna, 
'ill Hemsworth, Mark Basak, Justin McGrary, Jason Leavitt, Diego Bullon, Carl Carcerano, Fred Hackmann, Jeevan Subbiah, Mark Bolsoni, Ryan Burke, Chad Korte, Chris Sanchez, 
ark Speyer, Mike Grubb, Scott Beach, Cory Nehls. Fourth Row: Eric Tarusievich, Jason Bonick, Brian Debatin, Matt Schrimpf, Scott Tilles, Mike Flood, Jon Blair, John Kinstler, Dave 
eservey, Eddie Chang, Pat McEniry, Mike Newell, Matt Graham, Scott Arends, John Nail. Tim Mulcahey, Joe Rossi. 



Greeks 251 





Chapter Name 

Delta Chi 

Nickname 

D Chis 

Colors 

Red & Buff 

Flower 

White Carnation 

Philanthropy 

Flag Football with 

Sororities 

Address 

1111 S. First 




Delta Chi Seniors 




Farmhouse: First Row: John Blackford, Derek Busboom, Matt Wilcox, Mike Boston, Darren Havens, Carey Harbison, Chad Sprague, Dan Gudeman, Andy Bartlow. Second Row: 
Matt Hennenfent, Andy Builta, Chad Sager, Josh Rhodes, Ben Hawkinson, Brian Conner, Nathan Rosczyk, Brent Sulzberger, Gary Sierens, Dan Parker, Mathew Knight, Brian King. 
Third Row: Brian Rolf, Ryan Potts, Brad Krusa, Mike Shane, Dan Sprecher, Mike Huber. Fourth Row: Jason Smith, John Hawkens, Tom Conklin, Joe Springer, Jeremy Edwards, Zach 
Belton, Mark Garwood, Mark Robinson, Mark Watters. Fifth Row: Joe Webel, Roy Robinson, Eric Carlson, Chad Hensley, Wade Pollitt, Phil Heisner, Lyle Busboom, Aaron Wilken, 
Aaron Bartlow, Craig Sims, Tim Mies. Sixth Row: Matt Lloyd, Matt Helms, Eric Croft, Brian Lehn, Mitch Pray, Aaron Perkinson, Bill Bodine, Brent Hardesty, Rhett Farrell, Tim Peters, 
Andy Riggens. Ben Erickson. 





Cooperative Living 



HHHH, or Four-H is a very unique sorority at the U of I 
because it is a cooperative house. This means that they are 
self-sufficient, in that they do all of their own cooking and 
cleaning. These are duties that each member has to fulfill, 
with the number of duties decreasing with seniority. Four- 
H is also unique in that all of the members are required to 
have participated in at least five years of Four-H Club. This 
club is for youths, ages 8 to eighteen, and the members 
participate in projects in areas ranging from computer 
science, to cooking, and they exhibit their projects at the 



county fair, 
ity uses the 
their mem- 
through their 
riences with 
This common 
allows each 
Four-H to be 
on their sis- 
job done. Al- 
are a very 
Four-H also 
activities that 
the other 
campus. One 
is community 
year, they 
drive after 
with the Agri- 
Mechaniza- 
They had a 
Agriculture 
they asked 
donate all of 
ter clothes, 
from this drive 
Empty Tomb, 
tributed the 
various local 





Chapter Name 

4-H House 

Nickname 

4-House or Etas 

Chapter Colors 

Green & White 

Symbol 

White Pearl 

Chapter Flower 

Wliite Rose & Sweet Pea 

Philanthmpy 

Numerous Local 

Organizations 

Address 

805 W. Ohio 



Four-H soror- 
discipline that 
bers learned 
various expe- 
Four-H Club, 
background 
member of 
able to count 
terstogetthe 
though they 
unique house, 
participates in 
are similar to 
houses on 
such activity 
service. This 
held a sweater 
Thanksgiving 
cultural 
tion Club, 
booth on the 
campus, and 
students to 
their old win- 
The proceeds 
went to the 
who then dis- 
clothes to 
charities. The 



women of Four-H also had a Haunted House at Lincoln mall 
to raise money for the Josh Gottheil Memorial Fund. Four- 
H focused on social awareness this year, and they had 
several workshops on acquaintance rape. For one of these 
workshops, the women of Four-H watched a video with the 
men of Theta Chi, and then had a discussion about this 
issue. Other workshops that were held throughout the year 
focused on resume writing and body images. Four-H had an 
active social year. One of their most unusual social events 
was their Breakfast Bash, a party that they held before 
finals first semester. This party took place at R&R's Sports 
Bar, and fifteen houses were invited to participate. 






i' 



4-H House: First Row: Lora Webster, Judy Schumacher, Molly Enger, Shelly Taft, Holly Hinclerliter, Lynn Eyman, Michelle Adams, Carrie Walker, Genefer Brashear, Jessica Fehrenbacher. 
Second Row: Rachel Strode, Julie Drach, Christi Schweitzer, Jennifer Wilcoxson, Renee Stokes, Julie Brown, Rebecca Norman, Amy Bunselmeyer. Third Row: Jan Croegaert, Jennifer 
Esworthy, Sally Springer, Leslie Seelow, Amy Gahlbeck, Nancy Hall, Sarah Potter, Julie Bohle. Fourth Row: Janelle Lehmann, Jane Bickelhaupt, Bethany Corbett, Annette Cole, Suzanne 
Mueller, Julie Frederick, Karen Corrigan. Fifth Row: Meg Webster, Becky Brown, Katy Stokes, Tracy Boe, Debbie Hanson, Angela Moore, Lori Meeker, Kelli Lynch. Sixth Row: Lori Allaman, 
Kim Hetzer, Jennifer Welsh, Michelle Aggert, Sharolyn Flamm, Krista Barkley, Lisa Storm, Gayle Jones. Seventh Row: Darcy Lamoreaux, Sheila Heide, Becky Parkinson, Keena 
Baumgartner, Becky Hollis, Mindy Elvidge, Cindy DeHaan, Sheila Schlipf, Julie Wetzel, Lisa McKee, Carol Huelsrnann, Monica Fidler, Carolyn Fox. Not Pictured: Carrie Burkybile, Anne 
Burkybile, Julie Croegaert, Danelle Larson, Carrie Gehring. 




Fall 1994 Executive Council: First Row: Lori 
Allaman, Jane Bickelhaupt, Becky Hollis, 

Jennifer Welsh. Second Row: Sharolyn Flamm, 
Angela Moore, Mindy Elvidge, Annette Cole, 
Michelle Aggertt. 



Greeks 255 




Thet 



ome more aware 



A new change for Kappa Alpha Theta this year was an 
increased emphasis within their house on social and cultural 
awareness. Alcohol awareness was the main focus for 
increasing social awareness, and they discouraged sub- 
stance abuse with speakers from their Nationals and 
speakers from Student Legal Services who discussed vio- 
lations and consequences of underage drinking. Each of the 
sisters was also encouraged to attend G.A.M.M.A.(Greeks 
Advocating the Mature Management of Alcohol) meetings. 
In order to increase cultural awareness, Thetas participated 
in a dinner with Sigma Lambda Gamma, the first Latina 



sorority at the 
dinner, a rep- 
Sigma 
Gamma spoke 
about their 
their role on 
tas ended the 
giving the 
Sigma 
Gamma a tour 
Kappa Alpha 
to continue 
the future, in 
creasing cul- 
ness and 
good relations 
rorities on 
dition, Thetas 
on scholarship 
They had a 
gram, where 
were matched 
members who 
interests or 
active mem- 
study part- 
also played 
visors, offer- 
to the new 
selecting 
helping them 
demic prob- 
also had an in- 
gram this 




C3=£3=€Z] 










Chapter Name 

Kappa Alpha Tljeta 

Nickname 

Tlietas 

Chapter Colors 

Black and Gold 

Symbol 

Kite and Twin Stars 

Chapter Flower 

Pansy 

Philanthropy 

Court Appointed Special 

Advocates 

Address 

611 E. Daniel 



U of I. At this 
resentative of 
Lambda 
to Thetas 
sorority and 
campus. The- 
evening by 
women of 
Lambda 
of their house. 
Thetas hopes 
this dinner in 
hopes of in- 
tural aware- 
maintaining 
with other so- 
campus.ln ad- 
also focused 
this year, 
mentor pro- 
new members 
up with active 
shared similar 
majors. These 
bers served as 
ners, but they 
the role of ad- 
ing assistance 
members in 
courses and 
with any aca- 
lems. Thetas 
centive pro- 
year, and 



people who received good grades or who attended all of 
their classes in a given week were recognized in chapter. 
Scholarship dinners were also held at the end of each 
semester to recognize those members who received grade 
point averages of 4. 5 and above.The new member program 
was completely changed at the U of I chapter of Kappa 
Alpha Theta this year. Their pledge program was changed 
from a nine week program to a four week program. In 
addition, the new members were permitted to attend 
chapter meetings from the beginning of the year. Thetas 
were given a lot of flexibility from their Nationals in 
changing their pledge program, and they felt that all of the 
hinges made were positive improvements for the house. 





Cap pa Alpha Theta: First Row: J. Mentel, L. Eaton, S. Stach, M. Hobin, J. Hardy, K. Krueger, L. Graham, K. Corrado. Second Row: S. Donahue, J. Supan, A. Wills, C. Tulley, M. Holper, T. 
-chultz, K. Parker, V. Stone, D. Wickizer, S. Frey, J.Hofbauer, M. Ori, J. Ludwig, T. Lynch, K. Pearson, K. Konsoer, J. Harroun, A. Holmes, S. Mendez. Third Row: A. Knapp, J. Nakayama, 
. Rubin, K. Clow, J. Canna, L. McDonald, E, Conner, E. Neuhaus, A. Zanic, B. Richards, D. McClung, N. Brinkman, K. Rosser, K. Pommerenke, J. Woods, J. Myalls, N. Buchanan. Fourth Row: 
5. Schifferdecker, M. Mohamed, L. Bykowski, P. Chavez, K. McMeekin, J. Hindel, C. Durham, L. Hearsley, M. Fitzgibbon, J. Smith, S. Martinez, -K. Shea, C. Gaikowski, A. Falese, P.Lemperis, 
J . Benig, A. Archer, A. Kopec, C. Hansen, C. Newman, A. Hargraves,J. Thurwell, J. Newell. Fifth Row: S. Sanford, K. Kratochvil, R. Wolter, S. Edwards, C. Phillips, K. Carnevale, J. Gorman, 
i. Trinh, J. McBroom, A. Habbley, J. Vogelsang, A. Green, M. Berry, S. Manning. Sixth Row: H. Evans, D. Ander, L, Bilder,.A. Donnelly, L. Hearn, J. Noble, P. Denning, T. Rinker, M. Goodman, 
'.. McCarthy, K. Yacopino, A. Berning, E. Fen, L. Mancini, C. Sienko, T. Guzzino, K. Estacio, M. Brannstorm. Seventh Row: K. King, J, Mockaitis, M. Murphy, A. Andrews, C. Phillips, M. Martain, 
■. Cywinski, S, Mulholland, L. Hazer, M. Chong,J, Stauffacher, B. LaSusa, A. Anthongy, A. Griffin, V. Zvinakis, L. Hill, J. Simmons, T. Drew, D. TeBockhorst, J. Batty. Eighth Row: C. Holmes, 
. Ahrens, J. Crump. C. Gilbert. A. Misiura, D. Bava, D. Berg, C. Econompoulus, P. Richards, J. Palmer, T. Grcevic. 




Cappa Alpha Theta Seniors: First Row: Michelle McMullen, Denise Bava, Tonya Grcevic, Kim Thompson, Chrysoula Economopoulus, Diana TeBockhorst, Penny Richards, Tamara Gammill, 
essica Stauffacher, Carrie Haning, Mary Lin Muscolino, MaryBeth Martin, Jen Crump. Second Row: Dawn Berg, Carissa Holmes, Cassie Phillips, Lori Hazer, Mindy Chong, Beth LaSusa, Andrea 
iriffin. Milly Murphy, Lauren Hill, Jill Ahrens, Aimee Anthony, Alexis Andrews, Jessica Palmer, Trisha Drew, Christine Gilbert, Andrea Misiura, Jen Batty, Lori Crowley. 




Greeks 257 



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Kappa Delta: Second Row; L. Carlson, S. Martinez, K. Smetana, T. Halrerson, C. Logan, K. Staley, S. O Grady, T. Cull. D. Lesak, T. Buffo, A. Geppinger, A. Clarke, L. Erekson, K. Philippi 
J. Winters, T. Gerry, R. Engeln.J. Iskalis, M. Gerrase. Third Row: K. Chidley, J. Maasberg, J. Lores, Kim Randolph, A. Stevenson, k. Pryor, D. Schidt, T. Pilewski, K. Roy. S. Lucas. D 
Cazan, A. Wurster, C. Momon, C. Herbst, J. DeBruin, F. Bruno,J. Casey, A. Dunkel, C. Fesi, T. Theodos, J. Rhodes. Fourth Row: C. Mathieson, S. Gilbertson. C.Jung, A. Malito, M 
MclntyreJ. Kawada, C. Iverson, M. Curtis, J. Levin, N. Romo, M. Yeagle, J. Jones, S. DeFranco, H. Ozcak, K. Clendenin, B. Schoeneberg, A. Gray, J. Korman.J. Otto. S Fittanlo, L. Schad 
T. Harpe, V. Mandzukic, S. Clayton, N. Krohn, H. Koulis, K. Tesdall, M. Dolliger. Fifth Row: K. Abrahamson, B. Brotherton, M. Albertson.J. Hoferle, A. Lavin, M. Mitchell, J. Giacomazzi 
J. Kinny, E, Bowers, K. Roegge, T. Goeddel, S. McLeod, L. Bauman, N. Vavrik, H. Henning, K. Mueller, S. Todd, J. O'Leary, B. Brandt, J. Pick, M. Harry, B. Barengo. A. Carrasco, E 
Kinneman, K. Kalseth. Sixth Row: L. Gorski, L. Ramirez, K. Smetana, A. Garcia, G. Romero, A. Asaro.J. Skodol, M. Breen, A. Miyamoto, E. Naderi, A. Hannus, A. Willets, E Ward K 
Morris, A. hurliman, S. DeMeyer. A. Tesdall, J. Wozniak, A. Pilewski, B. Broms, J. Tang, J. Anderson, A. Zervos, G. Ludwig. 



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Chapter Name 

Kappa Delta 

Nickname 

KDs 

Chapter Colors 

Green & Pearl Wloite 

Symbol 

Dagger 

Chapter Flower 

Wlrite Rose 

Philanthropy 

Committee for the 

Prevention of 

Child Abase 

Address 

1204 S. Lincoln 



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Chapter Name 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Nickname 

Kappas 

Chapter Colors 

Light Blue & 

Dark Blue 

Symbol 

Key 

Chapter Flower 

Fleur de Lis 

Philanthropy 

Rose McGall Fund 

Address 

1102 S. Lincoln 



J' 



Kappa Kappa Gamma Seniors: First Row: Stephanie Haltsenburg, Karen Daly, Angela Foley, Kristy Holcombe. Jen Lung. Second Row: Beth Gschiel, Meggan Fitzgerald, 
Donnely Bohan, Jamie Bukvich. Milena Velez, Niki Aardema, Margie La Chica, Cara Stummer. Third Row: Sally Gschwendtner, Kristin Mac Arthur, Krista Karger, Eileen Baker, 
Doreen Drews, Kathleen Farley. Melissa Olson, Susan Roesch, Jody Harms, Karyn Harms, Sarah Schilling. 




K *** % 



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*i J? M 4* 



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K | 4 V\ j,<\ 



Kappa Kappa Gamma: First Row: A. Poley, L.Rakers, T. Stone, J. White. K. Ekdal, M.Smolinski, T. Boeke, E. Maki, B. Brown, J.Mohr, K. Terstriep, T. Gregar, K. Simpson, A.Flynn, 
T. Marino. Second Row: N. Berg. J. Werner, K. Glastnapp, J. Mulcrone, V. Pasternak, N. Peck, K. Norris, A. Freiman, C.Kraft, A.Blascoe. Third Row: M. Gliwa, K.Schnobel, K. Kowalski, 
S. Bellis, A. Schafer, H. Meloy, D. Stacey, H. Adams, R. Ryan, M. Singley, A. Harvill, G. Busch, S. Ferega, J. White, A. Bruch, R. Palmer, M. Gainer. Fourth Row: L.Welsch, K. Cross, 
H. Gaddey, A. Hysell, N. Lane K. Owens, H. Greenslade, H. Sneddon, M. Morelli, A. Sawyer, L. Summberville, A. Antonilli. T. Gonzalez, C. Polito, K. Mazlowski, J. Bright, A. Ryan, 
J. Capes. P. Booker, H. Klamrzynski, M. Cuvala, K. Dempsey. Fifth Row: J. Sherlock, A. Truckenbrod, A. Frigo, L. Pann, S. Bass, M. French, J. Dunbar, K. Knutson, A. Harms, A. Hook, 
L. Brownell, A. Lundgren, C. Santello, S. Schieffer, E. Nogle, C. Anderson, S. LaswellJ. Mattson, A. Peters, L. Vales, J. Roleing, A. Durkin, L Gray, H. Greenslade, J. Hendrick, J. Piccione, 
B. Blickhan. L. Lewensky. G. Welsch, L. Means, L. Swann, R. Schilling, J. Day, J. Hintz. Sixth Row: M.Olson, K. Holcombe, J. Buckvich, E. Baker, K.Harms, B. Gscheil, K. Baly.J. Lung, 
S. Gschwendtner, D. Bohan, S. Schilling, K. Kallman, S. Halstenberg, J. Flewelling, J. Naffziger, K. Klingel, H. Rastorferd, D. Johnson, J. Kuchniski, J. Fair. C. Fischer. 



Greeks 259 





Chapter Name 

Kappa Sigma 

Nickname 

Kappa Sigs 

Chapter Colors 

Scarlet, Wlrite & 

Emerald Green 

Chapter Flower 

Lily of the Valley 

Philanthropy 

Numerous 

Charities 

Address 

212 E. Daniel 




Kappa Sigma: First Row: K. Bisell, K. Keenan, F. Ferraiolo. T. Lennon, A. Prechtel. Second Row: B. Kelly. A. Moreland. T. Stimiman. R. Bates, M. Sawalha. K. Rosselein, V 
Suckow, K. Nimnicht. Third Row: M. DaValle, K. Akerman, C. Alberts, D. Feucht, M. Menet, M. Baran, M. Mateja, R.Kanabay, R. Lukus. K. Miller. T. Morrone. S. Piekarczyk. 
T. Pena, T. Kantas. G. Antonopoulos, V. Hsu, D. Skilly, P. Zach, J. Barsuk, K. Krueger, R. McGarr. Fourth Row: M. Schlarb. M. Sneyders. C. Sopiarz, R. Garrite. M. Goben. D. 
Gervase, M. Stanley, B. Binder, d. Beckes, M. Wright, B.Jeter, K. Kirby, E. Blair. C. Plemons, K. Henricks, D. Whiston, R. Ossowski. P. Telcampt. M.Hard. R. Artega. L. Fimmen. 
M. Hudspeth. Fifth Row: S. Sands, A. Alalia, B. Sedak. B. Sarkiss, E.Lee, M. Biggs, J. Munro, J. Gustaveson. 





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Sigma Delta Tau: First Row: Julie Lifchitz. Lisa Coleman. Annie Roth, Adela Mizrachi, Kim Prywes, Katie Bernero, Jill Hall, Jenni Abrams, Melissa Kaufman, Amy Schaff, Jodie Pinsky, 
Eleanor Buchman, Missy Marco, Lauren Parmet. Second Row: Stacey Chorney, Debbie Lowtwait, Minda Block, Jillian Randell, Samantha Lazarus, Niki Christopolous, Sara Kahn, Carrie 
Bahrmasel, Marni Brown, Elaine Arber, Mara Gluck, Bari Cottone, Courtney Rottner. Natasha Rosenstock, Marcy Pogofsky, Sara Sabin, Jodie Lezak, Brittany Goldflies. Third Row: Bryna 
Roth, Jamie Bender, Rebecca Zerivitz, Shelby Dorfman, Steffie Pessis, Missy Antokal, Carrie Berman, Alison Shapiro, Robin Goldstein, Megan Roth, Sharon Rosen, Becky Levy, Jamie 
Berman, Kristie Vainikos, Stephanie Waxier, Joni Pearlman, Jennifer Lessman, Marissa Bubey, Anat Steinbery. Fourth Row: Debra Samuels, Leslie Merbaum, Jaime Klein, Bonnie Turek, 
Jill Denenberg, Karyn Miller, Stefanie Langer, Stacy Walter, Missy Singer, Missy Lezak, Joann Reed, Lauren Sherman, Dana Friedman, Alison Talbert, Jen Garson, Francine Keller, Jaime 
Kron, Kim Josephson, Karen Herman, Lisa Opensky, Beth Polisky, Lisa Wittenberg, Laura Merkin. Fifth Row: Kim Gerstein, Jasmin Epstein, Beth Chudnow, Melissa Zeidman, Ilyse 
Epstein, Alison Kite. Rachel Pelta, Denise Kaplan, Julie Nadler, Leticia Vazquez, Robyn Horwitz, Debbie Hammersly, Beth Goldberg, Amy Levinson, Jen Anderson. Sixth Row: Michelle 
Levy. Amy Katz, Renee Lewis, Leslie Portnoy, Rachel Borak, Taryn Lang, Sandi Sprechman, Debbie Horwitz, Lisa Handler, Susan Milsk, Alissa Shandling, Stacy Hitlman, Amanda Zoloto, 
Valerie Cohen, Danielle Hayum, Amy Lurito, Robyn Kaufman, Wendy Rubin, Jen Weil, Leslie Shulman. Michele Mueller, Kathy Jacobson. Seventh Row: Shana Sanders, Anna Steinberg, 
Samantha Cohen, Laura Heller. Regina Shekhtman, Nicole Ruttkay, Lisa Kay. 





Chapter Name 
Sigma Delta Tau 

Nickname 

SDTs or Sig Delts 

Chapter Colors 

Cafe-au-Lait & Old Blue 

Symbol 

Torch 

Chapter Flower 

Yellow Tea Rose 

Philanthropy 

Leukemia 

Address 

1104 W. Nevada 





Sigma Delta Tau Seniors: First Row: Elissa Knopoff. Kimie Levy, Wendy Rubin. Kimberly Bairn, Lori Rosenbaum, Jen Weil, Leslie Shulman, Lisa Wittenberg, Karen Herman. Second 
Row: Julie Liebling, Lisa Opensky, Mindy Kaplansky, Kimber Nussbaum, Rachel Pelta, Kathy Jacobson, Kari Malkjori Drucker, Shari Feldbau, Miriam Cohen, Laura Merkin. Third Row: 
Amy Lurito, Beth Polisky, Michelle Scott, Robyn Kaufman, Danielle Hayum, Michele Mueller. 



Greeks 261 




Sorority Celebrates Centennial 

This year was Pi Beta Phi's centennial, therefore they 
celebrated one hundred years at the U of I with a Founders 
Day Celebration in April. For this celebration, Pi Phi's invited 
all of their alumni to come back to their chapter for a formal 
brunch. In addition, they had activities where alumni from 



the same 
had an oppor- 
together and 
celebrating 
dredth anni- 
U of I, Pi Phi's 
to continue 
involvement 
tional philan- 
rowgames. 
which Oc- 
tober, con- 
events: tug- 
on-three bas- 
ball, and bil- 
the fraterni- 
pus as well 
group of guys 
pressed an in- 
invited to par- 
women of Pi 
the coaches 
participating 
team who en- 
competition 
trance fee, 
money raised 
to Literacy 
mon, which is 
crafts school, 
focused on in- 
awareness 
November, 
nutrition and 
awareness 





Chapter Name 

Pi Beta Phi 

Nickname 

Pi Phis 

Chapter Colors 

Wine & Silver Blue 

Symbol 

Golden Arrow 

Chapter Flower 

Wine Carnation 

Philanthropy 

Links to Literacy & 

Arrowmont 

Address 

1005 South Wright 



pledge class 
tunity to get 
celebrate. In 
their one-hun- 
versary at the 
made a pledge 
their strong 
in their Na- 
thropy, Ar- 
This event, 
curred in (De- 
sisted of four 
of-war, three- 
ketball, soft- 
liards. All of 
ties on cam- 
as any other 
who ex- 

terest were 
ticipate. The 
Beta Phi were 
for each of the 
teams. Each 
tered the 
paid an en- 
and all of the 
went to Links 
and Arrow- 
an arts and 
Pi Beta Phi also 
creasing social 
this year. In 
they held a 
body image 
day, and they 



had speakers come to their house to talk about eating 
disorders and body images. This workshop was con- 
ducted at every Pi Beta Phi chapter across the nation. 
Pi Phi's also participated in a new program this year 
called "Friend to Friend," which focused on drug and 
alcohol awareness. 








Pi Beta Phi: First Row: J. Hecimovich, S. Bishop, M. Heinz. A. Stein, E. Beckman, S. Ozley, S. Guzic, A. Martinez, C. Cantwell, M. West, K. Wolfley, M. Goldstein, S. Dunton, A. Karuschak, 
J. Chalcraff, J. Frank, M. Hazer, C. Miller. Second Row: B. Willi, A. Edwards, C. Lewis, A. Brey, A. Gibson, S. Bell, J. Valbert, B. Nardulli, H. Chapman, K, Jansen, A. Pihos, E. Teelucksingh, 
M. Luby, A. Moore, E. Hills, B. Troesken, R. Dietzler. Third Row: J. West, L. Kawczynski, C. Anderson, A. Caywood,J. Larsen,J. Anderson, C. Andreas-Hobin, M. Mueller, A. Toth, E. Bishop, 
J. Reid, Z. Nomanbhoy, E. Bell. M. Baksay, M. Feehey, J. Gura, J. Quinlan, L. Amerin, B. Frese. S. Klimes, J. Coutant, B. Kelly. Fourth Row: T. McGill, A. Burns, N. Kidd, M. Sehy, S, Miller, 
K. Hudson, R. Roberts, J. Pursley, N. Words, C. Minor, A. Garavaglia, L. Silver, V. Nichols, D. Spataro,J. Harmon, C. Blythe, N. Vlazny, S. Bambule, S. Lindberg, A. Garritano, J. Kearney, K. 
Rojahn, A. Lee. Fifth Row: D. McLaughlin. B. Hinchey, W. Haaland, M. Hickey, A. Cook, A. Gibson, C, Parr, L. Lindsay, K. Madoch, J. Puryear, J. Homan, K. Treseler, S. Chung, S. Curson, 
A. Russell. L. Hawkinson, J. Radovich. W. Reutebuch, B. Magee. K. Winker, L. Gerleman, A. Flowers. 




Greeks 263 



^ 



i; 




Sigma Kappa Increases Giving 

Sigma Kappa grew as a sorority this year by increasing their 
involvement in community service and adding emphasis to 
their scholarship within their house. To raise money for 
their philanthropy, which is Gerontology and Alzheimer's 
Disease, Sigma Kappa had a Week of Giving in the Fall. 
During this week, Sigma Kappa helped their philanthropy, 
aided in inter-sorority relations, and celebrated their own 
house. For their philanthropy, they visited the Garwood 



Home, a local 
where they 
the residents 
them cookies, 
a lollipop sale 
to raise 

Alzheimer's 
ing the slogan 
Alzheimer's 
Sigma Kappa 
helping other 
ropies during 
They visited 
Moyers Boys 
To improve in- 
relations, 
sent balloons 
all of the so- 
campus. They 
ebrated their 
with a tradi- 
their house. In 
this tradition 
Giving, Sigma 
also active 
Ties this year, 
gram started 
at the U of I, 
opmentally 
viduals have 
nity to inter- 
form mutual 
with college 




Chapter Name 

Sigma Kappa 

Nickname 

Sig Kaps 

Chapter Colors 

Lavendar & Maroon 

Symbol 

Heart and Dove 

Chapter Flower 

Violet 

Philanthropy 

Alzheimer's Disease 

Address 

303 E. John 



nursing home, 
talked with 
and brought 
They also held 
on the Quad 
money for 
research, us- 
"Help Lick 
Disease." 
focused on 
p h i I a n t h - 
this week, 
the Don 

and Girls Club, 
ter-sorority 
Sigma Kappa 
and candy to 
rorities on 
also eel- 
Founder's Day 
tional ritual in 
addition to 
of a Week of 
Kappa was 
with Natural 
This is a pro- 
two years ago 
where devel- 
disabled indi- 
the opportu- 
act with and 
friendships 
students. The 



women of Sigma Kappa included their "Tie" in many of the 
activities that Sigma Kappa held throughout the year. In 
addition to focusing on their philanthropy, Sigma Kappa 
emphasized scholastics this year. They encouraged 
their members to strive for higher grades by holding 
competitions within the house. The house was divided 
into two sections, and the sisters competed for the 
most As and Bs. 









Sigma Kappa: Joanne Pazderski, Amy Gauger, Lisa Draganchuk, Julie Grena, Theresa Boian, Susan Hackett, Kelly Kohlbacher, Carrie Keane, Jen Luberda, Heather Davis, Amie Megginson, Jen 
Renner, Heather Norris, Jen Gleich, Angie Haacke, Jen Obalil, Terri Aung-Myint, Maureen Dore, Emily Coombe, Jodi Kaminecki, Brenda Lattanzio, Becky Petrinos, Julie Jakala, Sandy An, Kristen 
Stagle, Jen Nuestro, Naomi Nakayama, Cori Wolfe, Tracy Victorine, Alicia Studinski, Tan Weicherding, Tiernnee Jefferis, Darci Stadler, Sarah Ellington, Ann Marie Quinn, Helen Chou, Christine 
Werlein, Amy Williams, Keri Karter, Tricia Dzan, Lisa Jaeschke, Staci Burton, Jen Schmitt, Julie Chan, Jody Fabbre, Jeni Fox, Carmen Leon, Allison Schneider, Susan Sim, Kristin Voris, Jen Rice, 
Rachel Messinger, Erica Karolewski, Kelly Stamm, Tiffany Vandervelde, Rachel Gregg, Shari Kahn, Sarah Rexroat, Bridget Greely, Tracy Vizza, Jen Morrell, Jen Hawkins, Amanda Rahn, Jen Klein, 
(en Cox, Tanya Brooks, Elaine Hondros, Jo-El Lacy, Jen Dendrinos, Erin Naughton, Natasza Kozalzynski, Cindy Dollman, Christa Ensminger, Michelle Venegas, Carolyn Pershke, Mylinda Schlesinger, 
Rebecca Pontarelli,JoAnna Rolfs, Kathy Carlson, Jeanne Reiter, Bridgette DeLeon, Linda Mulrooneyjen VanWinkle, Lori Biangini, Wendy Willoughby, Nancy Janowiak, Shelley Friesz, Erin Macko, 
Diana Chang, Vicki Dabler, Cherie Fetro, Amy Anderson, Susan Weaver, Katie Tobin, June Matilla, Tammy Hawkins, Dana Mavros, Laura McCarthy, Mitun Gupta, Jessica Matthews, Karen Hroma, 
Doris Koh, Theresa Robinson, Jen Hayes, Mayure Jayaram, Kristi Page. 




Greeks 265 





Sigma Chi: First Row: Tom Mulrey, Jim Escobar, Mark Lehmkuhl. Jeff Schonhoff, John Pelletiere. Brian Purl, Seth Weiss, Ryan Brown. Second Row: Case Pudik, Dan Bolda, Ri iger 
Guerin, Jamie Cortez, Ryan Holzmacher, Jim Underwood, Brian Hodge, Nate Markward, Jeff Vollman, DarioJaramillo.Bill Munoz, Mike Lehmkuhl, Mark Lafferty. Brad Purl, Third Row:' 
Steve O'Hare, Nick Paulson, Jason Nedlo, Jeff Thiede, Todd Kalesperis, Greg McGrath, Steve Virgili, Dominic Susin. Mike Thompson. Ryan Stephan, Tom Kristof. Fourth Ron Brehl 
Schutte, Jim Quick, Pete Lais, Andrew Maclver. Fifth Row: KenCowden, Lee Zielsdorf, Rob Tuchsherer, Grant Guenther, Darren Olson. Trent Sheridjn. Ryan Finnamore, Doug Bussone 
Tom Vivaldelli, Kris Reuter, Jeff Kaiser, Jim Scholfield, Jake Brens, Will Hansmann. Mark Prinz, Tony Chamura, Tim Laepatina. Jim Gleason, Todd Kemp, Kevin Turk, Mike HoUis. sixth 
Row: Dale Voney, Roman Mrozek, Mike Porter, Ben Runkle, Brian Burt, Brian Parr. Matt O'Hara, Ryan Gough. Andy Heisinger. Jason Stiff. Josh Howell. Alex Padgett. Dean Flickinger. 
Ty Peterson, Brian Neiswender. Seventh Row: Tim Elliot, T. Hauser, Ryan Foster, Jason Guerin, Evan Parke, Mike Mulligan, Greg Kadlec. Rob Novak, Brian Thiede. 




Chapter Name 

Sigma Chi 

Nickname 

Sigs 

Chapter Colors 

Blue & Old Gold 

Symbol 

Eagle 

Flower 

White Rose 

Philanthropy 

Derby Days 

Address 
401 E.John 






Chapter Name 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Nickname 

Phi Sigs 

Chapter Colors 

Red & Silver 

Symbol 

Tumbling T's 

Chapter Flower 

Red Carnation & White 

Tea Rose 

Philanthropy 

Malibu Beach Volleyball 

Tournament 

Address 

1004 S. Second 



*m—**a***mBmmmmmBm—msmmmmimm 










Phi Sigma Kappa: First Row: George Casey, Chad Watson. Jeff Keller, Jack Casaccio, Steve Trubiano, Toby Russell. Second Row: Doug Schuberth, Mike Thompson, Vic Pernandez, 
Brendan McAleenan, Matt Mueller, Tony Calabrese, Rick Szwajkowski, Joe Wagner, Marc DeVar, Andy Bartlow, Justin Eggstaff, Marc McLaughlin, Bob Collins, Eric Dewill, Bill Koelm. 
Third Row: Eric Lewis, Jason O'Sullivan, Mitch Riley, Tim Moran, Greg Wood, Mike Resce, Greg Best, David Legendre, John Demirdjian, Fran Vilarin, Dave Cook, Anthony Frasca: 
Mike Palac, Joe Frasca, John Seguin. Not Pictured: Darrik Dinneen, Geoff Thomas, Troy Wenck, Brent Walker, Chad Taylor, Dave Lee, Dan Abdo, John Seibold, Tyler Munson, Joe 
logmen, Lou Cabrera, Kyle Whittlinger, Doug Dillon, Derrik Fay. 



Greeks 267 




improving in All Areas 

Phi Mu continued to strive to improve their chapter in all 
areas this year. First, the women of Phi Mu concentrated on 
community involvement. Each sister was encouraged to 
get involved in at least one campus activity. With this 
encouragement, Phi Mu was able to increase their all-house 
involvement to ninety-four percent. In addition to individual 
involvement, Phi Mu as a whole participated in many local 
charity events. For example, they worked with the Don 
Moyers Boys and Girls Club, they were active in Students 
Against Multiple Sclerosis, and they participated in Order of 
Omega campus clean-up. In addition, Phi Mu participated in 



Natural Ties, 
formed a 
with a devel- 
disabled 
the commu- 
her to dinner 
Phi Mu was 
with their phi- 
year. They 
nual tennis 
the Spring to 
for the 

Miracle Net- 
also co-spon- 
BeachTourna- 
Sigma Kappa 
money for the 
House. First 
held a Christ- 
with Tau Epsi- 
Don Moyer 
Club. In the 
also held a 
with Alpha 
Lambda. The 
Mu also con- 
developing 
with social 
and sister- 
grams twice a 
programs fo- 





Cbapter Name 

Phi Mu 

Nickname 

Phi Mu's 

Chapter Colors 

Rose & White 

Symbol 

Lion 

Chapter Flower 

Rose Carnation 

Philanthropy 

Children's Miracle Network 

Address 

302 Past Armory 



where they 
friendship 
opmentally 
woman from 
nity, inviting 
once a week, 
also active 
lanthropy this 
held a f irst-an- 
tournamentin 
raise money 
Children's 
work. They 
sored a Malibu 
ment with Phi 
to raise 

Matthew 
semester they 
mas party 
Ion Pi for the 
Boys and Girls 
Fall, Phi Mu 
blood drive 
Kappa 
women of Phi 
centrated on 
their chapter 
awareness 
hood pro- 
month. These 
cused on is- 



sues that are relevant in today's society, such as AIDS and 
eating disorders. They also had activities planned where 
the new members could get to know all of the women in the 
house, with formal introductions and get-to-know-you 
activities. Phi Mu was very proud of all of the awards they 
received and achievements their chapter made this year. 
From the Panhellenic Council Phi Mu was the recipient of 
awards for social awareness, external relations and internal 
relations. They also received an award from their Nationals 
for the Most Improved Chapter. Phi Mu was also proud to 
announce that they moved up five slots in the all-sorority 
grade point average ranking. 





hiMu: J. Bergstrom, T. Harnetiaux. J. Barrett, L. Norris,J. Ward, J. Smull, V.Jeffrey, M. Lee, Mi. Bergman, J. Tharp, P. Lam, B. Richards. Second Row: T. Sherk, D. Hoyne, A. Prange, 
. Galitz. K. Stake, T. Pletz, S. Pawlicki, K. McClintock, K. Carmichael, J. Hodel, A. Fetzer, L. Thompson. Third Row: T. Kerrigan, C. Noian, H. Ploog, T. Petrovich, A. Wozniak, J. 
[armon. G. Montemayor, K. Duitsman, M. Frodyma, C. Miller. K. Pedroza, L. Cline. Fourth Row: S. Chinn, B. Radecki, J. Kim, M. Voss, A. Mertens, J. Paul, B. McKeown, K. Barrios, 
. Hammond, C. McDonough. Fifth Row: K Dunphy. A. Kretchmer. V. Lechner, L. Ward, J. Lyda, M. McQuillan, C. Mahnke, K. Kok-Alblas, J. Klepper, E. Rosiak, A. Spalding. Sixth 
ow: B. Yacullo, S. Malec, J. Ahrling, N. Reicheneker, C. Warp, K. Hall, M. Hollywood, S. Kanani, K. Zarno, L. Kobilca. Seventh Row: A. Landeck, J. Dewey, S. Roupas, T. Rawlish, 
. Jaminski, N. Rockwood, K. Seaman, E. McGrath, K. Werth, D. Watson, E. Bradford, A. Gregg, A. Bundt. Eighth Row: S. Junkus, A. Tufano, K. Witheft, M. Weiclemier, S. Thomson, 
Berquist, H. Newlander, M. Gaumer, K. Gerald, S. Bhakta, S. Perkins, S. Lyons, K. Mursu, T. Millerick. Ninth Row: M. Helphingsrine, T. Langer, L. Adams, E. Hawker, S. Rice, L. 
IcNeal, A. Travis, K. Bloemker, A. Phillippe, A. Daniel, L. Horvath, A. Pray. 




Greeks 269 





Aiming High 



This year, the women of Phi Sigma Sigma continued to 
adhere to their motto "Aim High." First, Phi Sigs started a 
program to improve their alumnae relations. It began with 
a Red Rose Reunion in March, where alumnae were invited 
to come back to the U of I chapter for a formal dinner and 
dance. Phi Sigma Sigma also focused on improving their 
involvement in their philanthropy this year. In order to raise 



money for 
philanthropy, 
Kidney Foun- 
Sigs held a 
with a frater- 
pus.Thisfunc- 
to all U of I 
proceeds 
ticket sales, 
c e e d e d 
to benefit the 
dation. Phi 
also held a 
the Spring to 
for the Phi 
Foundation, 
raiser, mem- 
Sigs "rocked" 
chair on the 
ing pledges 
tions. Phi 
also tried to 
terhood this 
tradition of a 
NIFICANT 
this week, sis- 
events were 
courage the 
of all sisters in 
Some of these 
eluded a 
study night 





Chapter Name 

Phi Sigma Sigma 

Nickname 

Phi Sig's 

Chapter Colors 

King Blue & Gold 

Symbol 

Penguin 

Chapter Flower 

American Beauty Rose 

Philanthropy 

National Kidney 

Foundation 

Address 
902 S. Second 



their National 
the National 
dation, Phi 
Casino Night 
nity on cam- 
tion was open 
students, and 
from the 
which ex- 
Si 300, went 
Kidney Foun- 
Sigma Sigma 
Rock-a-thon in 
raise money 
Sigma Sigma 
For this fund- 
bers of Phi 
in a rocking 
Quad, accept- 
and dona- 
Sigma Sigma 



improve sis- 
year with their 
P H I S I G - 
week. During 
terhood 
held to en- 
involvement 
the house, 
activities in- 
movie night, a 
and ice skat- 
Phi Sigma Sigma is gradually 



ing and bowling events 
changing their new member program, and this year they 
revised their pledge program to eight weeks. By the year 
2000, Phi Sigs will have a four-week pledge program. 
Another change in the pledge program is that pledges are 
referred to as "new members" instead of "pledges." This 
change was made to make the new members feel more 
comfortable in their new home. 





Phi Sigma Sigma: First Row: Karen Sentman, Shannon Nowicki, Debbie Russo, Nicole Kleefisch, Martha Ziegler, Lynda Barrios, Kristin Wendelkin, Melissa Sehstedt, Juliette Holland, Jenny 
Schawb, Karen Peters, Rosa Sanchez, Susan Barr. Second Row: Hilary Heustis, Sandy Kawanaka, Maria Sims, Julie Cook, Nikki Taets, Julie Heap, Gretchen Vondrak, Christine Lease, Sarah 
Stewart. Lauri Rest, Jenny Glover, Yani Provines, Jackie Becker, Julie Cirrincione, Nicole Tomasello, Jill Pistoris, Lara Blankenburg. Third Row: Stephanie Rhodes, Hika Gupta, Stacie Duesterhaus, 
Corrina Smith, Amanda Benson, Melissa Adcock, Brittini Raymond, Erin O'Leary, Donna Tarn, Amanda Lorenz, Sara Reinmann, Sherry Mundorff, April Haenitsch, Kelly Lidinsky, Laura 
Huntington, Amy Thulin. Ann Haronik, Sarah Beard, Julie Hickey, Heather Adcock. Fourth Row: Pam Frazer, Colleen Sweitzer, Jody McCormick, Rachae) Bates, Karen Klebosits, Tricia Conti, 
Becca Potts, Kim Somerville, Dawn DeLaTorre, Kim Meyers, Jennifer Nevius, Anne Marie Tarpey, Gwen DeBrower, Anna Porcaro, Maureen Lord, Kelly Beckett, KrisFimmen, Laura Watkinson. 
Rosa Silva, Shelly Cook. Not Pictured: Denise Aruldoss, Vera Marie Baldoza, Melissa Cooksey, Peggy Funk, Ally Georgio. Laura Gibb. Courtney Greenblatt, Jen Kalafut, Sandra Klapp, Carrie 
Kirkpatrick. Joanna Kohnke, Samantha Lipman, Maureen Miller, Karen Oliver. Smita Patel. Laura Pieper. Amy Rice. Nadine Lipman. 




Phi Sigma Sigma Seniors: First Row: Gwen DeBrower, Jennifer Nevius, Anne Marie Tarpey, Dawn DeLaTorre, Rosa Silva, Anna Porcaro, Nicole Tomasello, Shelly Cook. Second Row: Pam Frazer, 
Kim Meyers, Becca Potts, Rachael Bates, Laura Watkinson, Donna Tarn, Yani Provines, Sarah Stewart. Third Row: Colleen Swietzer, Karen Klebosits, Kim Somerville, Maureen Lord, Jody McCormick, 
Tricia Conti, Kelly Beckett, Kris Fimmen. Not Pictured: Maureen Miller, Sandra Klapp, Ally Georgio, Denise Aruldoss, Melissa Cooksey, Peggy Funk. 



Greeks 271 



m^j^maM^sp^w<%& 




I 



Chi Omega celebrates centennial 

1 935 was Chi Omega's national centennial. In honor of this, 
they held a party in April which consisted of an Eleusinian 
Banquet and a formal ceremony. For this event, all of the 
alumnae were invited to return to U of I to participate in the 
celebration. The original founder's speech was read in 
honor of this event. Because this year was their centennial, 
Chi Omega participated in a national philanthropy. Chi Os 



across the 
involved in a 
Reads Aloud" 
where every 
stories to chil- 
blind. Chi 
participated in 
with Pi Beta 
Alpha Theta. 
went through 
change in their 
gram this 
program was a 
long, and the 
cut down 
ten weeks. Al- 
new members 
until second 
pledges sat 
meetings that 
weeks. In this 
program, Chi 
Care Program 
new members 
socially aware, 
gram, danger- 
were pre- 
pledge meet- 
week, with 
ranging from 
to date rape. 




Chapter Name 

Chi Omega 

Nickname 

Chi Os 

Chapter Colors 

Cardinal & Straw 

Symbol 

Owl 

Chapter Flower 

Carnation 

Philanthropy 

Numerous Charities 

Address 

907 S. Wright 



country were 
"Chi Omega 
program, 
member read 
dren or the 
Omega also 
blood drives 
Phi and Kappa 
Chi Omega 
a complete 
pledge pro- 
year. Their old 
semester 
new program 
pledgeship to 
though the 
did not initiate 
semester, 
through 
only lasted ten 
new pledge 
Os instituted a 
to help the 
become more 
Inthenewpro- 
ous scenarios 
sented at 
ings each 
scenarios 
alcohol abuse 
Social aware- 



ness programs were also extended to include the whole 
house, and several inspirational speakers were invited to 
come talk to their house This year Chi Omega was proud 
to have the 1 994 Homecoming Queen, Gretchen Jokisch, 
as a member of their sorority. In addition, Chi Os were also 
proud to have the Panhellenic President, Tina Green, as a 
member of their sorority. 





;hi Omega: First Row: J. Winter, H. Clough, K. Tryba.J. Schuerman, G. Gottlieb, A. Caruso, C. McLaughlin, N. Bartolic, E. Sullivan, H. Whitney, C.JuddJ. Grisolano, 
i. Antonelli, V. Parrillo, L. Honigschmidt, A. Smith. Second Row. A. Cerny, J. Vegter, C. Debruler, K. Ryan, E. Shipman, S. Elliott, J. Serritella, A, McClusky, M. Reiman, 
V. Ryan, A. Butkauskas, J. Wojcik, A. Delaney, A. Grosball, K. Bierman, J. Upchurch, J. Crusius, J. Lasse, C. Shukas. Third Row:P. Reyes, T. Laux, J. Rhodes, H. Whitledge, 
. Tokarz, L. Miller, J. Weidenbach, H. Oakes. N. Summer, J. Freund, C. Stearney, A. Hilton, S. Roy, K. O'Donnell, N. Grau, A. Kaiser, S. Watts, J. Blue, M. Rosado, K. 
.enthe. Fourth Row: H. Hellem, C. Flores, M. Bryant. H. Doucha, C. Freund, J. Schuler, R. Sabo, J. Meyer, S. McDonald. A. Shipman, T. Kretzer, H. Hollett, K.Jenkins, 
i. Leiding. K. Kane. T. Sjoholm. S. Lee, K. Gorny, C. Sergio, L. Hodger. Fifth Row: S. Wiltz, A. Mathon, J. O'Connor, K. Grode, H. Wainscott. K. Sheehy. K. Berg, S. 
r arber. S. Kordash, K. Oostendorp, H. Sullivan, L. Durkin, J. Prahl, J. Welge, T. Damhoff. H. Haevner, A. Braid, M. Tomczak, H. Hengsbach C. Kohlase. K. Pelak. Sixth 
low: S. Gallick, J. Chase. K. Fudge, J. Huyear, L. Groves, J. Hellyer. T. Macek, T. Gerdes, L. Weier, B. Haefelin, A. Smith, K. Graves, L. Bradenkamp. L. Troiani, K. 
ipeikerman, L. Grotto, M. Sullivan. L. Kuharik, S. Watson, G. Jokisch, K. Obrecht, G. Mendoza, M. Blake, S. Moran, K. Marucco, J. Blue, K.Hirsch, L. Schmidt, K. Sours, 
^. Patel. T. Green, L. Grabowski. Seventh Row: S. Johnson, H. Esmond. M. Seiwert, K. Wilden, J. Carlson, K. Klemm. J. Brown, L. Brow n. 




hi Omega Seniors. 



Greeks 273 



r^resun^ Into tAe ipitptra 



II ! 

i' 

1 1 ■ 

! 



"We're 

excited to 

learn from 

other 

organizations 

as well as to 

share our 



resources. 



// 



-Nathan 



Hood 



"Change is inevitable - Progress is op- 
tional," - stated Mr. Dick Lees, an alumnus 
of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. During the 1994- 
1995 school year, the Greek community took 
numerous steps to get back to the basics, 
remember the ideals on which their organi- 
zations were founded and use these as 
guidelines to stimulate not just change, but 
progress. This fundamental inspiration was 
exemplified by the efforts of the Interfra- 
ternity, Panhellenic 
and Black Greek 
Councils, as well as 
in the University 
Greek Affairs Office. 

One of the most 
positive and radical 
adjustments came 
from above. The Of- 
fice of the Dean of 
Students took a sec- 
ond glance at the ad- 
vising structure 

available to Greeks, reevaluated its effec- 
tiveness and made changes to cater to the 
needs of the present community. In the 
past, the university divided the advising 
staff according to gender, providing a Dean 
of Fraternities as well as a Dean of Sorori- 
ties. In order to more effectively serve the 
present campus climate, the Dean of Stu- 
dents reconsidered the gender philosophy 
and decided that a task divided system was 
more appropriate. The Greek Affairs Office 
welcomed Craig Jackson as Assistant Dean 
and Carmen Ahlers as the Assistant to the 
Dean in the Fall of 1993 and since then, the 
kinks have been ironed out and the advis- 
ing system is operating smoothly. Jackson 
dealt with issues like Public Relations and 
the Greek Evaluation, while Ahlers con- 
centrated on topics like Rush and Recruit- 




(^ctfurnHnlty 






stresses tAawge 



ment and Membership Education. 

Further signs of progress were seen in tht 
efforts of Nathan Hood, Interf raternity Coun 
cil President, Tina Green, Panhellenic Coun 
cil President, and Clyde Mize, Black Greel 
Council President, in conjunction with thei: 
respective council executive boards and mem 
bers. In an effort to unify these communitie: 
and increase multicultural awareness, th( 
Council presidents planned joint communit) 
service programs foil 
both the Spring ancl 
Fall of 1995. In tht 
Spring, the council 
members hoped tcl 
come together during 
Greek Week to make i 
unified contributior 
to the Urbana-Cham 
paign community 
This willingness tc 
reach out and oper 
the lines of commu- 
nication was viewed as a tremendous ben 
efit to individual development and im- 
proved race relations. 

The Council presidents not only reached 
out to each other, but steps were also taker 
to reach outside the Greek Community anc 
tap into the minds of other campus leader: 
as well. Hood and Green felt it might be 
advantageous to seek out leaders of man) 
large campus organizations and bring them 
together on a regular basis. 

"We're excited to learn from other orga- 
nizations as well as to share our resources 
and make some common efforts, "j 
stated Hood. 

The philosophy went back to the premise 

of strength in numbers, and the 

leaders of the movement hoped to make 

(story continued on page 276) 



274 Greeks 




-Rick Widmer 




•^3N MKappaPsi, located on the corner of 
lT" Fourth and Chalmers Streets, is the 
oldest chapter house on campus; it was built 
in 1908. During the 1994-1995 school year, 
university alunmae banded together in order 
to preserve Greek houses on campus. 

*)/1/t egan Matthys, sophomore in Educa- 
y rv tion, blindfolds a community child 
during a game at a Fall Halloween Party. 
Members of Shi-ai, a Panhellenic honor- 
ary, took part in this party to benefit the 
area youth. 



Panhel/IFC/BGC 275 



r 
I : 




> y of I Chancellor Michael 
i/JLf Aiken talks with Tina 
Green, President of the Pau- 
hellenic Council, during a luncheon 
held in the Colonial Room of the 
Illlini Union. 

^lsfj ichael Aiken addresses 
y f \ the student leaders and 
University officials during a Stu- 
dent Affairs Luncheon. This group 
meets once a month to discuss uni- 
versity issues. 




276 Greeks 




(story continued from page 274) 
this "Presidents' Council" a regular on the 
agenda of every campus leader. 

Another progressive switch among 
Greeks spirited by the Panhellenic Council 
was a refocusing of their philanthropic ef- 
forts. While philanthropy is a standard in 
every Greek organization, in the past the 
concentration has been on fund- 
raising efforts. 

Based on her experiences, Tina Green 
felt it might be beneficial to rethink this 
philanthropic concentration. While 
fundraising is certainly necessary, a push 
has been made to increase the amount of 
"hands-on" community service. Green felt 
that this push would "channel the efforts 
of a large campus community into more 
meaningful projects. Greeks have the 
chance to give back to the community 
and actually follow through with the ide- 
als which they represent." 

The Greek community reacted positively 
to this effort, and undoubtedly the Urbana- 
Champaign community appreciated it as well. 

A new focus of both current Greek mem- 



bers and alumnae during the 1 994-1 995 school 
year was to save the Greek houses on cam- 
pus. For fear of losing these age old monu- 
ments, a society has banded together for the 
Preservation of Greek Housing. By maintain- 
ing the physical structures, the committee 
felt that positive Greek spirit can be main- 
tained as well. 

Craig Jackson, a representative on this 
committee, stated, "The Society is provid- 
ing numerous ways for alumni to ensure 
the viability of chapter houses. We have 
already assisted a number of chapters in 
getting their house placed on the National 
Registry, a designation which permanently 
eliminates the possibility of the structure 
being torn down." With persistent effort, 
the Society hoped to preserve the brilliance 
and beauty which Greek houses add to 
the university. 

As the world progresses to the close of 
the 20th century, the Greek community 
looks ahead to the opportunities of a new 
era. Adjustments are being made and 
progress, not just change, is a reality. 

— Story by Marie O'Connor 



— Courtesy of the Office of Greek Affairs 

ISfjt embers of the 1994 Pan- 
y r\ hellenic Executive Board 
pose for a picture ivith Will Keim. 
Ph.D. Keim is a nationally re- 
nowned speaker zvho delivered his 
speech "The Education of Charac- 
ter" to many Greek students at 
Foellinger Auditorium in October. 



Panhel/IFC/BGC 277 



III 

■'I 




Year of Change 



This year Alpha Delta Pi had many changes. First, ADPi had a new 
membership program. Their pledge program was reduced to four 
weeks, and their whole program was modified to make the new 
members feel more equal. In order to meet this goal, ADPi refers 
to their new members as "Alphas" instead of "Pledges." In 
addition, ADPi allows their Alphas to participate in all of the same 
activities as their active members. For example, they new 
members are allowed to wear letters, vote and go to chapter. In 
order to welcome their new Alphas to the house, ADPi held a 
weekend-long retreat at the 4-H Memorial Camp at Allerton. For 



the first night, 
the executive 
bers stayed at 
low the new 
feel more com- 
the leaders of 
of the house 
following day, 
whole house 
the first time, 
party called a 
tion for their 
their house first 
invited the men 
Phi to this party 
for Bid Night, 
a semi-formal 
party. Alpha 
ing group per- 
event. In order 
cial awareness, 
ADPi held a To- 
Education Pro- 
consisted of a 
shops through- 
This program 
nation with an 
Nationals to fo- 
issues facing 
of the work- 
around prob- 
STDs, date rape 
First semester 
Alpha Delta Pi 
thousand dol- 





Chapter Name 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Nickname 

ADPis 

Chapter Colors 

Azure Blue & White 

Symbol 

Alphie the Lion 

Chapter Flower 

Woodland Violet 

Philanthropy 

Ronald McDonald House 

Address 

1202 W. Nevada 



the Alphas and 
board mem- 
the camp to al- 
members to 
fortable with 
ADPi. The rest 
joined them the 
bringing the 
together for 
ADPi also held a 
MocktailRecep- 
new initiates at 
semester. They 
of Alpha Sigma 
to thank them 
This party was 
non-alcoholic 
Delta Pi's sing- 
formed for this 
to increase so- 
the women of 
tal Membership 
gram which 
series of work- 
out the year, 
was in coordi- 
effort by their 
cus on current 
women. Some 
shops centered 
lems such as 
and stress, 
the women of 
donated one 
lars to their 



National philanthropy, the Ronald McDonald House. In addition, 
they traveled to the Springfield house for a Halloween party, 
bringing decorations and cooking the children a spaghetti dinner. 
They returned to the house in Springfield at Christmas time to 
go caroling. ADPi prides itself on its achievements in the area of 
scholarship. This year, they were ranked fifth in the all-sorority 
GPA ranking. In order to promote good grades, ADPi recognizes 
the scholar of the week at chapter. In addition, they also award 
a cookie to the winner of the "smart cookie award." This 
recognition is given to the member who was found to have 
helped a sister with her homework that week. 





Jpha Delta Pi: First Row: Stefanie Herman, Kristen Pettijohn, Lynsy Evans, Julie Lewis, Christine Lustfelt, Tracy Buedel, Karyn Strang, Emily Lotz, Stacy Lindstedt, Lubka Benak, Elizabeth Osterhage, Liz McGrath, Megan Murphy, Jessica 
jreutzer, Michelle Gannon, Liisa Andersson, Jen Korte, Colleen Dorsey, Laure DeHaan, Leslie Knittel, Leslie Sweet, Shannon Tebben, Jaime Vallone, Melissa Peterson. Second Row: Krissy Clingan, Gina Locascio, Amy Peterson, Ellen Rehn, 
ara Hallberg, Kathy Ruth, Alyssa Knutson, Jessica Ayers, Shelby Duke, Cara Friedline, Corie O'Melia, Amy Peipert, Emily McCoy, Heather Aeschleman, Beth Gilman, Kristin Snedon, Bridget O'Neill, Sara Young, Cassie Meisinger. Third Row: 
.pril Halser, Dawn Brehart, Nicole Tempia, Erin Welsh, Jenny Hoppe, Heather Winkelmann, Andrea Enright. Carrie VanHook, Sonja Kemmis. Fourth Row: Darci Black, Jenny Kiaschko, Monica Moehring, Michelle Dekoj, Michelle Fliss, Jeni 
V irtz, Nicole Baranauskas, Marika Soot, Paula Hulting, Christina Swartzfager, Lori Shepard, Amy Prechtel, Lisa Nelson, Karen Getz, Jana Jensen, Molly Tarter, Laurie Suthers, Stacy Arnold, Patty DeFily, Courtney Chapman, Julie Stauss, Jen 
:ox. Liz Schmidt, Debbie Scherer, Kim Stregulz. Fifth Row: Jenny Scherer, Mary Michel, Annisa Jamil, Cari Liter, Mona Shah, Barbara Bergdolt, Neelie Herman, Paige Schrieffer, Christie Cash, Lori Sapa, Otilia Benak. Marion Nelson, Jenn 
dmonson, Jen VonBehren, Julie Tomhave, Mendy Russell, Sarah Brown, Teresa Hamill, Sarah Rosas, Julie Winkelmann, Sonia Mulder, Sam Furry, Laurie Klappauf. Sixth Row: Shana Ferral, Bev Huckstadt, Susan Sutor, RondaSchmalz, Danielle 
hine, Amy O'Malley, Robyn Nielssen, Janet Nowaczyk, Kelly Harvey, Michelle Hoffman, Linda Seiler, Jamie Cooper, Gina Payton, Margie Osterkamp, Annika VanGelder, Janice Holba, Julie Argentine, Joy Finnegan, Zinnie Weise.JenDuclos. 
lot pictured: Joanna Bolas, Janine Brill, Anne Bunte, Cori Burke, Nicki Ciccarelli, Trina Cokel, Jen Faris, Katie Frasor, Karla Given, Lori Given, Chris Guleserian, Kim Houser, Kathy Hui, Andrea Koenig. Erika Kovacik, Chris Lucchesi, Mira 
loric, Elizabeth Moulds, Martha Pellegrino, Kirsten Rak, Hedy Reategui, Julie Smith, Tracy Stirniman, Angie Taylor, Kris Wayer. 




Greeks 279 



Acacia 

1 




l|.j 



Chapter Name 

Acacia 

Chapter Colors 

Black & Old Gold 

Symbol 

Right Triangle 

Chapter Flower 

Acacia 

Philanthropy 

Numerous Organizations 

Address 

907 S. Third 







Acacia: First Row: Michael St. Martin, Robert Mertes. Doug Sury Jeff Sons, Shawn Hill, Ian Cull, Andrew Justice, Patrick Owens, Brian Thomas. IT. Clendenin, Kevin Shea. Second 
Row: Mike Walsh, Matt Carmody, Andy Nowak, Dan St. Martin, Norm Rivera, Michael Broms, Timothy Thompson, Casey Hunt, Josh Schwede, Jess Waldeck, Tom Renkes, Tin* >ihy 
Rottach. Third Row: Chad Sellman, Grant Cain, Mark Worman, Mike DeLeonardis, Jeremy Coleman, Scott Koch, Mike McEldowney, Tim Pearson, Ryan Flach, Marcus Samaan, Jay ' 
Rodgers. Fourth Row: Dave Jennings, Alex Basich, Curt Brees, Matthew Douglas, Michael Conniff, Eugene Gorfin, Andrew Read. Dave Bernstein, Bryan Gall. Michael Curtis. Fifth Row: \ 
Ben Younger, Tim Weselak, Drew Sikula, Chuck Malone, Mike O'Connor, Kris Price, Sam Mehta, Dan Rovelstad, Jon Branham. Sixth Row: Andrew Porter, Brian Hofmann, Eric Kimoto, 
Matt Gardner, George Haenisch, Brian Eby, David Tanny, Omar Marcos, Jason Busboom, Leo Mendia. 



AEn 




. a ii A » 
pilOA 



■■■.. ■■ 



Chapter Name 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 

Nickname 

A Pi 

Chapter Colors 

Blue & Gold 

Symbol 

Angry Lion 

Philanthropy 

Flag Football Tournament 

Address 

110 E. Chalmers 




Alpha Epsilon Pi: First Row: Josh Erlich, Todd Burman, Mike Hoffman. Scott Shapiro, Paul Brown, Jess Block, Larry Tarschis, Matt Hoffman, Harris Weinblart, Brian Pollack, Geoff 
Levin, David Heuberger, Paul Shuman, Joy Soloff. Second Row: Matt Spiegel, Brian Schwarzbrott, Harry Brody, Glenn Simon, Paul Miller. Andrew Weissman. Ethan Hafner. Ross Gordon. 
Mike Henry. Third Row: Brad Heuberger, Dan Grijnsztein, Scott Barbakoff. Ryan Kaufman, Scott Fenster, Matt Weinstock, Lenny Weiss, Neal Gold. Brian Septon. Fourth Row: Brian 
Glassenberg, Alan Wiseman, Jack Powitz, Marty Zeidman, Steve Pearlman, Jason Cherpak, Jeff Sterbenc, Brett Rootberg, Mike Landler. David Helfand. Eldad Bialecki. 




x\j\y v 



Alpha Kappa Lambda: First Row: Chris Hill, Jim O'Malley w/Sandy the House Dog, Brian Carroll, Bob Canavan, Mike Esposito, Pete Vrdolyak. Second Row: Jim Groselak, Jeff Keane, 
Joe Leone. J.D. McFarland, Sean Buckley, Navin Bhojwani, Oscar Olmos, Mike Horstman. Third Row: Joe Nagle, Mike Argao, Jeff Chevalier, Peter Brant, Bill Borkowski, Rick Reese, 
Larry Walton, Vince Del Medico, Kartik Tamhane, John Heskin. Fourth Row: Aaron Spelker, Nick Halper, Mike Madigan, Craig Cuchra, Rich Hoffman, Steve Gradman, John Fitzpatrick, 
Josh Eden, Greg Nagy, James Curry, Derek Maratea, Ben Montgomery, Greg Heeren. Fifth Row: Dan Vaughn, Eric Rodriquez, Marty Brotschul, Van Woods, Andy Bjornberg, Matt Hanks, 
Eric Yopchick, Eric Schmidt, Craig Laudeman, Dan Gerbasi, Jeremy Schirer. Not Pictured: Andy Chandarana, Jim Lord, CJ. Smith, Matt Hammes, Brian Mangan, Jeff Minor, Marty McGrath. 




i&grtT 



Chapter Name 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 

Nickname 

AKLs 

Chapter Colors 

Purple & Yellow 

Chapter Flower 

Yellow Rose 

Philanthropy 

Cystic Fibrosis 

Address 
401 E. Daniel 




i\\ ir\ 



Alpha Xi Delta: Sarah Akinaka, Melinda Alwardt, Teri Andrews, Cynthia Berenson, Ashley Bodmer, Jennifer Bounds, Heidi Brown, Laura Bunting, Lavanya Chandrashekar, Tracy 
Cole, Christine Cramer, Terri Daino, Karen Dumser, Lilac Epstein, Jennifer Ewen, Ellen Fester, Kim Ford, Janice Gandaylor, Michelle Harris, Mary Ho, Melissa Huminik, Emily Ingle, 
Sheryl Intorp, Mieko Iyamma, Lenorejenson, Lisa Junzil. Jackie Kahn, Julie Kang, Laura Kieler, Kerry Kincanon, Risha Kumar, Gwendelyn Leumix, Kimberly Magee, Alisa Mayer, Holley 
Mims, Amy Moulder, Karen Mueller, Lynn Munday, Jackie Norris, Mai Nguyen, Amy Oberly, Oxana Oronov, Monica Paul, Mandy Pecharich, Day Penaflor, Carrie Peterson, Sheri Procious, 
Santi Rival, Courtney Ronan, Ericka Rossovich, Carolyn Sampson, Jennifer Schoeffmann. Kelley Squires, Jessica Tallian, Beth Tarr, Christy Theims, Stacy Thompson, Kristin Tufts, Kristin 
Walker. Endie Williams, Melissa Wolfe, Linda Yoon, Tamara Yowell, Dawn Zebroski. 





Alpha Xi ru-lr;i ( 



Chapter Name 

Alpha Xi Delta 

Nickname 

A Xi Ds 

Chapter Colors 

Light Blue, Dark Blue & Gold 

Symbol 

Quill 

Chapter Flower 

Pink Killarney Rose 

Philanthropy 

Choose Children 

Address 
715 W. Michigan 



"We still 



etA, In honor ok ^&nke 

A party with a history. That's what Mary's and Cartoon Gypsies, from Indi- 
Alpha Delta Phi's annual Moosehead ana University in Bloomington, Ind. 
party is all about. Unlike most parties on "Moosehead was a blast. One of the 
campus, this one has special meaning to reasons why it was such a success was 
the men of Alpha Delta Phi. As the story because there were so many different 
is told, about 13 years ago, some vandals kinds of people there, greeks and non- 
broke into the Alpha Delt house over the greeks alike. Everyone seemed to have a 
summer and attempted to steal the head great time," said Osian O'Sullivan, se- 
of a moose, known as "Duke". Instead nior in LAS. 
they just slashed the moose's neck. When "Moosehead is always a great time 



'I 

if 

! 



hold the 

party for the 

history, not 

just for the 

fun." 

— Scott 



Jackson 



the guys returned in 
the fall, they discov- 
ered Duke was in- 
jured. While trying 
to get him down off 
of the wall, they ac- 
cidentally dropped 
Duke and broke his 
nose. After the 
whole ordeal of get- 
ting Duke repaired, 
the men decided to 
have a party in 



Aet&s tAe 
environment 



for everyone be- 
cause it happens ev- 
ery year and there 
are always alums 
who come back to 
celebrate with us," 
said Ted Waterson, 
senior in LAS. 

In addition to be- 
ing a great party, it 
has also turned into 
a philanthropic 
event. One girl from 



honor of Duke's return. The idea was every sorority has a chance to enter their 

originated by Steve Spears and John contest. An entry fee of $25 is collected 

Peisker, both Alpha Delt alums. This first and each girl is interviewed. The winner 

party was called "The Moose is Back" is chosen based on her involvement with 

and was very small compared to recent environmental activities. The winner is 

Moosehead parties. The only guests were given a prize of $200. All of the money 

the men of Alpha Delta Phi and the little collected goes to Sierra Club, which is an 

sisters of the house. environmental group that works to pre- 

"Moosehead still means the same today serve land in Canada where moose live, 

as it did 13 years ago. We still hold the party An admission fee of $1 also goes to the 

for the history, not just for the fun," said Sierra Club. 
Scott Jackson, junior in LAS. Moosehead isn't just your typical fra- 

Over the years, Moosehead grew into a ternity party, it's a philanthropic event 

huge party drawing more than 2000 with a story behind it topped off with a 

people. This year's party took place on lot of fun. 
Feb. 4 and hosted two bands, House — Story by Debbie Williams 



4r-^r tiring Alpha Delta Phi's annual Moosehead party, the House 
f^_f Mary's perform in front of a packed crowd. More than 2000 
teople came to the party. 




-Courtesy of Afterhours Photography 



Courtesy of Afterhours Photography 



^3\ eople gathered on the balcony to get a better view of the bands 
-£; performing below at Moosehead. The party was held in an 
ffort to raise money for the Sierra Club. 



The Cartoon Gypsies entertained the audience at Moosehead. 
The band was the opening act for the thirteenth annual 
Moosehead party. 



Moosehead 283 



ii 





i 

1:1 
I 

\i 

I 





Chapter Name 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

Nickname 

Alpha Sigs 

Chapter Colors 

Cardinal & Stone 

Symbol 

Phoenix 

Chapter Flower 

Talisman Rose 

Philanthropy 

Canine Companions 

Address 

211 E. Armory 



Alpha Sigma Phi: First row:Tom Shukas, Brian Flores, Al Enrique, Juan Cabrales, Chuck Veers. Second row: Todd Berta, Mark Christensen, Matt Flanagan, Matt Frank. Tony Paulella. 
Steve Remotigue, Craig Horstman. Third row: Tim Richards, Dan Baltes, Mike Sutis, Eric Sutherland, Jim Figura, Mike Buedel, Chad Gibson. Fourth row: Pete Spizzirri. Brian Cabote, ( 
Anthony Quartullo, Ryan Stawarz, Aaron Heine, Juan Martinez. Nathan Hood, Scott Stawarz. Fifth row: A.J. Yolofsky, Ryan Speer, Larry Barry, Scott Havranek. Dave Wagner, Steve 
Breden.Jim Moody, Matt Singer, Tim McLaughlin, B.K. Bala, Patrick Peters. Ed Cavaney, Jason Liner, Bruce Cope. Sixth row: Eric Baima, Todd Pleune, Matt Noonkester, Jeff Smorynski, 
Dan Klein, Marc Gryzlo, Steve Labahn, Erik Sachs, Michael Stubbe, Lance McOlgan. Not pictured: Jayme Anthony, Sunil Ayyagari, George Balis, Brian Burger, Dan Cullerton, Paul ' 
Deveaux, Lane Drager, Cory Hein, Erik Homan, Derrick Kaiser, Tony Konowal, Dave Konsoer, Greg Kroencke, Rick Lawrence, Marty Mavec, Roger Maynulet, Eric Partaker. Brian 
Pyevich, Steve Pytlak, Mike Rebara, Jeff Remotigue, Mike Schlueter, Matt Schneider, Ed Shannon, Mike Showers, Jim Vozza, EricWang. 



;;; ; ;:: 




Alpha Sigma Phi Seniors: First Row. Tony Paolella, Michael Stubbe. Nathan Hood, Aaron Heine. Second Row: Anthony Quartullo, Juan Martinez. Scott Martinez, Tim Richards. To 
Pleune, Dan Klein, Eric Baima, Jason Uner, Brian Cabote, A.J. Yolofsky. 



■■■■Aa^HHlkaHBMM 




H-lta Delta Delta: First row: Amy Frett. Jessie Engleson, Michelle Wicker, Jenni Boston, Sandra Subotich, Sally Herzog, Katie Smithson, Nicole Hunt, Jaimii Shin, Lina Augius. Second 
ow: Lauren Kemner, Mara Ackerman, Nicole Ransom, Amy Coffman, Kim Epperson, Carrie Teeple, Lauren Lukasik, Kristen Lorenz, Jill Antonini, Kim Garr, Gennifer Venton, Jen Marble 
.ori Hill. Nicole Lizio, Amy Clark, Tricia Wertheim, Noel Piecki. Third row: Suzanne Bante, Heather Parmalee, Windy Moyers, Kim Schmitt, Bea Arana, Beth Biando, Karen Tarzon, Molly 
'oung, Sara Kuster, Aimee Mendoza, Kerry Collins, Courtney Bishop, Beth Sallmann, Laurie Assmus, Cari Schaffer, Karen Cox, Lisa Alberts, Jen Turner, Sheri Klintworth, Kristen Henwood 
Jancy Camp, Jami Ippolito, Holly Cole, Jen Bobe. Fourth row: Laura Zerbe, Jen Kurth, Lynn Mendel, Katie DeLeon, Debbie Hanna, Kari Tipton, Sara Rousenelos, Katherine Ripley, Rebbeccs 
)eryke, Lia Valerio, Laura Kohl, Marie Koch, Joy Jodlowski, Ann Lorden, Pam Rabe, Tanya Klayman, Mere Frost, Meredith Sieban, Michele King, Heidi Turacek. Ann Mullarkey, Christina 
Jiancalana, Jacquie James, Emily Cassell, Amy Bartkowicz, Kendra Anerson, Deena Rowden, Noreen O'Hara, Heidi Knudsen, Joon Choi, Kelly Butts. Fifth row: Laura Zerbe, Amanda 
)oolin, Kristin Grant, Paige Laverty, Jill Kranz, Pauline Dietrich, Jenny Nelson, Ivelisse Rodriguez, Shannon Sheilds, Jane Gregory, Kristen Ferry, Renee Bianchi, Sophie Stokes, Nikki 
Dsterman, Andrea Huston, Sarah Beckman, Jill Walkington, Kristen Cote, Kristen Barnett, Tara McNally, Sandy Durham, Stephanie Roberts, Suzanna Tutoky, Amy Hill, Nikky Wilson, 
Michelle Fiorello, Liz Straub. Sixth row: Kristy Kelly, Jamie Butts, Carla Radecki, Kari McKinnon, Krissy Walz, Tara Tschetter, Jamie Thornton, Becky Kresin, Kristen Stephansen, Tracey 
aughlin, Marie Tamondong, Kim Speckman, Tina Glenzinski, Jessica Klayman, Brooke Bryant, Maurissa Frost, Sara Rowden, Lisa Phelps, Brooke Roberts, Lisa Batchellor, Kelly Hunt, 
tana Sihwail, Suzanne Wimmer. Jamie Zipkoff, Heather Wille, Carrie Jacobsen, Molly Reisinger, Debbie Burrell, Amy Zbinden, Michelle Lacivita, Rachel Broderick, Nicole Weiner, Kim 
Jednarz, Jill Minnaert, Laura Sallmann, Stacy Wrigley, Talley Arnold, Amy Zerante. Tricia Meece. Rebbecca Privette. 




Chapter Name 

Delta Delta Delta 

Nickname 

Tri Delts 

Chapter Colors 

Silver, Gold & Blue 

Symbol 

Dolphin 

Chapter Flower 

Pansy 

Philanthropy 

Children's Cancer Charities 

Address 

508 E. Chalmers 




AY 



)elta Upsilon: First row: Erik Zaimans, Mark Garcia, Tony Tomillo, Ti Hays, Pong Hongaoshavalit, Britt Whereman, Mike Awad, Robb Johnson, Jim VanHuyse, Garret Hoerner, 
)oug Hart. Second row: Paul Farahvar, Jamie Meschewski, Greg Siebert, Casey Homoly, Scott Siebert, Jeff Biolchini, Jeff Snow. John Powloski, George Sfondilis, Kevin Beers, Blake 
ohrabaugh. Phil Wilder. Third row: Brett Hoovel, Mike Trimberger. Mike Huzinec, Erik Francour, Matt Ozborn, Brian Vogel, Brian McleenanJ.D. Skaggs, Jeff Junkas, Travis Webb, 
latt Kueker. Fourth row: Jason Gagliano. Brian Therian, Moose, Matt Joergensen, Ryan Ghere, Brian Bone, Dan Grossman, Steve Kao, Jeff Blada, Dave Lee, Brian Basch, Chris Yapp, 
in Shorr, Dave Andrejak, George Xamplas. Matt Ring. Fifth row: Garren Vartanian, Dave Kahley, Brian Carothers, Kevin Miller, Adam Wright, Josh Collen, Harley Sorkin, Jim Kim, 
teve Snow, Scott Graziano. 




Chapter Name 

Delta Upsilon 

Nickname 

D.U. Ducks 

Chapter Colors 

Blue & Gold 

Symbol 

Duck 

Philanthropy 

The Villages 

Address 

312 E. Armory 



Ill 

•; 



n 





?f 



llll 



Chapter Name 

Zeta Psi 

Nickname 

Zetes 

Chapter Colors 

White & Gold 

Symbol 

Tasmanian Devil 

Chapter Flower 

Rose 
Philanthropy 
National Kidney Foun- 
dation 
Address 
803 W. Oregon 




Zeta Psi: First Row: Mike Jones, Darin Trobaugh. Second Row: Rob Peninglon, Albert Chow, Neil Kleemann, Markus Veile. Third Row: Shannon Kirkpatrick, Tony Zeffiro, Colt. 
Anderson, Evan Katzke, Bob Intarakumhang, Matt Sudduth, Paul Addotta, Mark Johnson, Chris Hendricks. Fourth Row: Mark Hulin. Kevin Emery, Steve Ibendahl, Toddjacobsc 
Greg Bemosky, Mike Clark, Mike Harshbarger, Matt Elwood, Darren Forgy, Benjackels, Nate Bremmier, Jon Luttrell. 




iks 






Chapter Name 

Tbeta Chi 

Chapter Colors 

Military Red & White 

Chapter Flower 

Red Carnation 

Philanthropy 

Cunningham 

Children's Home 

Address 

1404 S. Lincoln 



Theta Chi: First Row: Dave Hladik, Brian Pozen, Angie Paras, Joe Elarde, Hal Gallimore. Second Row: Nick Shin, Darrel Goeddel, Aditya Chaudhary, Jose Ruiz, Karl Hammond. Third 
Row: Jason Blazier, Jeff Bridge, Chris Oliver, Ryan Murray, Ron Bednar. Jerry Aultz. Fourth Row: Gil Palacio, Shamus Regan, Dan Bechtel, Nick Keil, Chuck Brown, Jason Ayeroff. 





Greeks 287 



cnAm^f & Aetmnfl hunA 



// 



1 

h 

* i 



I was 



happy to see 

how it grew 

from a small 

effort into 

a huge 



program 



rr 



Tina 



Green 



Although the Adopt-a-School program 
came to the U of I only two years ago, it has 
quickly grown into one of the largest volun- 
teer organizations on this campus. The idea of 
starting a tutoring program was first raised 
by PTA members in Urbana. These women 
approached the Greek system as a means for 
ensuring that their idea would be widely re- 
ceived. The Greek system combined with the 
Office of Volunteer Programs agreed to bring 
Adopt-a-School, a national organization, to 
the U of I. 

In its first year on 
this campus, Adopt-a- 
School had 30 volun- 
teers to tutor at Urbana 
Middle School. Since 
the fall of 1993 this pro- 
gram has grown expo- 
nentially and it now 
has more than 300 
members, incorporat- 
ing five schools in 

Champaign and Urbana. Volunteers involved 
with this program have the opportunity to 
work with students in pre-, elementary and 
middle schools. 

"I have been involved with Adopt-a-School 
since its establishment at the U of I. I really 
enjoyed assisting in the organization of the 
whole program, and I was happy to see how 
it grew from a small effort into a huge pro- 
gram," said Tina Green, senior in LAS. 

When Adopt-a-School was first started 
at the U of I, only one person oversaw the 
entire program. A change this year was in 
the establishment of a committee to oversee 
all operations, with five chairpersons for 
each of the five schools that participate. 
This committee is made up of both Inter 
Fraternity Council and Panhellenic Mem- 
bers, with the Office of Volunteer Programs 
providing the structure. This joint advising 
system makes Adopt-a-School a university 
program as well as a Greek program. This 
committee is responsible for matching the 
volunteers with the students in the five 
schools, based on the tutor's availability. 

Although this program is run by Greeks, it 
is open to all students. Approximately 20 
percent of the volunteers are non-Greek. Stu- 



greeks Aeip 

put area 
tAUdren 



dents have the opportunity to receive infor-' 
mation about this program at Quad Day or at 
either one of the two informational meetings 
held during the year. 

Volunteers involved in this program have 
control over how much time they devote to 
Adopt-a-School. Most students spend be- 
tween one and four hours a week, with the 
committee's suggestion to volunteer at least 
two hours a week. Opportunities for tutoring 
vary for each of the five schools involved. 
In the elementary 
schools, most of the 
volunteer time is spent 
in group settings, 
with tutors assisting 
with play time. In 
the middle schools 
more time is devoted 
to individual tutoring 
and assisting with 
homework. 

"One of the best 
things about the Adopt-a-School program is 
that it allows university students to put some- 
thing back into the community," said Tom 
Sutter, sophomore in Agriculture and Adopt- 
a-School Chairperson. 

When Adopt-a-School was first started, its, 
main goal was to increase its awareness on 
campus and to attract a lot of volunteers. Now 
that the program has grown so large, its new 
focus is on improving the quality of the tutor- 
ing that takes place and refining the process to 
ensure that both tutors and tutees are satis- 
fied. This change in focus was one of the 
topics discussed at the Illinois /Indiana State 
Adopt-a-School Conference that was held in 
January of 1995. More than 50 students from 
12 universities attended this conference, al- 
lowing the transfer of ideas from multiple 
Adopt-a-School settings. 

"My tutoring experiences through Adopt- 
a-School were very rewarding," said Nikki 
Crawford, junior in Agriculture. "I worked 
with a sixth grader at Urbana Middle School, 
and I enjoyed going there to tutor him in math 
and science because he was always happy to 
see me. It is a great feeling to know that you ] 
are helping someone." 

— Story by Emma Brennan 




-Derek Niedringhaus 




/I dopt-a-School volunteer Lindsay Horig 
^^l Schmidt, freshman in FAA, helps Cory 
Hubbell, a sixth grade student at Urbana 
Middle School, with his vocabulary sentences. 

/+ cott Fenster, an Adopt-a-School vol- 
(^y unteer and a junior in LAS, helps Skyler 
Trisman, a sixth grade student at Urbana 
Middle School, during a University Program. 



-Derek Niedringhaus 



Adopt-a-School 289 





Members of PI Lambda Phi: Sean Abrams, Jeff Agrest, Darren Anders, David Arenberg, Seth Baker, Alan Blonz, David Bluestone. Ron Cohen, Mike Drazin. Alex Dunn, Ryan Engel, 
Rob Footlik, Jacques Galante, Mike Goldstein, Brad Greenberg, Allen Groner. Brian Kalina, Mark Kaplan, Man K.irth. Mitch Kurman, Harmon Lyons, Perry Meyers, William Orkin, 
Brandon Rubens, Dan Saban, Scott Sagett, Matt Simon, Ralph Steinberg, Jake Terson, Josh Wallach, Ryan Witcher. Josh Abrams. Jon Alt, Seth Bankier, Greg Cohen. Heath Cohen. Jon 
Dunn, Jeff Gilfand, Adam Liebman, Eric Meyers, Brian Peerless, Dan Perper, Brian Robinson, Marc Rosen, Jason Tort. Pete Wahlstrom, I)a\id Waller. Josh Vulish. Brian Zaban, Roq 
Abrams, Aaaron Cohen, Jared Cohen, Andy Goldman, Adam Kalian, Andy Laytin, Paul Margolis, Andy Orloff, Andy Sachs. David Wolkowitz. 





Chapter Name 

Pi Lambda Phi 

Nickname 

Pi Lambs 

Chapter Colors 

Gold & Purple 

Philanthropy 

Super Sloppy Double 

Dare for the 

American Cancer 

Society 

Address 

1105 S. First 




290 Greeks 



KAP 




Kappa Delta Rho: First Row: Shawn Ferber, Joe Weber, John Klein, Jay Maggio, Mike Mueller, Norm Murrin, Mike Cabage, Keith Meister, Joe Stefanski, Ryan Hall. Second Row: Jim 
Cameron. Ned Swanson, Mark Faulkner, Brian Faulkner, Paul Klaus, Chris Mueller, Mark Phillips, Chris Weigand, Eric Wood. Third Row: Dave Johnson, Sean McDonald, Chris Jahn, 
Pete Roberts, Scott Burns, Kevin Beth, David Hurler, Chris Kreps, Keith Lake. 





Chapter Name 

Kappa Delta Rho 

Nickname 

KDRs 

Chapter Colors 

Orange & Blue 

Chapter Flower 

Red Rose 

Address 

1110 S. Second 





Theta Xi: First Row: Andy Bennett, Derek Ladgenski, Tony Volovik, A.J. Adams, Phil Luecking, Colin Webb, Jason Swanson, Matt Solon, Rob D'Arco. Second Row: Scot Svedja, Matt 
Zeller. Mike Graf, Terry Fallen, Brent Centlivre, Jeff Hebreard, Tim Nelson, Greg Rippon, Pete Ditmars, Chris Parsons, Mike Abern. Third Row: Joel Gershon, Geoff Hartman, Paul Padron, 
Scott Sherry, Erick Pfaucht, Andy Butkiewicz, Steve Mennecke, Rick Comer, Jon Chappell, Eric Cha, Marty Mellican, Andy Read, Dan Shupack. Fourth Row: Pat McRea, Andy Stevenson, 
Erick Mennecke, Ray Ploski, Mike Giebelhausen, Kaison Cha, Scott Ankeney, Scott Gollan, Scott Clemens, Ben Ting, Kris Ayura, Todd Kelley. 




Chapter Name 

Theta Xi 

Chapter Colors 

Blue, White & Red 

Chapter Flower 

Blue Lily 

Philanthropy 

Kidnap & Ransom 

for 

Habitat for Humanity 

Address 

205 E. Armory 



I 







Pike's Tradition Continues 

This year, Pi Kappa Alpha continued its tradition as one of 
U of I's strongest fraternities. Pikes were proud to an- 
nounce a pledge class of 30 men for the fall semester, a 
number which is high above the average for other fraterni- 
ties. In order to promote their house and ensure a good 
rush, Pikes produced a Pi Kappa Alpha Calendar, which 
consisted of pictures of sorority women from the U of I. 



Pikes also 
strength 
involvement 
service. This 
started a new 
conducting a 
clothes drive 
mas. To allow 
of the most 
clothes pos- 
placed drop 
of the sorori- 
pus and in 
residence 
the goods 
went to the 
County Salva- 
Pikes also re- 
awards this 
show their 
main a strong 
the U of I, 
the Chancellor 
Outstanding. 
achieve- 
also recog- 
Nationals,and 
awarded the 
standing Pi 
Chapter, 
very proud of 
of their mem- 




Chapter Name 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Nickname 

Pikes 

Chapter Colon 

Garnett & Gold 

Symbol 

Fire Truck 

Chapter Flower 

Golden Standard Tulip 

Philanthropies 

Numerous Charities 

Address 

102 East Chalmers 



showed their 
through their 
in community 
year, Pikes 
tradition by 
food and 
before Christ- 
the collection 
food and 
sible, Pikes 
boxes at most 
ties on cam- 
some of the 
halls. All of 
collected 
Champaign 
tion Army, 
ceived several 
year which 
ability to re- 
house. From 
Pikes received 
Award for the 
Pikes' 
ments were 
nized by their 
they were 
title of an Out- 
Kappa Alpha 
Pikes were 
the presence 
bers on most 



of the varsity sports on campus. Members of Pi Kappa Alpha 
are seen on the U of I football, basketball and softball 
teams. Pikes also upheld their tradition of a strong social 
calendar this year. They started off the year with their 
annual Pikes Pancake Breakfast on Bid Night. They also 
enjoyed exciting exchanges, including an Octoberfest cel- 
ebration with Alpha Chi Omega. 





Pi Kappa Alpha: First Row: JT Johns, Nate Mclaughin, Billy Galbuda, Eric Joyce. Second Row: David SApires, Adam Chappie, Rich Castillo, Aaron. Third Row: Nathan Conroy, Billy 
Heintz, RJ Delacruz, Matt Ehlers, Greg Willis, Curtis Regulus, Eric Williams, Mark Matthaie, Andy Binkowsi, John Roberston. Fourth Row: Mike Mazukelli, Rick Tybor, Aaron Bowman, 
Greg Karawan, Brian Rost, Jay Schiesser, Jerry Cameron, Adam Robinson, Brad Furfaro. Fifth Row: Todd Thorstenson, Brian Irwin, Justin Fierz, Brady Blaine, Chris Schule, Paul Matusiak, 
Ernie Schalanski, Todd Ofenloch, Brent Wartick. Sixth Row: Darin Repp, Jeremy McLaughlin, Matt Dannenfeldt, Matt Williams, Patrick Burke, Dave Olson, Brian Anast, Derek Wright, 
Dave Wolf, John Gray. 




Greeks 293 



n incrtn&e, in (avnrcncs>S> 



// 



GAMMA is 



a great way 

to make 

people more 

aware of 

alchohol 

related 

issues and 



GAMMA isn't just a Greek letter any- 
more. For the Greek system, it is a na- 
tional organization that stands for 
"Greeks Advocating the Mature Manage- 
ment of Alcohol." This group was 
founded on this campus in 1993 with the 
idea of making students aware of 
the dangers of being irresponsible 
when consuming alcohol and to teach 
alcohol awareness. 

The committee is 
made up of one rep- 
resentative from 
each fraternity and 
sorority on campus. 
The group is broken 
down into an execu- 
tive committee of six 
members and each 
of these members is 
in charge of a com- 
mittee that is made up of the rest of the 
GAMMA members. The group meets once 
a week, usually on Tuesday nights, at a 
different fraternity or sorority each time. 

GAMMA is involved in many activities 
on campus. The group is involved in Alco- 
hol Awareness Week and was responsible 
for the car crash scene portrayed on the 
Quad last semester. GAMMA is also spon- 
soring a safe spring break where it pro- 



'}fl4tnre 
StnAents 4re 

tAe key 



motes fun without alcohol. The members 
distribute flyers to students on campus 
about being responsible when consuming 
alcohol. They sponsor speakers from the 
Panhellenic and Interfraternity Councils to 
speak to different houses on campus about 
alcohol related issues. GAMMA also pro- 
motes a "Perfect Party" through the Greek 
Management Council, which is a party 
that serves no alco- 
hol, just fun. 

Since GAMMA is 
a national organiza- 
tion, the U of I chap- 
ter sends some of its 
members to the na- 
tional convention to 
bring back to campus 
new ideas and ways 
to get students to be 
much more mature 
when alcohol is involved. A speaker from 
the national headquarters came to campus 
to speak with GAMMA members last se- 
mester to relay more information. 

"GAMMA is a great way to make 
people more aware of alcohol related is- 
sues and alternatives to drinking," said 
Kim Schimmel, GAMMA President, and 
sophomore in LAS. 

— Story by Debbie Williams 



alternatives 



to drinking. 



n 



— Kim 



Schimmel 




-Veronica Alvarez 




jLsf im Schimmell, junior in LAS, Mindy 
/^JEdidin, junior in Agriculture and 
Marc Devar, junior in LAS, flipped through 
papers during a GAMMA meeting that was 
beingheld at the Kappa Alpha Theta soror- 
ity house. 

SY arolyn Pershke, junior in CBA, 

\^/ Stephanie Manning, sophomore in 

CBA, Mindy Edidin, junior in Agriculture and 

Marc Devar, junior in LAS, converse during a 

GAMMA meeting that was being held. 




-Veronica Alvarez 



GAMMA 295 








Chapter Name 

Sigma Gamma Rho 

Chapter Colors 

Gold and Blue 

Philantropy 

The March of Dimes, The 

Salvation Army and the 

Douglass Center 



EAr 




Chapter Name 

Sigma Lambda Gamma 

Sorority Inc. 

Nickname 

Gammas 

Chapter Colors 

Shocking Pink & 

Majestic Purple 

Symbol 

Purple Panther 

Chapter Flower 

Pink Rose 

Philanthropy 

Numerous Local Charities 




Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority: First Row: Kathy McGowan, Torya Britter, Veronica Brown, Catriese Henning, Laura Taylor. Second Row: Kay Malone. Sheila Currie, Natalie Hub! 
Adrianne Flynn, Grenita Hal!. Third Row: Lisa Cooper, April Williams. Melinda Patterson, Patrice Jackson, Jai Barber, Dennie Rogers, Anita Stubbs. 




Sigma Lambda Gamma: First Row: Elizabeth Pichardo, Yesenia VillaSenor, Fabiola Flores, Cecilia Abundis, Elizabeth Fernandez, Cintia Ortiz. Second Row-: Ester Cabrales. Melissa 
Garcia, Maria De La Cruz, Rita Hinojosa, Oralia Gomez, Anya Marzynski, Irlanda Jimenez, Leticia Zavala. Third Row: Heather Rodriguez. Leticia Nache. Nicole Buchanan. Ennedy Rivera. 
Annissa Kuki Aguilar, Sylvia Sanchez, Danielle Landron, Jennifer Mueller, Joy Watkins, 





Sigma Tau Gamma Seniors: First Row: Bob Murphy. Aaron Kaka, Roger Chiu, John Urbanie 
Ryan Bassler. Not Pictured: Doug Calhoun, Pete Jin, Jim Michel, Steve Ohlhaber. 



, Brad DuPont. Second Row: Mike Myung, Mike Sudduth, Dan Pawlak, Charles Parsons, 




Sigma Tau Gamma: First Row: Cam Travelli, Mike Scibienski, Rob Abrams, Joe Tucker, Jeremy Jurek, Edhar Aranda. Second Row: Roger Chu, Marc Hedlund, Kevin Browuell, Mark 
Denton, Bryce Fuller, Alyx Parker, Aaron Kaka, Brent Johnson, Kevin Liu. Third Row: Ian Ackerman, Scott Woods, Matt Farley, Brian Napoleon, Matt Brown, Mike Myung, Dan Pawlak, 
Tony Comerio, Jum Van Zeyl, Mike Sudduth, Brian McGinn, Mike Pugh. Fourth Row: Andy Voytko, Charles Parsons. Bob Murphy, John Urbaniec, Ryan Bassler, Ed Higgins, Tom Skinner, 
Brad DuPont, Matt Thai, Tim Foersom. Not Pictured: Jeff Bruggerman, Doug Calhoun, Peter Jin, Chris Kuebrich, Jim Michel, Steve Ohlhaber, Joel Petry, Jamie Shaples, Rob Walter, 




Chapter Name 

Sigma Tau Gamma 

Nickname 

Sig Taus 

Chapter Colors 

Silver and Blue 

Philanthropy 

Various 

Organizations, 

including 
Adopt-a-School 

Address 
47 E. Chalmers 



Greeks 297 



1 1 



! ;; ) 






Chapter Name 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Nickname 

Sig Eps 

Chapter Colors 

Blue & Old Gold 

Chapter Flower 

Iris 

Philanthropy 

Adopt-a-School 

Address 
1105 S. Fourth 





xn 



Sigma Pi: First Row: John Vivian, Brian Eades, Curt Bradshaw, Bryan Weinert, James Oh, Pat Callahan, Jamie Nance. Second Row: Bob Wolfe, Glenn Hull, Graham Morin, 
Paul Bruns, Rob Parker, Mike Stokes, Andy Heisinger, Johnny Oh, Paul Cooper, Larry Lu, Jeff Ellish, Mark Ryan. Third Row: David Nestler, Mark Laechel, Erik Spitzner 
Smith Siromaskul, Ben Amponin, Allan Baptist, Julian Wolhardt, Aaron Huizenga. Fourth Row: Pat Leen, Chris Minor, John Rottschalk, Chris Anderson, Andy Kotowicz, 
Chris Godar, Herbie Chen, Jim Nee, Andy Karsen. Fifth Row: Justin Wilson, Gus Vasquez, Jason Scales, Chuck Shim,. Dave Store, Steve Geissler, Joe Shin, Bob Ruoti, 
Mark Ramirez, Pete Basler. Sixth Row: James Peterson, Jay Auslander, Pat McBride, Brian Kreening, Serge Cherny, Alberto Sainz, Sean Lee, Scott Kurth, Eric Kueetschner, 
Chris Hancock, Greg Cieslo, Brian Jones, Dave Mazeska, Chuck Parry, Nick Canrelis, Evan Glazer. 




Chapter Name 

Sigma Pi 

Nickname 

Sig Pis 

Chapter Colors 

Lavendar & Gold 

Symbol 

Owl 

Chapter Flower 

Lavendar Orchid 

Address 

901 S. Second 




OA0 





Phi Delta Theta: First Row: Dishwasher, Matt Stegen, Erik Herzog, Brad Masterson, Scott Noble, Dan Manfredo, Jesse Seidman, Michael Lindquist, Walt Draney, Matt 
Beverly, Jason Bretz, Steven Brasky, Angel Capulong, Lazar Bityou. Second Row: Jim Connors, Kent Stoner, Marc Finkle, Doug McCaffrey, Mark Chilton, Darren Benjamin, 
leff Yuknis, Chris Griffin, Michael Sullivan, Steve Jenson, Shane Foley, John Cannon, Tom Nelson. Third Row: Pat Burke, Dave Condron, David Noonan, Blake Hess, Eric 
Wippo, Jim Uemura, Scott Hartman, Drew Lee, Brian Dooley, Dan Yonan, Paul Shaya, Ryan Kommers, Jim Dimmick, Jason Stephens, Andrew Gaunt, Marc Marini, Jeff 
instrom, Matt Warren. Fourth Row: John Mitts, Chris Warner, Chapin Rose, Ken Nichols, Brian Martello, Kurt Miscinski, Mike Johns, Michael Mahomey, Tony Soong, Chuck 
Moback, Brett Siglund, Kevin Coleman, Jeff Paris, Mark Ferro, John Krickenbrink, Chris Bailey, Tom Petermann, Tony Millar, Brian Murnane, Eric Dankowski, Jamie Straza, 
3rad Danneggar, Craig Beachler, Tim Coleman. 



Chapter Name 

Phi Delta Theta 

Nickname 

Phi Delts 

Chapter Colors 

Blue & White 

Chapter Flower 

White Carnation 

Address 
309 E. Chalmers 



tat tutent Actps ck&rity 



•si 



"It paid off 

because we 

had a 

great crowd 

and the 

acts were 

incredible." 

— Danielle 

Peabody 



yit* 



"And the winner of the third annual 
Alpha Phi King of Hearts is Phi Kappa 
Tau's Garrett Hohimer," said the Alpha Phi 
announcers Maggie Savarino, senior in LAS 
and Christy Connell, sophomore in CBA. 
With crown in place, Garrett took his royal 
walk across the stage with escort Amy 
Robinson, junior in CBA. 

Alpha Phi set up their philanthropy, King 
of Hearts, three years ago to present a "night 
of improv" featuring 
fraternity men, who 
are critiqued by four 
judges. Talents rang- 
ing from piano play- 
ing to the infamous 
"Underpants Dance" 
marked just a few of 
the acts. Garrett 
Hohimer, freshman 
in FAA and the win- 
ner of this year's con- 
test, sang a cappella, 

danced to a Harry Connick, Jr. song 
and recited a Shakespeare sonnet to 
escort Robinson. 

"There's a pretty wide variety of acts. 
The performers all did a really good job 
and were very enthusiastic," said Holly 
Hulina, junior in Education. 

Fraternities were allowed to enter one 
man from their house to try to claim the 
title "King of Hearts," but succeeding at 
the talent portion was not the only thing 
needed to win the crown. Contestants 
were subjected to an interview consist- 
ing of three questions ranging from most 
embarrassing moments to how to spend 
one million dollars on the Saturday be- 
fore the contest. The other element of the 
men's scores was their house's participa- 
tion, which was a percentage of the men 
from their house who attended King of 



flltt just 4 
entertdintu cnt 



Hearts, held in Lincoln Theater. 

"Participation this year was reall) 
good," said Megan Mead, a junior in CBA 
"I was impressed by the number of peoph 
who came." 

The scores are compiled, and of the \ L 
acts, five men advanced to the final round 
consisting of an impromptu question ir 
front of the crowd. While the scores wer 
tabulated, the Xtension Chords enter 
tained the crowd 
The top three final 
ists were then an- 
nounced. The mer 
were all rewardec 
with donated gifts 
from sponsors sucr 
as Record Servica 
and the Bermud 
Onion. 

"King of Hearts" 
was not just a nighl 
of comedy and en 
tertainment. It was held as Alpha Phi' 
annual philanthropy. The money raised 
from the ticket sales and the entry fee 
was donated to the Alpha Phi Founda 
tion. The Foundation supports heart and 
lung research. 

The Publicity Chair of King of Hearts, 
Danielle Peabody, sophomore in LAS, said, 
"I don't think that King of Hearts could 
have gone any better this year. A lot of hard 
work went into it, and it paid off because 
we had a great crowd and the acts were 
incredible. Best of all, we raised a lot of 
money for the Alpha Phi Foundation." 

The 1995 King of Hearts was the most 
successful yet for the Alpha Phi Founda- 
tion due to the amount of fraternity and 
community participation. 

— Story by Anna Nommensen & 
Jennifer Williams 



s reeks 




*7/7 a ^ nan Brammeier, sophomore in LAS, 
f ]/ and Ben Jackets, sophomore in FAA, 
place bologna on their chests during the 
King of Hearts competition. Each frater- 
nity was allowed to enter one participant 
in the contest. 

*y^ en Jackets, sophomore in FAA, holds a 
J[^> broccoli stalk and sings an "Ode to 
Produce " during the King of Hearts compe- 
tition in Lincoln Tlieater. King of Hearts be- 
gan three years ago to raise money to help 
fund heart and lung research. 




-Dave Wolkowitz 



«-^t on Sheridan, sophomore in LAS, plays 
*£*-) the guitar while Alan Papier, 
sophomore in LAS, sings along. Tlte duo sang 
two songs, one of which was an original. 



-Dave Wolkowitz 



King of Hearts 301 






Triangle: First Row: Dave Dribin, Jeff Jungman, Enrique Ramirez, Jeremy Daily, Darren Shredder, MikeScelsi, Benjamin Ernst, Matt England, Mike Mason. Second Row: Corry Campbell. 
Nic Holtz, Joe Lanter, Rhett Star, Mike Mason, Mike Steffes, Dave Stachowiak, Johny Lamb, Paul Sternhell, Chris Vazzana. Tom Edward. Carlos Pjss<>. Steve Zuiker. Third Row: Rich 
Davey, Kevin Gerlecki, Bryan Luke, Leyland Torres, Josh Kinsley, Jeff Novak, Eric Haberichter, Jason Horvath, Brian Webber, Tom Manson, John Kapp, Jeff Haye, Chris Maurer. Ward 
Hand, Riz Nicholas. Fourth Row: Miguel Buddie, Kevin Moloney, Todd Mitchell, Sean Jean, John Reichert, Gabbin Murphy, Andres Ochoa. Bob King, Joe Kirkey, Tom Thompson, 
Matt Holden, Anthony Vicich, Seth Selkow. 








Chapter Name 

Triangle 

Chapter Colors 

Old Rose & Gray 

Chapter Flower 
White Chrysanthe- 
mum 
Philanthropy 
Numerous Charities 
Address 
112 E. Daniel 




Triangle Seniors: Benjamin Ernst. David Dribin, Mike Mason, Matt England, Jeremy Daily, Jeff Haye, Chris Maurer, Eric Haberichter, Kevin Grelecki. Dave Stachowiak, Jeff Jungman, 



302 Greeks 






Chapter Name 

Phi Kappa Theta 

Nickname 

Phi Kaps 

Chapter Colors 

Gold, White & Cardinal 

Purple 

Chapter Flower 

Red Tea Rose 

Philanthropy 

Mud Volleyball for 

American Cancer 

Society 

Address 

1106 S. Third 



Phi Kappa Theta: First Row: Jared Ross. Nick Olesen, Dennis Casimirom, Dave Laird, Thomas Kostal, Kevin Evernham, Kurt Klemm, Chris Gregory, Ross Towse. Second Row: Russell 
Sherman. Brice Hahn, Tim Sula, Aaron Wood, John Mehochko, Adam Krauss, Paul Predovic. Pete Blackmon. Third Row: Biraju Patel, Grew Wilems, John Lash, Bryan Imhoff, Greg 
Link, Aaron Stillman, Gary Bianzon. Fourth Row: Mike Holmquist, Greg Newell, Lucas Tryggestad, John Logli, Sean Gugnani, Mike Mead, Brett Berke. Fifth Row: Mark Zalewski, Adam 
Johnson, Ken Rustin, Bryan Duray, Anthony Pisterzi, Andy Burton, Mark Scherer. Sixth Row: Lance Wahl, Ed Balon, Darren Mungerson, Rob Wojciak, Jon Phillips, Chris Beason, Dave 
Sanders. Kevin Glen. 




Greeks 303 






Chapter Name 

Phi Kappa Psi 

Nickname 

Phi Psis 

Chapter Colors 

Orange & Blue 

Chapter Flower 

Jacqueminot Rose 

Philanthropy 

Numerous Charitable 

Organizations 

Address 
911 S. Fourth 




Phi Kappa Psi Seniors: First Row: Steve Duffy, Pat Daley, Dan Barry, John Campbell, Dave Czech, Doby. Second Row: Charlie Zosel, Doug Richards. Gino Campanell I 
Jim Abbott, Mike Wagner, Matt Hammel, Dmitry Shapiro. Third Row: Joe Mulcrone, Mike Petros, Chris Stori. Dan Kelly. Chris Burroughs. Craig Howard, Dan Emrich. Jamcl 
Krzeminski, Time Meana. Scott Gilford, Bill Metes, Kevin Harding, Chris Dell. Bill Kowalski. 




Phi Kapppa Psi: First Row: James Krzeminski, Doug Richards, Craig Howard, Dan Emrich, Doby. Second Row: Pat Daley, Graham Yost, Tony Abbott. Chris Dell. T. Patrick Byrne 
Jim Abbott, Bill Metes, Chris Burroughs, Matt Hammel, Mike Wagner, Bill Kowalski. Third Row: Steve Duffy, John Campbell, Matt Daley, Kevin Harding, Afdo Aranda, Dan Barry. Tin 
Meana, Matt Woltman, Mark DuBrock, Dave Rooney, Dave Czech, Matt Olson, Martin Kelly, Mike France. Ed Brignon, Gino Campanelli. Steve Casper. Scon Gifford, Brian Monahan 
Mike Kurtzman, Dan Kelly, Mike Petros. Charlie Zosel. Fourth Row: Ryan Keegan, Dan Beedon. John Spiggos, Chris Weddige, Dave Losanke, Kevin Fitch, Jason Cowles. Mike Stare 
Joe Boyd, Marty Brennan, Mike Palmer, Steve Doench, Adam Arling, Bob Rosing, Matt Modica, Ed Campbell. C.J. Regan, Jason Napolitano. Steve Nickas, Gavin Klaus. Brian Boyd 
Ryan Evans, Andy Lynch, Mike Kelly, Pat Keenan, Joe Zinchuk, Joe Mulcrone, Joe Casey. Fifth Row: Matt Sullivan. Sean O'Reilly. 



OKT 





Chapter Name 

Phi Kappa Tau 

Nickname 

Phi Taus 

Chapter Colors 

Harvard Red & Old Gold 

Symbol 

Star 

Chapter Flower 

Yellow Carnation 

Philanthropy 

Numerous Organizations 

Address 

310 E. Gregory 



iT/y 



si Upsilon: First Row: Chris Youngren, Mike Trakselis, Doug Barnes, Cole Lanham, Jordan Zimberoff, Todd Stone. Erik Sundquist. Second Row: Tad Huntington, Jon 
'esterhoff. Doug Britton. Matt Wienke, Gil Herrera, Matt Plavcan, Matt Mattilla, Pat Godfrey, Eric McVey, Mario Zelaya. Third Row: Chad House, Brian DeVerger, Steve 
urtzik, Jeremy Youngren, Gabe Hernandez. Not Pictured: Michael Anichini, Jim Anichini, Jason Borucki, Mark Coffey, Tom Docnitz, Dave Igaravidez, Chris Lawrence, 
ason Martin, Andy Wemmer, Jeff Wierer, Paul Repmann 




*A 



18 



Chapter Name 

Psi Upsilon 

Nickname 

Psi Us 

Chapter Colors 

Gold & Garnet 

Symbol 

Owl 

Philanthropy 

Habitat for Humanity 

Address 

313 E. Armory 






X The Interfraternity 
Council is the govern- 
ing body of the fraterni- 
ties on campus. 




Interfraternity Council: First Row: Jim Connell, Mike Shannon, Chris Kutsor. Second Row: Alberto Sainz, Michael Anichini, Mike Resce, Tom Marck.1 




Tricia Marino is the secretary of the IFC office. 



306 Organizations 







Panhellenic Council: First Row: Kelly Harvey, Michelle Blake, Craig Jackson, Tina Green, Marie O'Connor, Elaine Oh. Second Row: Joella Foster, Sarah Camper, Megan Feeney, 
Gayle Silagyi, Carmen Ahlers. 




X The Panhellenic 
Council is the govern- 
ing body of the sorori- 
ties on campus. 

X Panhellenic Council 
was the 1993 recipient 
of the National Pan- 
hellenic Conference 
Overall Excellence 
Award. 

% The Greek women 
consistently maintain 
an All-Sorority GPA 
which is above the All- 
Women's GPA. 

X Panhellenic Council 
contributes to the com- 
munity through its re- 
cycling efforts, commu- 
nity and campus clean- 
ups and the organiza- 
tion and planning of 
events such as the AIDS 
Walk. 

X The Council imple- 
mented Adopt- A-School 
Mentor program in 
1993. This program has 
expanded to five local 
schools in order to fos- 
ter one-on-one relation- 
ships with grade school 
children. 



Organizations 307 



able of Contents 






Agribusiness Association 


320 


Alpha Kappa Psi 


321 


Alpha Lambda Delta 


320 


Alpha Zeta 


321 


AIChE 


322 


ASCE 


342 


Army ROTC 


323 


ACM 


322 


Atius Sachem 


310 


Beta Alpha Psi 


311 


Block I 


323 


Chi Epsilon 


329 


Daily Illini 


312 


Delta Sigma Pi 


328 


Engineering Council 


326 


Epsilon Delta 


334 


The Girls Next Door 


351 


Golden Key 


328 


Horticulture Club 


329 


Illini Judo Team 


332 


Illini Pride 


332 


Illini Union Board 


333 


Illio 


314 


IDSA 


338 


Interfraternity Council 


306 


The Issue 


336 


LAS Council 


338 



Ma Wan Da 


339 


Mortar Board 


339 


Panhellenic Council 


307 


The Other Guys 


347 


Phi Gamma Nu 


340 


Phi Tau Sigma 


340 


Pre-Law Club 


341 


Presby House 


341 


Residence Hall Association 


343 


SAMS 


344 


Sigma Alpha Iota 


344 


Society of Engineers 


345 


Star Course 


335 


Student Ambassadors 


346 


Student Alumni Association 


350 


SGA 


345 


Varsity Men's Glee Club 


333 


Volunteer Illini Projects 


352 


Women's Glee Club 


351 


Women's Golf Team 


317 


WPGU 


318 



<5T 

K^ he Illio would like to extend a personal thank you 
to all of the organizations that have continued their 
support of the University of Illinois' yearbook through- 
out the years. 




! 



X Atius and Sachem are 
sophomore and junior activi- 
ties honoraries. 

| Students must demonstrate 
outstanding leadership ability 
in diverse extracurricular ac- 
tivities to be selected for mem- 
bership. 

X One of the most active 
honoraries on campus, mem- 
bers plan events together 
throughout the year, includ- 
ing "Comedy on the Quad" 
during Homecoming, "Dad's 
Night Out" during Dad's 
Weekend and the annual 
"Mom's Day Sing", a campus 
tradition. 

£ The mission of Atius-Sa- 
chem is to promote and recog- 
nize student leadership across 
the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign campus. 



M\\jc, Sachom 




Sachem: First Row: Al Groner, Michael Kleinkemper, Shawn Storbakken, HaKung Wong, Nehal Bhatt. Second Row: Jennifer Sherlock, Jason Tompkins, Shanna Achord, Ang 
Moore, Amanda Lorenz. Third Row: Brian Basch, Jennifer Flynn, Meg Webster, Athena Theodorakis. Fourth Row: Sara Campion, Katy Stokes. Fifth Row: Bill Orkin, Cliff Peters 
Matt Goben, Ed Kim, Tammy Mushrush, Kathy Altom, Lori Allaman. Not Pictured: Heather Parmelee. 




310 Organizations 



Atius: First Row: David Arenberg, Christine Mathieson, Cecilia Chang, Daisie Yu, Sasha Thompson. Second Row: Sara Rexroat, Joan Mocek, Julie Frederick, Jodi Kawada, Julie Klein Priya 
Jenveja, Kathy Axe. Third Row: Jessica DeBruin, Kristen Maslowski, Molly Tarter, Richard Stockton, Alison Begor. Fourth Row: Aaron Wilken, Brooke Scigousky, David Zissman, Michael 
Mclntyre, Mark Wasik, Jeff Brown. Advisor missing from photo: Heidi Gaddey, Sarah Potter, Stephanie Rhodes. 



5e/fa Alpha V<\ — 

% Beta Alpha Psi is a national accounting fraternity which recognizes the elite accounting students at many 
universities. 

\ Our executive board's main focus is to introduce the members to a broad range of accounting and related career 
paths through a variety of presentations hosted by both public accounting firms and private companies. 

£ The University of Illinois chapter is the founding chapter of Beta Alpha Psi. 

\ Our members participate in the organization through involvement in committees and attending presentations. 

j: Some activities include firm presentations, football tailgates, happy hours and field trips. 







Seta Alpha Psi: Treasurer— Ronda Schmalz, Vice President of Membership—Nancy Gaffner, Corresponding Secretary-Jesica Grissett, Vice Presidentof Programs-Troy Oder, President-Ryan 
tern, Recording Secretary— Kai Tse. 



Organizations 311 



J The Daily Illini is the 124-year-old inde- 
pendent student newspaper of the University 
of Illinois, one of a few student newspapers 
with paid circulation and home delivery. 

£ The DI's staff consists almost entirely of 
students who serve as reporters, editors, pho- 
tographers, graphic artists and advertising 
account representatives. Many use the skills 
developed at The Daily Illini to become top 
professionals in the field of communications. 

£ The newspaper attempts to cover the im- 
portant events of the University of Illinois 
community from entertainment to univer- 
sity administration to student information to 
world, national and local news. 

^ The DI is the recipient of many prestigious 
awards including the Best of Show Award at 
the 1994 ACP Convention in New Orleans 
and a First Place Mark of Excellence for the 
Midwest Region from the Society of Profes- 
sional Journalists. 




Tlie Dnilif Ulini Editorial Staff: First Row: Joel Rennich, Niki Ziegler, Michael Dizon, Rebecca Johnson, Brian Zents, Mike Helfgot. Second Row: Kellv McEv 
Ryan Smith, Sharon Farlow, Michelle Collins, Elaine Richardson, Barbara Iverson, Cori Faklaris, Carlos Miranda. 



... 




Tlie Daily Illini Staff: First row: Veronica Alvarez, Joel Rennich, Sarah Farr, Raven Hill, Courtney Challos, Stacey Jackson. Second row: Chris Yu, Dave Stinton, Michael Dizon, Niki Ziegler, Rebecca Johnson 
Brian Zents. Third row: Jamahl Episocokhan, Mike Helfgot, Ted Liu, Kelly McEvers, Sharon Farlow, Elaine Richardson, Matt Grotto. Fourth row: John Lo, Cori Faklaris, Will Leitch, Mike Cetera, Ryan Smith, 
Jeff Agrest, Michelle Collins, Mike Karr, Dave Blumberg, Barbara Iverson, Kris Kudenholdt, Ernie Perez, George Eckart, Carlos Miranda. 



312 Organizations 




TJie Daily Ulini Advertising Staff: First Row: Nancy Elliott, Chris Marty, Bernadette Wnek, Patty Burleson, Matt Lamphear, Jerry Courtney, Karthi Gandhi, Dana 
folomeo, Bob Meredith. Second Row: Gina Perino, Kim Habisohn, Danielle Landron, Damon Shipe, Sally Benson, Amy McClusky, Amy Hannus. 




Vlarge Donoghue, a reporter for The Daily Ulini, is hard at work in the office. 



Organizations 313 



£ The Illio is the University of Illinois 
yearbook. 

$ The Illio is divided into two staffs: 
editorial and business. The editorial 
staff is responsible for producing the 
book. This includes writing all copy, 
taking every picture, completing each 
page layout and editing the final prod- 
uct. The business staff insures the 
book's financial success by selling or- 
ganization and greek spreads, organiz- 
ing senior picture sittings and selling 
the book itself. 

J The Illio staff is composed of an edi- 
tor-in-chief and a business manager 
who are responsible for hiring their 
own staffs. 

| The 1992 edition of the Illio was 
awarded the National Pacemaker 
Award. This is the highest honor any 
collegiate yearbook can earn. 




Illio Editorial Staff: Greg Lewickyj, Rick Widmer, Lee Anne Pauiauski, Kristina Castillo, Erin Evans, Debbie Williams, Peggy Christensen, Rvan Almn 
Pam Riley, Amara Rozgus, Toi Walker, Carol Frantilla, Suk Ju Yun, Dan Ryan, Matt Grotto, Monica Soltesz, Claudia Rodriguez, Jill Kogan, Emma 
Brennan, Anna Nommensen, Jennifer Williams, Colleen Christensen. Not Pictured: Vida Riskus, Eric Schmidt, Jennifer Arendarczyk. 




Illio Editors: Rick Widmer, Matt Grotto, Debbie Williams, Jill Kogan, Carol Frantilla, Ryan Almon, Peggy Christensen, Monica Soltesz, Pam Riley. Amara 
Rozgus. Not Pictured: Vida Riskus, Eric Schmidt. 



314 Organizations 




Up Production Staff: First Row: Anna Nommensen, Colleen Christensen, Erin Evans. lllio Writing Staff: Greg Lewickyj, Krishna Castillo, Jennifer Williams, Emma Brennan, Toi Michelle Walker, Dan Ryan. 
?cond Row: Claudia Rodriquez, Suk Ju Yun. 




lio Business Staff: First Row: Julie Kearny, Mike Drenth. Second Row: Joe DeMarco, Paul Reily, Anil Mansikhaui. 




like Drenth, a member of the lllio Business Staff, is hard at work filing yearbook receipts. The business staff is responsible for the financial success of 
\e yearbook. 



Organizations 315 



X Student Advance- 
ment Committee was 
organized in 1988 to as- 
sist the Offices of Ag De- 
velopment, Alumni and 
Corporate Relations in 
raising friends and 
funds for the College of 
Agriculture. 

| SAC's membership 
includes approximately 
30 undergraduate stu- 
dents representing all 
disciplines in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 

J For the past six years, 
SAC members have as- 
sisted with the College 
of Agriculture's annual 
Phone-A-Thon, which 
involves more than 150 
student and faculty vol- 
unteers, alumni and 
friends of the college in 
raising more than 
$100,000 annually to 
support College of Ag- 
riculture programs. 

J The Ag Alumni- 
Deans Club Pavilion 
Party, Ag Open House 
and Faculty Work Week 
are among the other 
campus events hosted 
by SAC. 

J Events such as 
LeaderShape's Team 
Challenge Course, holi- 
day caroling and a 
spring cookout for new 
members round out 
SAC's busy calendar. 







Student Advancement Committee: First Row: Meg Webster, Joe Webel, Katy Stokes, Derek Busboom, Tracy Boe, Andrew Spraque, Lori Aliaman, Jim Painter, Jeana McAllister. Second Row: 
Mindy Elvidge, Becky Hollis, Stephanie Rhodes, Sasha Thompson, Jacki Atkins, Kim Hammond, Lisa Gillett, Sarah Schilling, Cliff Peterson, Jon Heyen, Brad Wolter, Jason Tompkins, Jeff 
Brown, Erin Winnett. Third Row: Arnie Sair, Jody McCormick, Carrie Taets, Bill Bodine, Darren Havens, Nick Block, Kevin Monk. Not pictured: Kim Bauer, Sarah De Meyer, Mick Lykins,' 
Nate Miller, Pam Christman. 




Organizations 



WomonS 

&o\f loam 



' 


• • 




,-■-■■ 


i^Bp^^B>M%.<.--< 


■ft «m 1 ' w it 1 


■ * 


1 • • m • • . . 


"|A| 




| Three of the last four 
Big Ten medalists have 
been Illini golfers. 

X Illinois' last three Big 
Ten performances have 
been its best ever with a 
third place finish in 
1992, 1993 and 1994. 

X The team's lowest 
round record has been 
a 300 (best 4 of 5 scores) 
at the Iowa Invitational 
in 1993. 

% The honor of having 
the highest GPA of 4.25 
was awarded to the Illini 
golfers at the 1994 
Scholar-Athlete Banquet. 

X Illinois' tradition 
continues to grow 
for former athletes 
with three-time All- 
American, Renee 
Heiken and All-Big Ten 
golfer, Lia Biehl quali- 
fying for the 1995 La- 
dies Professional Golf 
Association season. 




omen's Golf Team: First Row: Michelle Lin, Jacqueline Rubin, Christine Garrett, Becky Biehl, Ashley Webb. Second Row: Coach Paula Smith, Breinnan Pirk, Jennifer Lynch, Karen 
rmazin, Kristie Treseler, Kourtney Mulcahy, Undergraduate Student Coach Wendy Evans. 



Organizations 317 



WF&V 



$ WPGU 1 07. 1 , The Planet, is a 24-hour com- 
mercial radio station primarily run by stu- 
dents of the University of Illinois, as part of 
the Illini Media Company. 

| Besides the sought-after On Air or DJ 
positions, over 100 students of varying ma- 
jors work behind the scenes as student sales 
representatives, copywriters, news and sports 
reporters, engineers, production, talent and 
producers and marketing and promotions staff. 

£ The Planet provides unique opportunities 
for students to learn about radio and the 
broadcasting industry by providing a profes- 
sional, functioningbusiness environment while 
they are surrounded by people their own age. 

£ The Planet also recognizes the importance 
of giving something back to the community. 
WPGU participates in many annual charity 
events such as Operation Santa Claus, Ducks 
4 and blood drives. 





318 Organizations 



)\<&OCAdti\OV\ 






ill 



% ABA enhances professional develop- 
ment and leadership skills of agribusiness 
students. 

X Agribusiness Association allows stu- 
dents to acquire firsthand knowledge of 
companies and industries in their field of 
interest. 

X ABA sponsors a mentor program allow- 
ing members to gain hands-on experience 
by spending a day with a professional in 
their field of interest. 

% Agribusiness Association offers three 
annual scholarships through the parent 
NAMA chapters. 




AgriBfisiness Association: Shane Koonce, Angie Moore, Tom Courson, Katie Stokes, Jason Duzan, Nick Block. 



A-fph 



X Alpha Lambda Delta is a national soci- 
ety that honors academic excellence dur- 
ing a student's freshman year. 

X They were founded at the University of 
Illinois in 1924, and there are now more 
than 200 chapters nationwide. 

X Chapter activities include free tutoring 
to university students, the presentation of 
the Outstanding Teaching of Freshmen 
Awards and various service projects. 

X Membership is for life, and all members 
are encouraged to participate in both the 
tutoring programs and the philanthropy 
projects. 

X Sophomore members may compete for 
the JoAnne J. Trow Awards, and $3,000 
fellowships are awarded to seniors who 
plan to attend graduate school. 




: ; mizations 



Alpha Lambda Delta: First Row: Jen Ryan, Prabal Chakrabarti, Molly Gilbert, Sara Pocius. Second Row: Jessica DeBruin, Al; 
Shapiro, Gina Gottlieb, Joan Mocek. 




I Alpha Kappa Psi is a professional busi- 
ness fraternity whose goals are to promote 
brotherhood, professionalism and to fur- 
ther advance the careers of its members. 

X Each year the Epsilon Chapter of AK*F 
engages in many professional activities in- 
cluding guest speakers, field trips and fac- 
ulty parties. 

X This year, AK*F participated in many 
social and philanthropy events such as 
Barndance, Spring Formal, Walkout to 
other college chapters, sports events and 
Business Olympics. 



}ha Kappa Psi: First Row: Andy Nahumyk, Tom Loftus, Matthew Pryor, Steve Kim, Craig Saltzmann, Rommel Famatid, Jeff Hall, Peter Cho, Ed Kim 
:ond Row: Rochelle Mablilangan, Ann Kurian, Amy Gustafson, Amy Bogle, Julie Pesce, Rebecca Piepenbrink, Jenny Snyder, Monique Ruiz, Amy Wen, 
ce Au, Jennifer Rice, Kim Wolff Third Row: Carol Castelloni, Michelle Hacker, Carli Shaw, Sabrina Moscato, Marina Nudell, Candice Meng, Angela Yiu 
jrth Row: Melissa Ray, Kathy Parsons, Swati Shah, Shari Kowalewski, Sandra Moon, Sharon Kim, Julie Barney, Marion Nelson Fifth Row: Tandy Criner, 
oy Conway, Jim Braun, Dave Olsen, Amy Shoech, Ray Fashola, Lisa Hopkins, Russ Willis, Amit Sheth, Scott Choy, Jeanna Sykes Not Pictured: Chris 
tann, Jason Arndt, Jeff Bartik, Roger Bartos, Margie Burke, Suzanne Bye, Diana Chang, Kenny Cheung, Peggy Christensen, Gopi Daram, Shoma Das, Amy 
kstra, Paulina Elkins, Joy Finnegan, Kim Friese, John Garwal, Priya George, Julie Hahm, Diane Heidorn, Aileen Juson, Geegee Kan, Teri Kil, Jennifer 
>mans, Travis Leonard, Michelle Lichtenwalter, Jenny Manalo, Kim May, Megan Mead, Arnez Nisperos, Carla Ortega, Becky Petrinos, Tina Plankis, Josh 
berts, Chris Sorquist, Kristen Swigart, Donna Tarn, Jason Torf, Giao Trac, Brian Zaban, Mike Benoit, Connie Guo, Steve Ham, Gerald Huang, Christine 
nentl, Veronica Ruiz, Becky Lillrick, Sora Yi. 




X The Fraternity of Alpha Zeta was 
founded November 4, 1 897, on the campus 
of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 

X The Morrow Chapter of Alpha Zeta was 
chartered June 1, 1900. 

X Alpha Zeta is a professional service and 
honorary agricultural fraternity. 

X Members are selected from students who 
have demonstrated superior leadership 
and dedicated service to agriculture. 

X Alpha Zeta has over 94,000 alumni na- 
tionwide. 



aha Zeta: First Row: Lauri Stover. Second Row: Lance Golub, Janice Berbaum, Sheila Heide. Third Row: Chris Musselman, Ben Brockett, Julie Wetzel. Fourth 
w: Travis Walk, Mark Mohr, Brad Walk. 



Organizations 321 



I 



Aw\cr\oan \v\tfr\Mo of 



% The American Institute of Chemi- 
cal Engineers (AIChE) aims to pro- 
mote Chemical Engineering as a 
profession. 

\ AIChE provides out of classroom 
learning experiences and interac- 
tions in order to develop and pre- 
pare Chemical Engineering students 
for industry and academia. 

\ AIChE aims to create an environ- 
ment within the Chemical Engineer- 
ing Department that is conducive to 
learning. 

X AIChE provides students with 
the opportunity to meet other 
Chemical Engineering students in 
order to encourage teamwork. 

X AIChE provides programs to in- 
volve new and transfer students in 
departmental activities from the very 
beginning of their college careers. 




American Institute of Chemical Engineers: First Row: Athena Theodorakis, Julie Kaminski, Laura Minor, Gwen DeBrower. Second Row: Dan 
Kanernori, Niclas Scher, Karl Rutener, Doug Kanwischer, Chris Kalish. 



A^ocJiation for 



C-omv\i^\ 



iciff Machine*™ 



X The Association for Computing 
Machinery (ACM) services the 
computing community with many 
projects ranging from artificial in- 
telligence to digital hardware to 
software engineering. 

X ACM offers computing work- 
shops for all levels of competency. 

X ACM arranges for guest speak- 
ers from many facets of comput- 
ing. 

X ACM sponsors programming 
contests and other national confer- 
ences. 

X ACM arranges many social 
events including picnics, canoe 
trips, and game-playing competi- 
tions. 




322 Organizations 



Association for Computing Machinery: First Row: Ed Burns, Ben Gross, Dan Simms, Eric Adams. Second Row: Joseph Lasky, Jeff Thompson, Amy 
Ryan, Anand Patel, Mike Kreger. Third Row: Alan Braverman, Ryan Grant, Brandon Long, Luke Nosek, Jay Kreibich. 




X In 1867 the University 
was founded as a land-grant 
institution. One of the re- 
quirements of the land -grant 
university was the instruc- 
tion of Military Science. 
Therefore ROTC and the 
University of Illinois have a 
127 year partnership. 

| ROTC is not the presence 
of the military at the Uni- 
versity, but the presence of 
the University in the mili- 
tary. 

£ ROTC provides not only 
leadership opportunities, 
but money and scholarship 
opportunities as well. 



eio^fc 




X Block I is sponsored by 
Garcia's and the Illini Union 
Board. 

:f Block I is located on the 
forty yard line on the East 
side of the Stadium. 

| Block I has been a long- 
standing tradition for 84 
years. 

£ There are twenty-four 
blockheads on the commit- 
tee. 

X Block I has 1200 students 
participants. 



Block I: First Row: Laverne Coke, Renaldo Dixon, Candi Kairys. Second Row: Toni Wallace, Jeff Barnes, Lilac Epstein, Kristin Junkus, Katie Olson, Missy Smith. 
Third Row: Roger Aranda, Andrea Gonzalez, Julie Larsen, Gretchen Faulkner, Jorge Leon, Molly Smeltzer, Helen Bredenburg, Cari Simek, Mehul Patel. Fourth 
Row: Elizabeth Osterhage, Erica Nelson, Ryan Kniewel, Matt Rue, Ed Farwell, Mike Campbell, 



Organizations 323 



"It was as 

close to 

flying as I 

could get." 

— Scott 

Sim 



fove and fiey&nA, campus 

U of I sure has it all - including its own Pinzino, junior in Communications, and 
skydiving team. Yep, you read right. The secretary of Falling Illini said, "I wanted 
Falling Illini has been a club on campus since to try it once to be able to say that I had 
1990 when it was started by two male stu- done it. It was absolutely incredible - the 
dents interested in skydiving as a hobby. For freedom you got from letting yourself go. 
about two years the club stayed relatively I got hooked. It was much more of a 
small. In the fall semester of 1993 the club hit sporting aspect after that. It can be re- 
big time - some 700 students completed their lated to any other sport because it has 
first jump. This past year, the club size was specific techniques, too." 
approximately 180-200 students who trav- In addition, Sim explained, "It's a hard 
eled above and beyond. thing to describe. People expect it to be a 

Their skydiving site has been in 'roller coaster drop' type of feeling. Imag- 



Vandalia, located 
southwest of the 
U of I between 
Effingham and St. 
Louis. They have 
tried to skydive ev- 
ery Saturday and 
Sunday in the spring 
and fall semesters. 
Participation slows 
down in the winter 
due to weather 
conditions. 



J Mini tdke 4 
£Mn$ (tip 



ine floating on a 
cushion of air. You 
don't realize you are 
falling around 100- 
180 miles per hour, 
depending on body 
weight and position. 
It was as close to fly- 
ing as I could get. It 
really does involve 
horizontal control." 



In other words, 
don't knock it until you try it. Thousands 

Scott Sim, senior in LAS and president of students might have missed out on 
of Falling Illini, stated, "There was a [sky- that intense rush of adrenaline one could 
diving] club back in the late '70s; it was only have achieved by skydiving, 
really small, probably only four active "In one sense," said Brett Siweck, se- 
members. But that club might have been nior in Engineering, "there is nothing to 
banned from campus - no one really explain, yet if I had to describe it I would 
knows. They did a scandalous jump onto say this: Gary Busse (an actor) had tried 
the Quad. It was sketchy what they did to describe something and couldn't. He 
exactly. Our current aerial policy is prob- said something along the lines of 'It's like 
ably because of that. The policy holds trying to explain an orgasm to a seven 
that there is absolutely no landings on year old.' That's it - a phenomenal inter- 
campus without special permission." nal thing." And if that won't make you 

What was all the excitement about? look forward to 1995-96, then 

Well, skydiving was not just a hobby to nothing will, 

these members, it was a sport. David — Story by Kristina Castillo 



anizations 





— Derek Niedringhaus 

/* cott Sim, senior in LAS, gives a big 
t ^ y thumbs up as he readies himself to 
make the big leap. Sim has been a member of 
the Falling Illini for four years. 

rett Shveck, senior in Engineering, and 
Scott Sim, senior in LAS, help 
David Pinzino, junior in Communications, 
get ready to fall. This year, the club size 
reached approximately 180-200 students. 




-Derek Niedringhaus 



Falling Illini 325 



I 




moorm 




Oom 



c^\ 



% Engineering Council co- 
ordinates major campus- 
wide activities that benefit 
all engineering students. 

X They act as a unifying 
power and facilitate com- 
munications between all 43 
professional and honorary 
societies. 

X They provide student 
input to the Dean of the 
College of Engineering. 

X They promote student 
leadership and organiza- 
tional skills in a profes- 
sional environment. 

X The council consists of 
an executive board of thir- 
teen officers and one rep- 
resentative from each pro- 
fessional and honorary en- 
gineering society. 




Engineering Council: Front Row: Mark Schmitt, Kristin Eder, Gianni Cutri, Sandy Mitofsky, John Bozarth, Cecilia Chang. Second Row:Tiffany VanderVelde, Ashvin Babu, Jason Silcox. 
Brad Whitmore, Sarah Dolezal. Eric Hiller, Andrea Culumber, Eric Chamberlain. 




&£ti 


\2 iA A 




■ 1 K Ji I J 

Eim< 11 



Dean's Studet Advisory Committee: First Row: Eric Hiller, Meggan Fitzgerald, Pavan Kochar, Jeff Mikulins. 
Second Row: Jerry King, Chris Vazzana, Stephen groppel, Aaron Saak, Joshua Moore. Not Pictured: Kate 
Sherwood, Stephanie Ball, Brad Foster, Jason Schripsema. 



Engineering Open House: First Row-: Sarah Dolezal, Priya Rangaswamy, Jason Silcox, Kathy Cheng Chamcharus. 
Second Row: Jeffery Bong, Jehan Tsai, kristin Eder, Kevin Safford, Aime Frake, Courtney Acker, Sima Desai. Not 
Pictured: hear Shah, Ashvin Babu. 



326 Organizations 




National Association of Engineering Student Councils Committe: First Row; Neena Panigrahi, Dana Marcotte, Ashvin Babu, Maggie Sieffert, Kathy Cheng. Second Row: 
imanuele Picciola, Kristin Eder, Richard Stockton, Eric Chamberlain, Jet-Sun Lin, Aaron Saak. 




engineering Freshman Council: First Row: Kristine Forsythe, John Bozarth, Jeff 
look. Second Row: Dar-lon Chang, Eric Whisler, Tom Thompson, William Woo, 
eremy Knopow. 



Student Introduction to Engineering: First Row: Nick Stephens, 
Sarah Dolezi, Maureen Duhig. Second Row: Jason Leung, Joshua 
Trimble, Jeff Ross, Bryan Luke. 



Engineering Information Bureau: First Row: Nick Stephens, 
Maureen Duhig. Second Row: Chris George, Joshua Moore, Jeff 
Ross, Mark Schmitt. Not Pictured: Todd Pluene, Edward Ke. 




Engineering Open House Design Contest Committee: Front Row: Maggie Sieffert, Lathy Cheng, Paul 
Weston, Lasumi Iida, Susan Gallagher. Second Row: Erwin Veranza, Burak Tombuloglu, Edward Ke, 
Chris George, Joshua Moore, Joshua Trimble. 



Engineering Employment EXPO Committe: First Row: Neena Panigrahi, Sandy Mitofsky, Dana 
vlarcotte. Second Row: Kristin Eder, Emanuele Picciola, Rob Albers, Andre Peters, Erin Baker. Not 
3 ictured: Tiffany VanderVelde, Albert Tseng. 



Organizations 327 









p. 



c- 



f-fa S'isjyi 



a Pi 



X The international f r a ter nity 
of Delta Sigma Pi is a profes- 
sional business fraternity of 
more than 90 members who 
share the common bond of 
brotherhood and goals of pro- 
fessional success. 

X Our brotherhood is 
strengthed through social ac- 
tivities such as Barn Dance, 
Rose Formal, Canoe Trip, ath- 
letic events and brotherhood 
retreats. 

X Brothers donate their time 
to help community organiza- 
tions such as Ace Leukemia, 
Champaign Park District, 
American Nursery Home and 
Cunningham Children's 
Home. 




Delta Sigma Pi: First Row: M. Mclntyre, J. Rahn, E. Romano, J. Reitzel, S. Gerencher, K. Wendling, D. Webb, K. Rice, S. Katsaros. Second Row: J Weber, L. Lebo, T. Hillman,. 
S. Marx, P. Mierwinski, R. Decker, H. McDonough, K. Getz, S, Campion, E. Kenner, T. Meeker, J. Cazel, A. Smith. Third Row: S. Catlett, J. Brown, M. Lawson, C Denen, K. Hood. 
P. Richard, E. Francour, M. Mead, T. Kanke, A Mohamed, M. Iammartino. Fourth Row: D. Walter, P. Laesch, B. Pasdach, D. Mcclintic, B. Orkin, J. Foster, S. Mathews, A. 
Gustafson, C Klemm, K. Walters, R. Schmalz, L. Farrell, S. Wilson. Not Pictured: S. Allord, T. Anderson, M. Angio, L. Bauman, J. Berlet, R. Breitstein, J. Carmichael, J. Carsello, 
J. Debruin, E. Densmore,M. Dubey, L. Foley,J.Galante,J.Gilfand,J.Green, A Hernandez, S.Jacob, J. Kearney, M. Kennedy, T. Kerrigan, J. Koehn, M. Lane, E. Melnick, B. Meyers,' 
S. Michalek, A. Miller, S. Odenthal, J. Oh, N. Paulson, C. Radecki, E. Radke, J. Reiter, J. Romick, A. Rottman, A. Rovegno, B. Schemerhorn, B. Schuler, M. Shepard, J. Skinner ' 
C Starkey, M. Stevens, M. Sullivan, T. Veluz. 

■ 

Oioldon Kou 

National ftonor SocJ\cAm 



X Golden Key National 
Honor Society is a non-profit 
academic honors organiza- 
tion. 

X It recognizes and encour- 
ages scholastic excellence 
among students from all fields 
of study. 

X Membership is by invita- 
tion only and is limited to the 
top 15 percent of the junior 
and senior classes. 

X Golden Key provides ser- 
vices to the university and the 
outside community by per- 
forming various activities. 

X Scholarships are awarded 
each year on a local and na- 
tional level. 




328 Organizations 



Golden Key National Honor Society: First Row: Seema Chandarana, Gretchen Jokisch, Joanna Tweedy , Barb Andersen, Dr. Lois Meerdmkd 
(Advisor). Second Row: Debaish Chakrabarti, Lorien Ryan, Jeff McGaughneyi Briant Kelly. 



CM\ E^kKoh 




Chi Epsilon: First Row: Victor Van Santen, Cheryl Mock. Second Row: Jerry King, Chris Kroll, Ken Nickols. 



% SCHOLARSHIP, sucess in 
academic work, is a fundamen- 
tal requirement for Chi Epsi- 
lon members. 

% CHARACTER inspires re- 
spect and confidence and leads 
one to engage in worthwhile 
activities. 

X PRACTICALITY is the abil- 
ity to apply the principles of 
scientific knowledge to prob- 
lems which confront the prac- 
ticing civil engineer. 

X SOCIABILITY, the desire to 
join freely with others, is a qual- 
ity all Chi Epsilon members 
must have. 

X These words serve as the 
guideposts of Chi Epsilon in its 
quest for professional perfec- 
tion. 



ttort)cAjH\irc> CAvb 




X The Horiculture Club holds 
the annual flower and garden 
show on Mothers Weekend. 

X The Horticulture Club par- 
takes in community service 
activities. 

X It has several flower sales 
throughout the year. 

X It participates at the Agri- 
culture Open House. 

X It participates at the 
MACHS and ALCA competi- 
tions. 



Horticultue Club: First Row: Heather Steiner, Doug Dale, Beth Waldhauser, Craig Tanner. Second Row: Jody Walker, Lori Fehr, Dan Cargill, Rebecca Bonnan, Julie Berner, 
Gary Kling. Third Row: Scott Mozingo, Jodi Zeller, Rodney Eichen, Amy Malloney, Amy Frederiksen, Monica Fidler, Karen Weeks, Gayle Jones. Fourth Row: Jason Quigley, 
Derek Schrof, Michelle Antonietti, Rob Harper, Shane Kiaser, Robert Romanowski, Molly Giffen. 



Organizations 329 



kd ntt\mntt experience 



// 



in 



TheDI 



gives 

anyone the 

opportunity 

to see 

the inner 

workings of 

a truly 

professional 



newspaper 



// 



-Michael 



Dizon 



For 124 years The Daily Illini has offered 
students the opportunity to learn the media 
business as staff members of one of the nation's 
top-ranked daily newspapers. As we head 
into our 125th year providing independent 
student media the University of Illinois, the 
DI continues to cover Champaign, Urbana 
and the campus community while garnering 
regional and national honors. 

In February the DI took FIRST place in 
the 13th annual Illinois College Press Asso- 
ciation Conference in 
Chicago. 

The DI also took the 
Best of Show award at 
the Associated College 
Press/College Media 
Advisers conference. 
Three student staff 
members traveled to 
New Orleans for the 
event, which brings 
together many of the 
top college papers and 

their staffs to share ideas for improving con- 
tent, coverage, output and other aspects of 
newspaper production. 

"It was the ultimate learning experience," 
said Michelle Collins, junior in LAS and DI 
City-State Editor. "We not only had the op- 
portunity to see a new city and a new culture, 
but we had the opportunity to see other pa- 
pers and learn from them." 

The Daily Illini has long been infamous 
for creating campus controversy through 
its coverage and on its editorial pages. With 
a staff of 17 editors and more than 150 
students working as reporters, columnists, 
photographers, designers and graphic art- 
ists, the DI is a paper produced by students, 
for students and about students. 

Sunday through Thursday, students come 
together in the building at 57 E. Green St. 
Work occurs from 8 a.m. when day produc- 
tion begins its work on the advertisements 
that go into each day's paper, to early after- 
noon when reporters and editors come in to 



fvtiA pn tAe 
jpfi training 



begin working on stories, to late night when 
student copy editors, designers and paginators 
produce the paper for the next day. 

In many instances the DI functions like a 
professional newspaper. Supported entirely 
by local advertising, the paper is independent 
from the university and is staffed almost en- 
tirely by students. Students decide the paper's 
stance on many issues during editorial board 
meetings each Sunday. News judgment and 
placements are made during a news confer- 
ence held late each 
day. 

Many student edi- 
tors and reporters de- 
vote more than 40 
hours a week to the 
DI and carry full 
classloads. How- 
ever, most of the 
staff members find 
it worthwhile. 

"The DI gives any- 
one the opportunity to 
see the inner- workings of a truly professional 
newspaper," said Features Editor Michael 
Dizon. Dizon, senior in CBA, has worked at 
the DI during his entire four years in college. 
"It's more than just coming in everyday 
and writing. It's a learning experience," he 
said. "For non-journalism majors like myself, 
almost everything I know about editing or 
reporting I learned from people on the staff." 
Mike Cetera, DI higher education reporter, 
said the main benefit of working at the DI is 
experience. "I'm not going to gain experience 
by sitting in a three-hour journalism lab learn- 
ing how to use WordPerfect," said Cetera, 
sophomore in LAS. 

As we head into our 125th year represent- 
ing independent student media at the U of I, 
the DI continues to work toward providing a 
learning environment for students interested 
in media fields, while also providing the cam- 
pus community with necessary information 
about local, national and international events. 
— Story by Elaine Richardson 



ntzations 



/* ditor-in-chief Elaine Richardson dis- 
(£/ cusses issues that concern the Daily 
llini with some other members of the staff, 
very day a news conference is held to decide 
ie placement and content of the news. 




-Rick Widmer 



J ate on a weekday night, Scott Sherrin 
JLj types in a story that must be completed 
ir the next day's edition. Sherrin not only 
wrks for the Daily Illini, but he is also the 
ssistant to the Publisher for the Illini 
tedia Company. 



/* rnie Perez, one of the Graphics Editors 

(£/ for the Daily Illini, traces a graphic that 

will be included in the paper. The Daily 

Illini is one of the nation's top-ranked 

daily neivspapers. 



Daily Illini 331 



i 




in! Jwdo Te-am 



J The Illini Judo Team was 
founded in 1989. 

J The team is comprised of 
more than 30 members with 
five black belts. 

X Many team members have 
competed and placed in re- 
gional tournaments. 

| Some members have also 
done well at the collegiate and 
national levels. 

X The team not only trains at 
IMPE, but also can be found 
partying at local bars. 




Illini Judo Team: First Row: GintaZvilius, Torrey Williams, Luci la Espedido, TimKang, Rico Bova, Jason Metcalfe. Second Row: John Voris, Kevin Narimatsu, Kevin Pettit, Franklin 
Baex, Mission Freedom. Third Row: Chris Sears, Ellard Roush, Mike Foley, Andy Hall, Terry Szudarski. Not Pictured: Stefan Volker, Rodney Wheat, Allan Saxor, Wes Payton. 




Prld 



C- 



J Illini Pride is the larg- 
est student organization 
on campus. 

X They support all Illini ath- 
letics by decorating locker 
rooms, passing out fliers and 
showing our Illini Pride. 

X Illini Pride organizes the 
Orange Crush Basketball 
Cheering Section. 

X They support the Fighting 
Illini by organizing road trips 
at several Big Ten games. 

| They are a leading organi- 
zation in preparing Illini 
homecoming. 




332 Organizations 



Illini Pride: First Row: Matt Goben, Brian Lehn, Donna Rolf, Zach Belton, Briant Kelly, Bart Bittner. Second Row: Theresa Boian, Laurie Launer, Tom Conklin, Aaron Perkmson 
Jan Croegart, Jennifer Esworthv, Amanda Hilton, Rebecca Potts. 




Union FJoard 

X The Illini Union Board pro- 
vides programs and services to 
students, faculty, staff, alumni 
and guests of the university. 

X There are ten programming 
areas, each coordinated by Illini 
Union Board student members, 
who plan educational, cultural 
and social activities for the cam- 
pus community. 

X Some of the Illini Union 
Board programs include the Fall 
and Spring Musicals, African- 
American Homecoming, Block 
I, I-Book, Mom's Day Fashion 
Show and the International Fes- 
tival. In addition, the Illini Union 
Board sponsors large lectures, 
comedians and concerts for 
weekend entertainment. 

X The Illini Union board also 
advises the Director of the Illini 

niUnionBoard: FirstRow:RajeshriPateLTriffanieJones,JenniferCuasay,PeggieBurnett.Second Row:CathyAbbott,HankWalter,LaNelleOwens,ErinBaker,JenniferPflueger, Union Oil building policies 
sa Dunbar, Traci Dant, Michelle Taylor. Third Row: Renaldo Dixon, Jorge Leon, Ed Slazinik, Clyde Mize, Robert Mindrum, Gustav Goger, Dan Stoffel, John Benberg, Jason Hoyt, i , ■ 

innon Tebbin, Suzanne Beauvoir. ana Operations. 




S/arSrty 

\Aon'<; CAoo CA\ib 




X The Varsity Men's Glee Club 
is open to all male university 
students who care to audition 
and love to sing. 

% They sing all types of music 
from spiritual to university 
fight songs. 

\ For large shows at Krannert, 
they often sing along with the 
Women's Glee Club. 

X The Varsity Men's Glee Club 
goes around to high schools in 
Illinois and is used as an im- 
portant recruiting tool. 

X They have a lot of fun. 



rsity Men's Glee Club: First Row: Andrew Goldberg, David Wilner, Brad Haag, David Wagner, Christo- 
;r Kreps. Second Row: Damon Ascolani, Michael Foncannon, Jonathan Sperry, Stanley Gee, Jonathan 
olin, Kevin Wiland. Third Row: Mack Tice, Pete Carus, Adam Wengert, Timothy Fraser, Joel Coffey, Tom 
nklin. Fourth Row: Robert Abrams, Eric Saarnio, Kendrick Jackoks, James Hancock, Darren Jacksoon, Shane 
ton. Fifth Row: Barry Cohen, John Campbell, Tyler Stevens, Karl Nelson, Nathan Brammeier, Jason Uner. 
th Row: Bryan Segebart, Brund Calgaro, Ryan Behling, Gregory Thorne, Michael Giuis, Dawson Weber, 
enth Row: Christopher Miller, Michael Lee, Justin Strackany, Joel Stevenson, David Reeder, Stefan Driesner. 
hth Row: Timothy Bonesteel, Eric Croft. 



Organizations 333 




I Epsilon Delta promotes an 
awareness of current educa- 
tional issues to all students who 
have an interest in education. 

X They provide information 
about the teaching profession 
and an opportunity to become 
involved in the educational 
community. 

$ Epsilon Delta promotes a 
sense of community within the 
teacher education curricula at 
the University of Illinois. 

X They sponsor philanthropic 
activities which serve the chil- 
dren of the local community. 

X Epsilon Delta is an expand- 
ing organization open to all 
students at the University of 

Illinois wlin rlTP intprP'^tprl in Epsilon Delta Professional Education Organization: FirstRow: Alison Bullerman, Christine Warp, Karin Oldfield, Jackie Meyers, Shoshana Goldman. 

Second Row: Angela Mitter, Sally Gschendtner, Becky Kresin, Sharon Drews, Mindy Schultz, Kiersten Crafton, Nicole Lisk. Not Pictured: Kelly Hunt, 
the field Of education. Serra Koss, Kristin Zage. 




334 Organizations 



S+3K C<o\)rc>Cs 




tar Course Managers: First Row: James Paz, Andy Scroggins, Eric Boeing, Phil Stepping. Second Row: Amber Barr, Jeff Blouin, Tania Pachof. Third Row: Katie 
^allaert, Emily Olsen. Fourth Row 7 : Violet Makowski. 



% Star Course is a completely 
student-run concert organi- 
zation that brings rock bands 
to campus. 

\ It is made up of approxi- 
mately 90 student staff mem- 
bers and is headed by a group 
of nine junior managers and 
two senior managers. 

X First semester, Star Course 
rocked U of I with such shows 
as Tori Amos, Toad the Wet 
Sprocket and Live. Also, the 
power play Oleanna was pre- 
sented. 

X 1994 marks the 1 year an- 
niversary for Band Jam, an 
all-day concert put together 
by Star Course featuring lo- 
cal bands and acoustic acts. 

X Star Course is really fun. 




'tar Course: First Row: Amy Russell, Naomi Boehm, Dave Yu, Eric Boeing, Nicci Webster, Lisa Kay, Alison Talbert, Christine Gilbert, Emily Olsen, Deisy Davila, Amelia Dunn, 
Martha Juaniza, Brett Rumminger, Katie Wallaert, Deb Levy, Ellen Brown, Karen Durante. Second Row: Sarah Hart Stephanie Katsaros, Carrie Crawford, Gina Perino, Jami Cali, 
:rin Naughton, Jeff Blouin, Tania Fachof, Amber Barr, Violet Makowski, John Major, Jen Spire, Brian Quigley, Pat McEvoy, Tiffany Vitek, Miles Rosenburg, Ryan Aubin. Third 
low: Phil Stepping, Ben Bischmann, Paul Fuller, Dan Gazdic, Susan Niemeyer, Jamie Curulewshi, Kevin Brumund, Vilija Grazulis, Liz Burnett, Band-Aid Bryant, Robin Harris, 
,ina Modestas, Paul Moyano, Barb O'Brien, Lisa Alberts, Sherie Yearton, Melissa Angio, Jon Nail. Fourth Row: Elizabeth Elmore, Kristie Rachell, Gladys Montemayor, Mike 
Jeckermann, Vadim Dadiomov, Rana Mishra, Joaquin McCoy Marty Casey, James Paz, Andy Scroggins, Lisa Sutti, Gabe Hernandex, Laura Gibb, Kelly Beckett, JulieCirrincione, 
Mane Babski, Stacza Lipinski, Bart Zuber. 



Organizations 335 






if 



The- k$vo 



£ The Issue magazine is new 
to the University of Illinois 
campus. Its premier issue was 
available on Jan. 10, 1995. 

$ The Issue tries to give stu- 
dents at the University of 
Illinois information on top- 
ics that they may come in 
contact with while spend- 
ing their time at college. 

X The Issue also has a sec- 
tion devoted to student 
work. It strives to enlighten 
students to the work and 
experiences of their peers. 

X Once a month, The Issue 
comes out with a discussion 
on a new topic. The first Is- 
sue discussed relationships 
on campus. 

| The Issue magazine is an 
independent student publi- 
cation of the Illini Media 
Company. 




Art Director Ingrid Schnable, Graphic Designer Cathy Nieciecki and Reporter Kathleen Thomas discuss the magazine's content at a banquet held for The Issue in the Illini Union. 




Urbana Alderman James H. Hayes, Jr. talks with The Issue Editor-in-Chief Rob Nesvacil and Writer Kelly McEvers. 



56 Organizations 




he Issue Editorial Board: First Row: Rebecca Kanik, Jennifer Jorgenson, Jennifer Stern, Gabriel Rosenberg. Second Row: Robert J. Nesvacil, Carol Messing, Luke Albrecht, Ingrid Schnable, Cathy Nieciecki. Not Pictured: Jacquerae 
arber (Business Manager) 




U^UpMthi-rn '~l'; u:dst>n i*te( 



X ).';>:< iJrirwiWi oi li),« 



march 1995 volume! J*u*3 



The March edition of The Issue featured articles about different aspects 
of life in Champaign-Urbana such as alumni in Champaign, life east 
of Wright Street and guarding against crime. The Issue, which pre- 
miered in January of 1995, addresses topics that affect U of I students. 




Organizations 337 



L-AS Co\jv\c^\ 



X Each year LAS Council se- 
lects two departmental advisers 
for their excellent work. This 
particular committee of the 
Council is responsible for gath- 
ering student input and recom- 
mending recipients for the LAS 
College awards to the LAS 
Awards Committee. 

% Using the Council's best re- 
source, the students, this com- 
mittee helps with peer advising 
during the week of advising, the 
week of advance enrollment and 
at on-campus registration. 

X In addition to responsibility 
for publicizing the Council 
activities, this committee is 
also responsible for the Coun- 
cil Newsletter. 

X This group is responsible for 
fundraising and for special 
projects for the Council. 




LAS Council: First Row: josh Nathan, Jennifer Kelly- Barb Andersen, Heather Wright, Susan Eads. Second Row: Amy Petry, Mick Cox, Michelle Swanson, Andy Akan, 
Kerri Schultz, Jennifer Pfluger. Third Row: Chris Gange, Dean Sylvia Riley, London Summerville, Mike Chen, CassieCreswell, Barb Peckham, Emma MacLaren, Vlad 
Palma, Gordon Buchanan. 



Industrial Pfefribi/fion 



X Every student major in in In- 
dustrial Distribution Manage- 
ment belongs to the Industrial 
Distribution Student Association. 

X IDSA rounds out the Business 
Administration curriculum with 
speakers, field trips, resume 
books and social "outings." 

X Recent field trips included 
Tom Zosel Associates, a distribu- 
tion consulting firm, UPS, Eagle 
Wings, Morton Metal Craft and 
Caterpillar. 

X Over 140 companies come to 
campus to interview Industrial 
Distribution Management stu- 
dents, upholding the 100% job 
placement rate for some of the 
most sought after graduating se- 
niors on campus. 




338 Organizations 



Ma Wan Pa 




X Ma Wan Da is a Senior Activi- 
ties Honor Society that recognizes 
students who have given their 
time, service and, most of all, their 
dedication and leadership to con- 
tribute to the continued excellence 
of the U of I. 

X It is the U of I's oldest Senior 
Honorary and was founded in 
1913 when two competing orga- 
nizations merged. 

X Members of Ma Wan Da are 
recognized at graduation by the 
white cords on their gowns. 

X Requirements for application 
include junior standing, demon- 
stration of service to the Univer- 
sity and the surrounding com- 
munity, scholastic achievement 
and outstanding leadership. 

Ma WanDa: FirstRow: Jennifer Wozniak,ElizabethBaer,SameetaSheth,AlmaLutgu,InnaFialko,MarieTamondong,Linsey Brown. Second Row: Megan Feeney, Laurie Sagan, + TVn<i Vear's claSS Organized a 

Kellv Harvey, Nicole Lisk, Jeanne Reiter, Julie Smull, Sarah DeMeyer, Jennifer Lung. Third Row: Jonathan Dunn, Christine Baddick, Amy Hurliman, Christopher Kuster, Brian ' _ -^ & 

Vogel, Jennifer Carlson, Jeevan Subbiah, Melissa Worden, Christopher Kodosky, Rebecca Hollis, Jennifer Crump, Michael Anichini. Fourth Row: Denise Kaplan, Amy Russell, fundraiser tO help raise money 

NateMiller,SarahSchilling,EmmaMacLaren,DarrenHavens,JasonPeragine.NotPictured: Barbara Andersen, MargaretCurvey, David Eldridge, Diane Heidorn,Briant Kelly, f tVi G ' (~'^ f~"ff f A 

Jody McCormick, Elizabeth Moulds, Maurie Richie, Staci Stuedle. Advisor: Rhonda Kirts. r ° r tfie senior ^laSS VjllX. TUnCl. 



Mortar Board 



X Mortar Board is a co-ed na- 
tional senior honor society 
founded in 1918 that has 204 
chapters with 1 70,000 members. 

% Selection is based on excel- 
lence in academics, leadership 
and service. 

% The original chapter was an 
all women's honor society 
founded in 1900 called Phi 
Delta Psi. 

X History states that in early 
years, the identity of the women 
was kept in strict secrecy. 

X An old tradition in Mortar 
Board is an initiation process 
called "tapping in" in which the 
old members capture the new 
members who are then made to 

Mortar Board: First Row: Cathy Blythe, Helen Bredenburg, Jill Brown, Don Brust, Sarah Camper, Jennifer Carmichael, Vivian Chow, Joella Foster, Evangeline pertOrm a University SOng Or 
Galvez. Second Row: Jennifer Georgas, Eric Hiller, Mike Hoffman, Anne Kendeigh, Aveen MacEntee, Christina Mantis, Sandy Mitofsky, Meg Obenauf, Marie SOme Other tVPe of aCtivitV. 
O'Conner. Third Row: Elaine Oh, Cassie Phillips, Howard Rosenberg, Jennifer Scherer, Gayle Silagye, Cynthia Tenhouse, Jim Underwood, David Walter, Ruthie 
Wyman. Not Pictured: Gretchen Jokish. 




Organizations 339 



Phi 



| They have one of the larg- 
est, most active chapters in 
the nation. 

X One of their big goals is to 
give members an idea of what 
the business world is really like. 

$ Phi Gamma Nu is one of 
the most recognized and re- 
spected organizations in the 
College of Commerce and 
Business Administration. 

J They are the most diverse 
academic fraternity on cam- 
pus by supplementing their 
professional and social activi- 
ties with various philan- 
thropic events. 

$ Phi Gamma Nu recruits 
only the finest university stu- 
dents who wish to become 
participants, not just mem- 
bers, in our organization. 




Phi Gamma Nu: First Row: Christie Mathieson, Kelly McNeela, Anil Mansukhani, Stephanie Kalivas, Joe DeMarco, Bonny Garcha, Marjorie Larican, Amy Reider, Frank Cobo, Ami 
Shah, Phuong Duong, Lorena Kurtjian. Second Row: Charlton Woods, Lisa Konrath, Payal Gurnani, Geoff Ellis, Anna Tsimlik, Dave Malinger, Klaudia Ducek, Mark Killian, Julianne 
Shader, Mike Nicholus, Angela Farmer, Brad Feldman, Jenifer Engelhardt, Bryce Fuller, Ami Patel, Tracy Granata, Monica Malkanil, Jon Marotta, Nate Brochmann, Christy Gross, 
Steve Ciszewski. Third Row: Amy Gabriel, Peter Koob, Maria Berger, Jerrimy Nacke, Jennifer Sutor, Kim Somerville, Matt Griswold, Todd Knudsen, Trey Gehrt, Joel Stopka, Brian 
Benes, Jason Wyckoff, Scott Miller, Tim Vieth, Andy Grieve, Julie Winkleman. Fourth Row: Lisa Konrath, Mandv Mayers, Stephanie Holland, Erica Tebo, Elizabeth Bennett, Kim ! 
Stanley, Shannon Sheils, Tori Nicolle, Lori Koenig, Michelle Shames, Lyn Debatin, Jennifer Klein, Ann Persico, Daisie Yu, Tracv Furmanski, Patty Divane, Gabrielle Loomis, Jodi < 
Schaffner, Heidi Ehernhofer, Kyle Nixon, Kalpesh Shah, Mr. Patrick Cleary. Fifth Row: Margie Osterkamp, Julie Smith, Kim Grownev, Colleen Metzger, Melissa Worman, Nicole 
Aardema, Heidi Ferrer, Maria Baksay, Julie Murphy, Kris Wayer, Gail Losieczka, Andrea Bruch, Kathy Naggs, Erin Griffin, Elizabeth Burke. 



Fh\ 



Tau 



Skm 



^ Pi Tau Sigma is the National 
Honorary Mechanical Engi- 
neering Fraternity, and was 
founded at the University of 
Illinois in 1915. 

£ Their purpose is to promote 
the professional welfare of 
members by encouraging and 
stimulating academic achieve- 
ment and by providing an op- 
portunity to develop interper- 
sonal and leadership skills 
through activities. 

| Every semester they spon- 
sor philanthropic activities, 
meetings with facutly speak- 
ers, a hot dog cookout, advance 
enrollment peer advising, so- 
cial hours and sporting events 
against other societies. 



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iruzations 



Pi Tau Sigma: First Row: Eric Skowron, Julie Mauri tzson, Francesca Ruffolo, David Shereyk. Second Row: Mike Shelby, Edward Emaci, Jae Lim. Scott Duncan, Brian Shau feld 
Kevin Stone. 




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Pre-Law Club: First Row: Elizabeth S. Hickey, Sonia A. Desai. Second Row: Heather Henning, Michelle L. Duf field, Amy L. Geherna. Third 
Row: Aalok Virmani, Matthew O. Brady, Jennifer L. Hodel. 

Frothy Wo\}C,o 




\ Benefits of Pre-Law Club 
membership include the infor- 
mation filled Gavel, the Pre- 
Law Club's newsletter, which 
features articles about club ac- 
tivities, law school information 
and news about current issues 
in the legal profession. 

% They hold monthly meet- 
ings with speakers from differ- 
ent areas of the legal profes- 
sion and related fields. 

\ They also hold the Mock 
LSAT, a practice in taking the 
exam under conditions similar 
to the real test. 

X Pre-Law Club provides 
qualification for membership 
in Phi Alpha Delta, the Pre- 
Law Honorary. 

X The Pre-Law Club holds so- 
cial activities and much more! 



Presby House: First Row: Angie Baranzelli, Chrystal Hall, Lana Chambers, Anne Kohlhagen, Beth Orr, Sara Paschke, Velda Freehill. Second 
Row: Jenelle Johnson, Jill Stoller, Dawn Strunk, Sasha Thompson. Third Row: Shani File, Julie Milner, Angie Harms, Sara Schoener, Rachael 
Wamsley. Fourth Row: Tammy Hiler, Christy Jones, Michelle Dewa, Laura Stranski, Heather Denton. Fifth Row: Amy Doll, Dana Ranhen, 
Dawn Wunderlee. Sixth Row: Kristi Delheimer, Lanee Webel, Shawn Hembrogh, Colleen Strunk, Kate Lemon, Jodi Goebel. Seventh Row: 
Gwendolyn Geistler, Lisa Gillett, Connie Chamberlyn, Melissa Sjoblom, Heidi Dalton, Niki Flowers, Amanda Folk. 



X Presby House provides cer- 
tified housing for 40 women at 
the University of Illinois, and it 
is located at Fourth and John 
Streets, near the Quad and the 
campus night life. 

X Diverse majors and person- 
alities make Presby House not 
just a house but our home. 

X The House Mom was Assis- 
tant Program Director at IUSA, 
working with campus activi- 
ties, the Illinettes and with the 
First Year Impact Program 
for freshmen. 

X The members are actively 
involved in intermural sports, 
campus clubs, community ser- 
vice organizations and also hold 
exchanges, a formal and a 
barndance throughout the year. 



Organizations 341 



X The American Society 
of Civil Engineers' main 
purpose is to promote the 
Civil Engineering profes- 
sion to students. 

J ASCE programs pro- 
mote interaction between 
students and faculty. 

X The American Society 
of Civil Engineers spon- 
sors community service 
programs that provide 
such things as wheelchair 
ramps for the handi- 
capped and elderly. 

J ASCE brings in guest 
speakers from the civil 
engineering profession to 
speak about different 
projects that are currently 
underway or in the plan- 
ning process. 

X A professional Issues 
Seminar gave students the 
chance to see problems 
facing civil engineers to- 



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day 



, . . t ( American Society of Civil Engineers: First Row: Michael Hall, Casey Wagner, Cecilia Chang, Jen Senneff, Julie Villanueva, Carolyn McGee, Lou Gale. Second Row: Faculty Advisor Mike. 

cHlQ in tile rUrUTC. Darter, Jerry King, Ben Ernst, Jamie Christian, York Moehlenkamp, Mike Larson, Pat O'Brien, Alan Blonz, Jason Frank, Bryan Luke, Aaron Reilly, Faculty Advisor Susan Larson. 




;aruzations 



H"afl k<&ocAvWov[ 




RHA Committee Chairpersons: First Row; James King, Perek Persico, Matthew O'Brady, Jose Ruiz, Jeremy Wieck, Justine Hotard, Eric Reffert, Amit Goel. Second Row: 
Adam DuMoulin, Diane Stevenson, Jill Riedl, Terry Lawrence, Julie Sitz, Sonya Perez, Dan Trevino, Eva Dervin. 




RHA General Assembly: First Row: Saptarshe Bandyopadhyay, James King, Dan Kwaitkawski, Bharat Patel, Stephen Jacob, Diane Stevenson, Krystal Atkins, Darweed 
Lawson. Second Row: Ron Malik, Sonya Rayford, Syreeta Hughes, Jay Stevenson, Khushali Parikh, Matt Thomas, Natochewa Findley, Tenaya Turner, Felicia Griffin, 
Sylvester Fulcher. Third Row: Nikki Young, Brandy Johnson, Abbie Finlayson, Carey Checca, Weston Proxy, Suzanne Vass, Craig Finch, Jason Beatty, Julie Swinehart, Percy 
Walters. Fourth Row: David Hjelmgren, Lenal Weichel, Trevelyn Florence, Terry Lawrence, Jessica Ray, Anne Geraci, Dave Moraski, Nicola Vaughan. 

RHA Executive Board: Kimberly 
Egonmwan, Y'vonne Albert, 
Ryan Majeres, Christopher 
Murin, Kristen Pierce, Kim 
Kolman. 




% The UIUC Residence 
Hall Association repre- 
sents all students living 
in the University Resi- 
dence Halls. Each resi- 
dent is an automatic 
member of RHA. With 
its 8,000 members, RHA 
is one of the largest Reg- 
istered Student Organi- 
zations on Campus. 

\ RHA's assembly con- 
sists of an Executive 
Board, Committee Chair- 
persons and representa- 
tives and presidents from 
each hall council and Black 
Student Union. 

X RHA sponsors and 
plans programs that ben- 
efit residents. Program- 
ming is instituted through 
the nine RHA committees 
as well as the hall councils 
and BlackStudent Unions. 

X RHA has continued to 
develop and recruit lead- 
ers through various con- 
ferences. Among these are 
the RHA/CBSU Allerton 
Conference, the New 
Leader Conference and 
the RHA/ CBSU Spring 
Conference. RHA is rep- 
resented at state, regional 
and national conferences. 

X The RHA Assembly 
has dealt with various is- 
sues involving policy in 
the residence halls and 
with administration. This 
year RHA has dealt with a 
resolution concerning the 
residence hall room and 
board rate increase, a reso- 
lution concerning the 24 
hour quiet hour policy in 
the University Residence 
Halls during finals week 
and many others. 



Organizations 343 






SAMS 



J Students Against Mul- 
tiple Sclerosis (SAMS) is a 
national student movement 
created to involve students 
in the fight against a disease 
which commonly affects 
their own age group. The 
purpose of SAMS is to 
increase the public's aware- 
ness of MS and to edu- 
cate college students about 
the disease. 

X Our fundraising includes 
an annual tricycle race dur- 
ing homecoming and Trash- 
a-Frat Rat in the spring. 

^ We work closely with 
those afflicted with the dis- 
ease through the local MS 
support group. MS is a 
chronic and disabling neu- 
rological disease affecting 
over 250,000 people in the 
U.S. alone. 




Students Against Multiple Sclerosis Executive Board: First Row: Marti Terrell, Jennifer Cloney, Colleen McDonaugh, Gladys 
Montemayor. Second Row: Steve Smith, Becky Kresin, Amanda Donnelly, Kristin Duttsman, Brittini Raymond. 



Skwa Alpha lata 



I Sigma Alpha Iota is a pro- 
fessional music service fra- 
ternity determined to en- 
hance the musical aspects 
of this university and 
its community. 

$ This group is compiled 
of a variety of majors binded 
by the love of music. 

X Sigma Alpha Iota will 
always remember: cha- 
rades, self-defense class, 
bake sales, M.I. fundrais- 
ers, musicals, formal and 
much more. 

X We will never forget all 
our memories with our 
alumni, and we thank each 
and every member for 
her faithful contribution to 
our sisterhood. 




izations 



Sigma Alpha Iota: First Row: Erin Evenson, Kristen Molnar, Monique Hsu, Lara Salver, Mary Braun, Heather Simon, Joan Mocek. Second Row Alison 
Paige Begor, Nicole Ratschan, Jacquie James, Jenna Deysher, Kathleen Bruzek, Ember Sladek, Amy Vogt, Kimberly Keniley. Jennifer Wilkie \ot 
Pictured: Julie Barrett, Lelah Beasley, Elizabeth Casey, Laura Dobecki, Melody Guadalupe, Vicki Moore, Claire Salomon, and Kelley Squires. 



Stiidonti 

0\oVo\ r Y[moY& Association 




J The Student Government 
Association strives to meet 
particular student needs by 
providing students with the 
possibilities to recommend 
and express their opinions. 

$ SGA provides services to 
the students by promoting 
involvement with the Uni- 
versity through its wide va- 
riety of campus committees. 

£ Student concerns such as 
tuition increases, campus 
safety and SORF funding are 
tackled head on by SGA. 

$ SGA is also directly in- 
volved with producing and 
distributing the "Outlook" 
which informs students on 
course selections. 



Student Government Association: First Row: Rosette Cordero (Membership Coordinator), Jason Klein (Parliamentarian), David Zissman (Treasurer), Julie Riccardi (Executive Vice- 
President), William Shibla (President), Shannon Tebben (Clerk), Paul Spilotro. Second Row: Ben Halperin (Academic Vice-President), Andrea Anderson, Jeff Kaminsky, Ryan Majeres, 
Howard Rosenberg, Dorothy Moe, Julie Wheat, Danielle Madise, Melissa Webber, Henry Alitto, Curtis Regulus, Brandon Beavers, Henoc Erke, Sharon Yates. Third Row: Brad Dupont, 
Mike Barrett, Steve Gradham, Todd Plotner, Doug Wojcirszak, Adedeji Akinkunle, Tony Rodrigues. 



SocJ\oti\ oj- 

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Society of Women Engineers: First Row: Rosanna Leung, Jill Tucker, Debby Shepard (President), Sarah Dolezal, Kristin Eder. Second Row: Sima 
Desai, Rachel Jansses, Pavan Kochar, Thea Colwell, Joetta Bohman, Erin Baker, Shula Patel, Cheryl Mock. Not Pictured: Deborah Worthineton, Tracy 
Victorine, Tanya Moschetti, Carolyn Devolder, Cyndi Czop, Anju Jaggi, Dana Marcotte, Marybeth Kauss. 



J The Society of Women 
Engineers received the T.I.S. 
Outstanding Campus Orga- 
nization Award. 

$ The chapter grew in size 
to over 300 members and in 
activeness with over 50 pro- 
grams and 10 committees. 

J UI Team Tech and inter- 
disciplinary engineering 
project with industry went 
to the national competi- 
tion level. 

J SWE Sensations, our in- 
tramural softball team, won 
the championship for the 
second year in a row. 

X Another first for UI-SWE 
was the joint car workshop 
program with SAE, an out- 
standing success. 



Organizations 345 



S+vdc-Kit A"iv»ta^adoK 



X "Team Up With Tepper" - promotional pro- 
gram highlighting Coach Lou Tepper and the 
Fighting Mini Football Team. 

J Mini Community Connection - program that 
sends U of I faculty /staff representives to service 
club meetings promoting the university. 

J Mini Days - program in conjuction with the 
Office of Admissions and Records targeted at vis- 
iting high school juniors and seniors interested in 
attending the University of Illinois. 

J Student Ambassadors serve as official student 
representatives at University functions. For ex- 
ample, they have been representatives for Foun- 
dation Weekend, Reunions, President's Recep- 
tions, etc. 

X Ambassador selection takes place at the begin- 
ning of each Spring semester and consists of an 
application and interview process. The Student 
Ambassador office is located at 227 Mini Union. 




Student Ambassadors: First Row: President, Jill Brown; Vice-President Membership, Anne Kendeigh. Second Row: Advisor, Judy Babb; Vice 
President External, Christine Baddick. 




Student Ambassadors: First Row: Anne Kendeigh, Margaret Curvey, Cassie Phillips, Lynn Brown, Karen Werstein, Kristin Maslowski. Second Row: Rachel Schilling, Kristina Lindgren, Melanie Tomczak, Shelly Zumwalt, Natalie Carter, 
Jen Cox, Gretchen Jokisch, Briant Kelly, Jill Brown. Third Row: Badia Ahad, Matt Helms, Sherie Yearton, Kathleen Reeves, J'ne Kinney, Jim Underwood, Jackie Jones, Micheal Anichini, Annika VanGelder, Christine Baddick. Fourth Row: 
Chris Welch, Jeff Bobis, Aaron Wilken, Dave Walter. 



'%& Organizations 



The- Ofhor Oim<> — 

X The group has been an a cappella tradition since 1969. 

% It consists of eight men who arrange their own music, choreograph their own performances and do all of their own stunts. 

X The Other Guys have travelled throughout the United States and Europe, serving as ambassadors for the University of Illinois. 

X The group's performances are a fascinating combination of high quality singing and lighthearted comedy. 

X They are "preferred three to one over the leading brand." 



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The Other Guys: Brad Haag, Scott Cison, Michael Gillis, Ryan Behling, Andrew Louis Goldberg 111, Adam Wengert, Justin Strackany, David Reeder. 



Organizations 347 



nitM<% tkd whoU "^tftnet 



// 



"All the 

experience 

will help 

later in life 

for my 

career. " 

—Beth 



Porter 



Time Warp Tuesdays at CO. Daniel's in Champaign - the Don Moyer Boys and 

has been a well-known aspect of WPGU Girls Club. 
"The Planet's" involvement with the com- "The Planet co-sponsored Operation 

munity. Behind the scenes, The Planet Santa Claus with them. Local businesses 

was much more than Time Warp and ra- donated toys to be used as presents for 

dio broadcasting. the children," said Jethandelyn Morales, 

Throughout the community, the Planet Marketing and Promotions director for 

became one of the leading radio stations WPGU. "Also, we held a duck race annu- 

in terms of getting involved with local ally with Don Moyer Boys and Girls 

businesses. "We do a lot of on location Club," added Morales, senior in ALS. 
broadcasting with local businesses," said With everything that the Planet was 



Maria Gaziano, di- 
rector of external 
promotions. "We 
did one with R & R's 
Sports Grill to help 
advertise the bar," 
added Gaziano, jun- 
ior in LAS. These on- 
air broadcasting 
helped to draw 
in customers be- 
cause of giveaways 



7^ ^pfanet 

redtAes put U 
tAe tPfutuHrilty 



doing for the com- 
munity, one won- 
dered how being in- 
volved with it af- 
fected the atmo- 
sphere within the 
radio station. 

"The people are 
fun to be with. All 
the experience will 
help later in life for 
my career," said 
Beth Porter, fresh- 



and contests. 

Not only did interaction between local man in LAS. 
businesses and the Planet occur, but the The Planet not only brought entertain- 

Planet also helped perform in commu- ing music to the ears of university and 

nity service. With events ranging from community patrons, but it also proved, 

Gus Macker - a basketball tournament- to that the employees cared about the events^ 

Plane Funday, where Williard Airport occurring in the community around them 

with Lifeline Pilots hosted an airplane was involved in. Staff went out of their 

show. But it seemed that the Planet was way to "Unite the Whole Planet." 
heavily involved with one specific club — Story by Jennifer Williams 



ionizations 





en Ponzio, sophomore in LAS and sales 
manager for WPGU, and Gelene Mo- 
rales, senior in LAS and marketing promo- 
tions director, review paperwork at a desk in 
the WPGU offices in the basement of Weston 
Hall. The Planet moved to an office on Green 
Street in early March. 

si ean Smyth, senior in LAS and a disc 

(^} jockey for Die Planet, talks on the 

phone. In the past year, Tlie Planet has held 

countless on-location broadcasts to promote 

local businesses both on and off campus. 



-Dave Wolkowitz 



The Planet 349 






X The Student Alumni Association 
is a student-run organization that 
creates programming for the entire 
student body. 

j: Some of SAA's programs include 
Sibling's Day, Be a Part From the 
Start, Senior Reception, Illini Come- 
back, Relay for Life and the nation's 
oldest and largest Homecoming. 

$ Student Alumni Association mem- 
bers are some of the most motivated 
and active leaders on the University 
of Illinois campus. 

X If you are interested in joining SAA 
be sure to stop by room 227 of the 
Illini Union to pick up an application 
in January. 

I Student Alumni Association is 
sponsored by the University of Illi- 
nois Alumni Association. 




Student Alumni Association Members: First Row: Amy Amato, Sarah Beckman, Brandon Hurlbut, Cathy Blvthe, Marie Tamondong, Elizabeth Moulds fodj 
McCormick. Second Row: Heather Parmalee, Don Brust, Jim Underwood, Jason Peragine, Dan ABorstein, Jennifer Flynn, Lynn Brown, Matt Jewel. Third Row: Donna 
Rolf, Anne Kidd, Jennifer Dunbar, Brian Basch, Laura Zerbe, Jennifer Crump, Dave Krug, Jennifer Sherlock, Tony Perkins, John Tuntland, Scott McClung, Matt Goben. 
Fourth Row: Cliff Peterson, Christie Walshoff, Elaine Oh, Kelli Lynch, Cathy Jung, Sara Ulbrich, Christie Mathiesonm, Jodi Kawada, Craig Sims, Doninic Susin. 




350 Organizations 



Student Alumni Association Executive Board: First Row: Judith M. Babb, Donald J 
Peragine, James M. Underwood, Jennifer E. Flvnn, Daniel B. Borstein. 



Brust. Second Row: Jason M. 



The- 6?i irk 
Ne-xf Poor 




| The Girls Next Door is the Univer- 
sity of Illinois' oldest women's 
a cappella octet. 

J 1994 marked the year of the First 
Annual Holiday A Cappella Concert 
hosted by both The Girls Next Door 
and the Other Guys. 



ie Girls Next Door: First Row: Nicole Tempia, Tracy Genczo, Joanna Howard, Jennifer Sikich, Bridget O'Neill. Second Row: 
yce Lee, Julie Larsen. Third Row: Karen Bennert. 



\Nomov\<> 




% Women's Glee Club celebrated its 
100th anniversary at its annual Mom's 
Day Concert in April. 

X In addition to performing selections 
from a wide repertoire, Women's Glee 
Club commissioned a special piece by 
choral composer Nancy Telfer in com- 
memoration of its anniversary. 

\ Other Women's Glee Club perfor- 
mances throughout the year included 
Dad's Day with the Varsity Men's Glee 
Club, the annual fall concert and a holi- 
day carol concert with the other under- 
graduate choral ensembles. 



'omen's Glee Club: Front Row: Laura Moglia, Karen Bennett, Lisa Guerra, Jennifer Isenberg, Anne 
endeigh, Jodi McKeown, Antara Nath, Monique Hsu, Julia Davis, Lynn Deobler, Beth Watkins. Second Row: 
alit Bryl, Julie Reinish, Sarah Langley, Mindy Maves, Tracy Genczo, Chan Lim, Meryl Ibis, Betsy Maville, 
lura Zurawski, Deepa Rajkarne. Third Row: Felicia Filip, Heather Aeschleman, Jacquie James, Emma 
acLaren, Kelly Donahue, Janet Flewelling, Erin Grant, Karen Petroskey, Melissa Peterson. Fourth Row: 
irah Beckman, Jennifer Sikich, Amanda Braid, Julie Poss, Director Dr. Joe Grant. Fifth Row: Julia Warner, 
itricia Hamil, Alice Heaton, liana Lubitsch, Niole Tempia, Sara Marx. Joycelynn Trask, Alissa Konnekker, 
iura Chambers, Joanna Howard, Jenna Deysher. Sixth Row: Kimberly Keniley, Whiteny Freehill, Megan 
:>ckey, Shari Barker, Julie Larsen, Gemma Wall, Danya Risinger, Chris Piatek, Stacia Martin, Bridgett O'Niell. 



Organizations 351 



_ Vohntoor 

mi Yro\c<M> 



% Volunteer Illini Projects, one of the 
largest volunteer organizations in the 
nation, was founded in 1963 by Kenn 
Allen, one of last year's Illini Home- 
coming ComeBack Guests. VIP 
started as a tutoring service for 
Champaign-Urbana schools. 

X Margaret Mead once said, "Never 
doubt that a small group of thought- 
ful, committed citizens can change 
the world; indeed, it's the only thing 
that ever does." These are the words 
that have inspired VIP for more than 
30 years, and these are the words that 
we live by. 

\ VIP is comprised of 12 service 
projects (Best Buddies, Blood, 
Daycare, Friendship, Health Needs, 
Hunger and Homelessness, Nite 
Rides, Prison Concern, Recreation, 
Senior Citizens, Special Projects and 
Tutoring) and three administrative 
projects (Finance, Financial Develop- 
ment and Public Relations) which 
provide opportunities for U of I stu- 
dents to give back to the Champaign- 
Urbana community. 

X Some of our activites include: Se- 
nior Prom, Haunted HayRack Rides, 
Special Olympics, Blood Drives and 
tutoring in local elementary schools. 

X Volunteer Illini Projects has ex- 
celled in creating and maintaining 
active volunteer programs which 
have received numerous awards and 
commendations including an Award 
of Merit from the Champaign County 
Blood Bank, a Certificate of Appre- 
ciation from the American Red Cross 
and Don Moyer Boys and Girls Club 
Outstanding Organization Award. 




:antzations 




olunteer Illini Projects: First Row: Lisa Mansueto Foley, Sameeta Sheth, Anna Marie D'Alessandro. Second Row: Chrystyna Elianshevsky, Suzanne Kucharczyk, Wendy Rogowski, 
ebecca Haremza, Brian Linscott. Third Row: Sarah Townsley, Amy Hurliman, Jessica Wells, Barb Buschman, Sreya Patri. Fourth Row: Paul Foppe, Christine Rumczikas, Christopher 
amirez, Chad Hays, George Singh. Not Pictured: Yvette Gatilao, Karen Hynes, Joy Gadrinab, Carrie Fung. 




reeks and Organizations 



mssssm 

University housing sponsored 
an Expo that took place at Florida 
Avenue, Allen and Scott Residence 
Halls. Students and staff were able 
to interact with McKinley Health 
Center and Sportwell, Career Ser- 
vices, the Counseling Center and 
the Division of Campus Recre- 
ation. The Expo was designed to 
provide information to individual 
residents, resident advisors and 
other staff members for future 
programming ideas. 

Prizes were awarded during the 
event to the winners of different 



drawings. Prizes were also given 
out at the conclusion of the Expo 
to residents who participated in 
each of the activities offered by 
the different services. 

McKinley offered fitness assess- 
ments by testing gripping ability 
and stair climbing. They also pro- 
vided free condoms and informa- 
tion about alcohol. The Career 
Services booth gave residents a 
free gift as well as information 
about resume writing, interview- 
ing, applying to graduate school, 
job searching, career exploration 



and goal clarification. The Coun- 
seling Center offered relaxation 
training and methods for measur- 
ing relaxation as well as giving 
away prizes to students who par- 
ticipated in a quiz concerning the 
Counseling Center. The Division 
of Campus Recreation offered an 
interactive dart board, table top 
football and information about 
various fitness programs. 

To top off the event, Univer- 
sity Food Services and Coca- 
Cola donated popcorn, drinks 
and cotton candy. 



Relay for Life 

The Student Alumni Association and the 
American Cancer Society held a fundraiser 
called Relay for Life . The event was held at 
Parkland College and lasted 24 hours. It 
consisted of 11 teams with 10 members 
each. The event rasied money for cancer 
research and provided funding for 
Champaign area cancer support groups. 

This was the first year the event was held 
in Champaign and between $8,000 and 
$9,000 was raised by participants who re- 
ceived donations from friends and businesses . 

SAA had planned live entertainment 
but poor weather caused some acts to 
cancel. Some student singing acts like the 
X-Tension Cords and the Rip Cords were 
able to perform. 

Also, a candle-lit vigil was held Saturday 
evening in honor of survivors of cancer and 
in rememberance of those who have died 
from the illness. 




ini tile photo 



Women's issues 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 1 1 1'H m 1 1 1 

The Panhellenic Council created the 
Women's Issues Committee to help edu- 
cate men and women about many issues 
that concern women in hopes of provid- 
ing a medium for change. The commit- 
tee is completely bipartisan and centers 
discussions around women's health is- 
sues, education, women in the work- 
place and gender issues. 

The committee is mostly made up of 
sorority women, but events were open to 
anyone who had a desire to attend. Pro- 
grams were offered every other Wednes- 
day in the Panhellenic Office. 



Alpha Phi Alpha vigil 



VIP blood drive 

^mmmmmmmmammmmmmmm\\n i m 1 1 ■ 

The Champaign County Blood Bank 
worked with Volunteer Tllini Projects to 
hold the VIP Blood Drive. The annual 
drive helps combat the blood supply 
shortage that normally occurs over the 
winter break. The blood generated is 
essential for cancer patients, burn and 
car accident victims and many other 
surgical procedures. The bank and VIP 
hoped that at least 80 people each day 
would donate to replenish the blood sup- 
plies of local hospitals. 

Many students worry that they run the 
risk of contracting HIV by giving blood. 
The last time the blood bank encountered 
HIV-contaminated blood was in 1987, and 
since then, the community has become 
more educated about the virus. People 
who are HIV-positive know they should 
not be giving blood. The needles used by 
the bank are sterile, single-use needles 
that are disposed of immediately and taken 
to an incinerator. 



iummiii 

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. presented its sec- 
ond annual vigil to promote awareness of African Ameri- 
can history. All of the 23 members of the fraternity took 
part in the vigil which lasted more than three hours on 
the south side of the Illini Union. The men, dressed in 
black and wearing chains around their arms, stood in a 
line and chanted. They recited passages from one of 
Malcolm X's last speeches and from books such as 
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison. They also read the 
names of the first generation of slave-born Africans in 
America, famous African-Americans and Africans who 
have made contributions to the world. 

The literature handed out during the ceremony said 
that the "Vigil is a symbolic representation of the collec- 
tive struggle that Afrikans live as survivors of the Holo- 
caust responsible for at least 30 million lives lost during 
the Middle Passage." 




Daily Mini file photo 



Food and clothing drive 



During the winter months, Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity coordinated a food and 
clothing drive that benefitted the Champaign County Salvation Army. Collection 
boxes were placed in fraternity and sorority houses around campus andin residence 
halls. People donated blankets, used clothing and non-perishable food items. 

The Salvation Army retrieved donations and distributed them through their 
main office, shelter and thrift store depending on the donor's request. 



Dail 



jjiuii 

clippings 



WMM/i 





motivational speaker Will 
Keim spoke to hundreds of 

*anhellenie and Interfraternity 
council members about how they 

■an improve their lives and their 
chapter in a presentation entitled 
"The Education of Character." 
Keim is a preacher and a commu- 
nications professor at Oregon 
State University in Corvallis. 
Keim travels throughout the 
country giving presentations, 
and his message has reached over 
1.25 million students at more 



than 500 campuses. 

Keim outlined seven ways for 
Greeks to ensure a strong chapter 
and to improve their lives on cam- 
pus. His seven ways were to study, 
to serve the people, open the chap- 
ters to everyone, avoid hazing, be 
sexually responsible, be sober and 
value what we have. 

He also encouraged Greeks to 
make friends with everyone re- 
gardless of sex, creed, race, color, 
national background or sexual ori- 
entation. He stressed the fact that 



people have to stop being openly 
hateful because it might turn out 
to hurt a family member of some- 
one they know. 

In addition, Keim encouraged 
Greek members to stop hazing and 
to build their plegdes instead of 
disabling them psychologically. 

Finally Keim concluded by em- 
phasizing the dangers of abusing 
sex, drugs and alcohol. He warned 
students that they could be wast- 
ing precious time if they engage in 
destructive behavior. 



Gandhi's birthday 

The Indian Student Assocation or- 
ganized a tribute to Mohandas Gandhi 
in an attempt to unify the different 
religious, racial and cultural groups 
on campus. 

The festivities honoring the 125th 
anniversary of Gandhi's birthday 
kicked off with a "Gandhi celebra- 
tion" on the south side of the Quad. 
The event was co-sponsored by the 
Afro-American Cultural Center and 
La Casa Cultural Latina. The goal of 
the events was to educate students 
about the teachings and achievements 
of Gandhi. 



Haiiukkah 



EEBEBESa 



Two university Jewish groups 
planned activities to celebrate Hanuk- 
kah, even though it is only a minor 
holiday in the Jewish tradition. Jew- 
ish Law Students Association and 
United Jewish Appeal co-sponsored a 
Hanukkah party at Gully's Riverview 
Inn. The party provided a much 
needed break for those law students 
who were studying for finals. 







Greek recruitment 



mm 



tHOVGlE 



— 



* 



4 ! 1 



-»*• 






dfcW 



—Daily Illini file photo 

The number of women rushing in August of 1994 decreased from the 
year before. There were 1,117 women this year which is 100 less than 
August of 1993. The total number of rushees has been decreasing 
gradually, but the numbers of sophomores and juniors rushing has 
been increasing. This could be a result of many incoming freshman 
choosing to wait a year and learn more about the university and Greek 
life before they make a decision to rush. 

While Panhellenic Council holds formal rush in August, the Interfra- 
ternity Council holds rush all year long. Although fraternity rush is an 
ongoing process, the most concentrated recruitment occurs during the 
three or four weeks after Quad Day. Fraternities occupied the south- 
east corner of the Quad this year in hopes of making their presence 
more visible and less intimidating. IFC also hoped that as a result, more 
men would participate in rush. 






Asian Cultural Center 




—Daily Illini file photo 

Numerous efforts have been made by university students to 
establish an Asian-American cultural center on campus. However, 
Asian-American student activists on campus feel that the university 
is far behind other schools in the Big Ten as far as meeting their 
needs is concerned. Schools such as University of California at 
Berkely and University of Michigan at Ann Arbor were praised for 
their efforts in educating the community about Asian culture. 

Because Asian-American students are overrepresented on cam- 
pus when compared to the state population, they are not considered 
by the university to be an underrepresented group. As a result, 
there is not much of a possibility of there being an Asian-American 
cultural center on campus in the near future. 



Psi Upsilon art exhibit 

Artists from the community, as 
well as some Chicago-area artists, 
were asked to donate their works 
to an art exhibit sponsored by Psi 
Upsilon fraternity. Artists were 
asked to donate $5 or a new toy for 
every three pieces of artwork they 
submitted to the exhibit. The ex- 
hibit entitled "All Through the 
House" benefited the local 
United States Marine Corps 
Toys-for-Tots charity. 

Besides the noncompetitive ex- 
hibition, there was also a "Greek 



Gallery" comprised of artwork 
submitted by artists belonging to 
fraternities and sororities on cam- 
pus. Attendees of the exhibit were 
able to pay fifty cents to vote for 
their favorite artist. The winner 
received a $50 gift certificate do- 
nated by Art Coop. 

The exhibit was open to any art- 
ist , including local school children , 
students in the University ' s School 
of Art and artists from Chicago. 
Artists were given the option to sell 
their works at the exhibit. 



A IDS Week 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion approved monetary allocations 
to support activities for AIDS Aware- 
ness Week. Two clergy persons from 
the Roman Catholic church came to 
campus to address the issue of sexual 
orientation and to emphasize toler- 
ance of AIDS , HIV and homosexuality 
in the church. 

Throughout the week, red ribbons 
were distributed to students and staff. 
Also , the Krannert Center for the Per- 
forming Arts hosted a candlelight vigil 
as a closing ceremony for the week- 
long celebration. 



Christmas trees 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 1 1 ii i ii 1 1 1 

Members of the Illini Foresters, a 
social and service organization, sold 
Scotch and White Pine trees during 
the Christmas season. The Foresters 
camped out at the Illini Plantations 
during the sale. They sold between 
800 and 1,000 trees ranging in size 
from five to 12 feet tall . The price of 
the trees varied from $15 for a five- 
foot tree to $40 for a 10-foot tree. The 
Foresters also sold garland, wreaths 
and potted spruce trees. The trees 
came from area wholesale marketers. 











linger and Homelessness Awareness 



Six campus organizations, under the 
University Office of Volunteer Programs, 
planned events to increase student aware- 
ness of the problems of hunger and home- 
less and to encourage students to take 
action to combat these problems. 

The week began at the Illini Union 
Patio where speeches were given on lo- 
cal and global homelessness. 

University housing residents who 
wished to give up their meals were able 
to sign up through various sites at the 
university residence halls. The pro- 
ceeds from the fast went to the national 
Oxfam organization. The donations 
were redistributed to starving people 



in Africa. The focus was on providing 
education and the skills necessary for 
permanent food production. 

The goal for the fundrasier was to raise 
between $4,500 and $5,000. An estimated 
2 ,500 people participated in the program. 

Proceeds earned from Band Jam fea- 
turing the Bludgers , Iconoclast and Third 
Stone also benefitted Oxfam America. 

Another event that was planned was 
a Sleepout for Homelessness. Partici- 
pants were asked to get donations or 
just come for the experience. About 20 
people were expected to spend the 
night at the southern entrance to the 
Illini Union. 








Turkey classic 



Black greek forum 



Phi Kappa Tau fraternity held their 
first annual "Turkey Classic" basket- 
ball tournament. The tournament, held 
at Huff Gymnasium, raised between 
$500 and $1000, which benefited Phi 
Kappa Tau' s national philanthropy, 
the Children's Heart Foundation. The 
event was open to anyone to enter. 

Forty -eight teams played from 10 a.m. 
until 10 p.m. in what is called a "double- 
ehmination" tournament. Team members 
payed a $40 entrance fee and received four 
free shirts. Prizes of $200, $100, $75 and 
$50 were awarded to the first, second, third 
and fourth place teams. 

Corporate sponsors Miller Lite and 
Pepsi donated such items as coolers, ban- 
ners and signs. Also, local businesses such 
as T.I.S. Bookstore and Cochrane's do- 
nated prize money and other services . 



famsssm 

Kappa Alpha Psi held a forum as part of their 82nd Founder's 
Day Celebration. The forum, entitled "In Defense of Black Frater- 
nities," focused on unity among African-American fraternities 
and resolving internal problems. 

Representatives of Black Greek Council fraternities Kappa 
Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Alpha Phi Alpha and Phi Beta Sigma 
were present at the forum. The major point of discussion was the 
division between African-American Greek fraternities and the 
stereotypes and generahzations made about them. 

Fraternity members stressed how much the different houses do 
for the community and that if they do not unify and change the way 
people think, black greeks might disappear from campus. 




Daily Illini file photc 



Tutoring program 



EfflEBEZa 



A tutoring program for the chil- 
dren of dining service employees 
was started two and a half years 
ago by Joni Elsenpeter, Housing 
Division Assistant, and Mary 
Cloos, Urbana South area coordi- 
nator. The program began because 
the children of dining service em- 
ployees needed extra academic as- 
sistance. The goal of the program 
was to motivate the children to 



study hard and become produc- 
tive members of society. 

All students were welcome to join 
the program. Student tutors 
worked about two hours each week, 
and the program, which sponsored 
approximately 60 students, had 
around 30 volunteer tutors. 

The program tried to pair each 
tutor with a student in order to 
work one-on-one. They met twice 



a week for one hour in places such 
as the public library or the Don 
Moyer Boys and Girls Club. 

The tutors received satisfaction 
from helping the children and from 
being given the opportunity to give 
something back to the people who 
work in the residence halls. The 
majority of the volunteers are un- 
dergraduate students who live in 
the residence halls. 



Make a Difference Day 



People Pride Week 



The University Young Alumni Association and the Se- 
nior Alumni Association sponsored "Make A Difference 
Day." They asked spectators of the Illinois-Michigan 
football game to donate to the "Food For Families Food 
Drive." All nonperishable food items went to the Eastern 
Illinois Food Bank. 

The United Way also sponsored events for the football 
weekend. They teamed up area adults with children in 
hopes of cleaning up the surroundings. Adults from the 
Maple Neighborhood Block Club cleaned up the railroad 
tracks from Randolph to Prairie streets, and children 
and students teamed up to clean Birch village, a 
Champaign low-income housing project. 



Lecture program 



Ktmuussm 

Sigma Chi fraternity alumni created a program to bring 
lecturers of different fields to the Urbana campus. The 
program was established to allow experts in a wide vari- 
ety of fields to participate in lectures and seminars at the 
university. They planned to fund the program through an 
annual alumni donation of $10,000. 

Because the program was successful at Miami Univer- 
sity in Oxford and Indiana University in Bloomington, 
alumni from the University of Illinois chapter of Sigma 
Chi believed the program would work well here also. 

Scholars coming to the university had to be recom- 
mended by faculty and the recommendations were for- 
warded to a special selection committee. 

Members of Sigma Chi Fraternity believed the program 
would be beneficial to the members as well as to the 
university community and local residents. 



WBMSBMM 

The University Residence Halls held a week- 
long celebration of diversity in late January. 
Events ranged from panel discussions to an 
ethnic "Foodapalooza." 

Participants included the Asian American As- 
sociation, the Central Black Student Union, La 
Casa Student Organization, Caribbean Students 
United, the NAACP college chapter, the Illini 
Union Board and Residential Life. 

Events were aimed at confronting different 
issues of diversity such as ethnicity, religion, 
sexuality and ableism. The theme for the week 
was appropriately represented in its jingle "It's 
about U and I don't UC?" 

Some of the events included a "Taste of LAR" 
at Lincoln Avenue Residence Halls , "Multicultural 
Jeopardy" at Florida Avenue Residence Halls 
and a multicultural comedy show called "Differ- 
ent Places Different Faces" starring Tracey Rose 
and Spicy Clamato at the Illini Union. 

The week culminated in a fashion show titled 
"Images of You" at Allen Hall. The show dis- 
played clothing from a variety of ethnic groups 
and cultures. 



| 



9 



i 






clii 



ungs 



v- 



% 




e have gone from immature, scared freshmen to mature, 
Confident seniors. Our years at the U of I have changed us 
from who we once were to who we are now. Each of us has 
changed in our own way. We may have been influenced by 
attending classes, making new lifelong friends, joining organizations 
or sports or just hanging out on the Quad. 

Along with us, the U of I has also changed. The new computerized ID card 
system has been fully implemented and, although most of us will not be able to 
take advantage of it, registration will soon become computerized. No one could 
have missed all of the construction that went on around campus. New buildings, 
remodeled ones and a revamped Sixth Street gave U of I's campus a slight facelift 
while making some of our lives miserable for a little while. The Illini Union 
received a new addition called the Courtyard Cafe. This is a place for students to 
study as well as be entertained by various artists that visit the U of I. Also during 
our stay at this university, the Greek organizations went through some major 
changes. Many of the sororities on campus shortened their pledge program and 
made initiating into various houses easier for incoming pledges. 

The world we live in has also gone through some changes in the last few years. 
We have directed more of our attention to minority groups and their needs as well 
as the needs of those who are disabled. More adaptations are being made to 
buildings, not only on campus, but also wherever we go. Minority groups are 
sponsoring events such as International Fest, their own Greek organizations and 
classes featuring specific cultural histories and issues. 

Whether we decide to go out into the real world to work or stay in school to 
further our education, one more chapter of our lives has ended and another is 
about to begin. As we graduate we have many things to remember, such as all of 
those lectures we slept through, professors who took extra time with us, long walks 
across campus and especially our friends. In order to reach this point in our lives 
we have all had to endure some degree of change either in our personal lives, 
scholastic careers or circle of friends. 



DEGREES OF 




Debbie Williams 
Graduates Editor 




at, Drink andbe Merry 



Although "Tailgate" may sound like 
"Watergate," there is nothing in common 
between the two except for the attention 
each has received. "The [football] game 
wouldn't be as fun and exciting without 
tailgating. You can't attend a football game 
here without at least checking out the 
action across from the stadium and IMPE. 
It's just one of those things that you must 
experience during your college career - 
besides the night life," said Kathy Pagakis, 
sophomore in LAS. 

In addition to the action out on the 
fields, many campustown bars opened 
early Saturday mornings for special pre- 
party tailgating of their own. "It doesn't 
matter if you have a tent with your frater- 



nity, sorority or any other organization. 
Everyone is around getting psyched for 
the game. It's singing and dancing, barbe- 
cuing and grilling. It was also a great way 
to meet a lot of people," said Jenny Kanaris, 
sophomore in Education. 

One big aspect of tailgating is the to- 
getherness of all the fans. "Everyone's 
together - talking, drinking and playing 
games gets them into the mood. And for 
that little bit of time there's no worry in the 
world - just fun," said Anne Finley, fresh- 
man in LAS. 

Not only were the fans getting psyched 
for the game, but they were playing the 
game as well. "You find your spot out on 
the field, and just play football until it's 



time to go watch your team. It's the best 
way to hang out with friends," said Amy 
Pitts, freshman in ALS. 

Everyone hopes for another Illini vic- 
tory, showing support for the team. "Tail- 
gating before the Iowa game was probably 
the best because everyone pulled together 
their Illini pride, and that feeling could be 
felt through every fan in the fields," added 
Pagakis. 

Francine Love, an international student 
from Scotland, and junior in LAS, stated, 
"We don't have anything like this at home. 
The enthusiasm is so intense, and the 
excitement builds and builds." 

Until Tailgate '95... 

— Story by Kristina Castillo 




Josh Hartford, sophmore at Illinois Central Col- 
lege, picks up a plate of hot dogs during the tailgate 
festivities before the 1994 homecoming game. 
Tailgating before Illinois football games has be- 
come a big part of the Illini football experience. 

Freshman Matt Chatwell picks up a hot dog before 
Illinois' homecoming game. The Illini lost the 
game to Purdue 16-22. 




-John Hanson 





Marja-Leena Aaltonen Gurnee 
Nicole Aardema Naperville 
Dennis Abad Aurora 
Nur Abdul-Rahman Champaign 
Yoshiko Abe Bloomington 
Ivan Abernathy Champain 
Amy Abler Mount Pleasant Mich. 
Mayrling Abrenica Gurnee 

Kahlid Abu-Shalback La Grange 
Snigdha Acharya Elk Grove 
Dawn Achtenberg Palos Heights 
Karen Adamik Tebbetts, Mo. 
Angela Adams Champaign 
Elizabeth Adams Wilmette 
Eric Adams Owensboro, Ky. 
Belinda Adjabeng Chicago 

Tabetha Ahrends Pontiac 
Jill Ahrens East Peoria 
Jeremy Aidlen Morganville. N.J. 
Ender Akan Naperville 
Kyle Akerman Wheaton 
Yukari Akiyama Northbrook 
Jennifer Alberici Arlington Heights 
Clifford Alberts Hickory Hills 

Michelle Albovias Orland Park 
Mina Alex Barrington 
Amy Allen Waukegan 
Derek Allen Milton, Fla. 
Gracie Allen Champaign 
Kirsten Allen Southlake, Texas 
Barry Allison Coal Valley 
Melissa Alog Skokie 

Augusto Alonto Chicago 
Stephanie Alsberg Champaign 
Brian Altenbaumer Decatur 
Lisa Alvarez Carol Stream 
Jenifer Alward Urbana 
Melinda Alwardt Paris 
Kevin An Elgin 
Brian Anast Lake St. Louis, Mo. 

Kiego Ance West Dundee 
Barbara Andersen Western Springs 
Majbritt Andersen Champaign 
Amy Anderson Marseilles 
Caprice Anderson Chicago 
Julie Anderson Bourbonnais 
Linda Anderson Chicago 
Lisa Anderson Chicago 

Scott Anderson Dayton, Ohio 
Traci Anderson Grissom 
Benjamin Andrews Champaign 
Salma Ansari Pittsfield 
James Anthony Schaumburg 
Dion Antonopoulos Downers Grove 
Donald Appleman Champaign 
Monica Arciga Aurora 

Asta Ardickas Downers Grove 
Julie Argentin Northbrook 
Willis Armstead Champaign 
Catherine Armstrong Washington 
Jonathan Arndt Darien 
Talley Arnold Champaign 
Leslie Arseneau Buffalo Grove 
Shelby Artime Collinsville 



Aaltonen — Artime 363 



Denise Aruldoss Oak Lawn 

Chad Ascar Chicago 

Damon Ascolani Palos Hills 

Elizabeth Asfaw Urbana 

Scott Augustine Chicago 

Debbie Austin Girard 

Jeanne Aver Park Ridge 

Amanda Azuse Glenview 

Linda Babelnieks Wauconda 

Christina Backe Dundee 

Christine Baddick Bartlett 

Elizabeth Baer Highland Park 

Pia Baertschi Urbana 

Kimberly Bairn Lincolnshire 

Jennifer Bainbridge Woodhull 

Akilah Baker Chicago 

Eileen Baker Indian Head Park 

Molly Baker Ottawa 

Yolanda Baker Sanford, Fla. 

Maria Baksay Hinsdale 

Douglas Bakshis Woodridge 

Alan Balaoing Waukegan 

Stephen Balek Washington 

Michael Balian Hickory Hills 

Alison Ballance Boulder 

Steven Bange Quincy 

Angela Baranzelli Edenburg 

Jacquerae Barber Maywood 

Jeffrey Barcalow Mount Zion 

Julianna Barker Urbana 

Ronda Barnes Champaign 

Julie Barrett McHenry 

Christopher Barretto Palos Heights 

Kelly Bartell Carthage 

Andrew Bartlow Bowen 

Julie Barton Byron 

Peter Basler Verona, N.J. 

Jennifer Bates Fairview Heights 

Rachael Bates Belleville 

Divina Battung Orland Park 

Frederick Bauer O' Fallon 

Kimberly Bauer Cissna Park 

Tyler Bauer Cissna Park 

Kelly Bauman Huntley 

Keena Baumgartner Windsor 

Susan Bax St. Charles 

Michael Baxter Fults 

Laura Beaudry Arlington Heights 

Heather Beckman Naperville 

Hugh Beeler Springfield 

Bradley Beeuwsaert Cord Valley 

Jeffrey Behme Carlinville 

Gail Behrends Havana 

Theodore Behreus Shattue 

John Bekas Chicago 

Kristen Belin Chicago 

Suzanne Bell South Barrington 

Nolan Bello Streamwood 

Anup Bendre Northbrook 

Michael Benivegna Belleville 

Kresin Benner Homer 

Kevin Bennett Dwight 

William Bentlage Walshville 

Michael Bentley Dolton 




Graduates 





Janice Berbaum Champaign 
Alice Bereman Montgomery 
Aylin Berent Houston. Texas 
Peter Berg Danville 
Alexis Bergan Danville 
Michael Bergman Glenview 
Erika Bergsrud Lake Bluff 
.[anna Bergstrom South Holland 

Douglas Berkman Champaign 
Korie Bernas Westmont 
Barbara Berry Chicago 
Suzanne Berry Fairmount 
Katherine Berthusen Rockford 
Jon Beverly Elgin 
Jennifer Beyers Manville 
Kevin Biebel Riverside 

Stacy Bilyeu Mokena 
Scott Biros Mazon 
Shane Bishir Palos Park 
Mark Bishop Wilmette 
Andrew Bjornberg Orland Park 
John Blackford Rankin 
Heather Blacklock Rockford 
Edward Blade Greenup 

Michelle Bleich Roberts 
Gary Blickhan Quincy 
Mark Blickhan Quincy 
Timothy Bliss Springfield 
Debra Block Northbrook 
Tony Bloemer Effingham 
John Blomquist Arlington Heights 
Alan Blonz Morton Grove 

Brandon Blough Springfield 
Tracey Blubaum Clay City 
Jacqueline Blue Chicago 
Michael Blumenthal Skokie 
Cathy Blythe Lake Forest 
Robert Bodrogi Champaign 
Brian Boettcher Foster City, Calif. 
Amy Bogle Flora 

Richard Bogoslaw Chicago 
Laura Bogusch Downers Grove 
Donnelly Bohan Springfield 
Kelly Bolero Woodridge 
Elizabeth Bollmeier Urbana 
Joann Bechtold Schaumburg 
Ronald Bonesz McHenry 
Martin Bonick Champaign 

Boon Wee Ti Champaign 
Suzanne Bornkamp Rockford 
Jennifer Borror Morris 
Michael Boston Roodhouse 
Karen Bott Brookfield, Wis. 
Kevin Bowers Covina, Calif. 
Leslie Boyd Chicago 
Christoper Boyer Savoy 

Daniel Boysen Chicago 
John Bozarth Decatur 
Deana Bracken Homewood 
Patrick Bradshaw East Peoria 
Matthew Brady Libertyville 
Rebecca Brandi Moline 
Michelle Bransford Danville 
Margaret Brazzale Matteson 



Aruldoss — Brazzale 365 



Kristin Breading Carbondale 

Marnie Breen Northbrook 

Russell Breimeier Urbana 

Julie Bremer East Peoria 

Jason Bretz Country Club Hills 

Jennifer Brewbaker Stockton 

Jennifer Brinkman Decatur 

Jennette Brister Matteson 

Karen Brockelman Cape Coral, Fla. 

Ben Brockett Omaha 

Julie Brodrueck Northbrook 

Bridgit Broms Springfield 

Cheryl Broneck Dixon 

Matthew Brooks Glenview 

Brad Brown Champaign 

Chester Brown Chicago 

Dorian Brown East St. Louis 

Greg Brown Ottawa 

Jill Brown Washington 

Michelle Brown Elgin 

Sarah Brown Columbia, Mo. 

Scott Brown Champaign 

Steven Brown Elk Grove 

Susan Brown Marissa 

Barbara Bruce Waukegan 

Lori Bruce Carlinville 

Virginia Bruce Dekalb 

Cindi Bruch Byron 

Kevin Brumund Joliet 

Kristina Brushaber Elk Grove Village 

Donald Brust Spring Valley 

Kathleen Bruzek Barrington 

Lisa Brya Champaign 

Eric Bryerton Schaumburg 

Gordon Buchanan Buffalo Grove 

Brian Buchheit Carlyle 

Christopher Budde Highland 

Mark Budelier Urbana 

Claire Buenaflor Chicago 

Danielle Buente Belleville 

Dennis Bui Urbana 

Mark Buisseret Skokie 

Deborah Bujnowski Mount Prospect 

Jamie Bukvich Bristol 

Diego Bullon Schuaumburg 

Isabelo Bungcayao Willowbrook 

Michael Bunting McHenry 

Barbara Burke Champaign 

Corina Burke Chicago 

Patrick Burke Roselle 

Anne Burkybile Rantoul 

Carrie Burkybile Rantoul 

Edward Burns Broomall. Pa. 

Derek Busboom Ludlow 

Barbara Buschmann Kildeer 

Laura Bush Edwards 

Diana Butler Forest View, Fla. 

Jennifer Butler Ingleside 

Stephen Butler Freeport 

Chad Butzow Woodland 

Jennifer Butzow Champaign 

Karen Bychowski Mount Prospect 

Aaron Byron East Alton 

Eddie Bvun Hoffman Estates 



I : 



Graduates 






Serens Caan Naperville 
Brian Cabote Schaumburg 
Dan Cacioppa Champaign 
Mary Cain Urbana 
Amy Caldwell Champaign 
Marino Camaioni Urbana 
Nick Campanile Orland Park 
John Campbell Chicago 

Michael Campbell Columet City 
Sally Campbell Urbana 
Sarah Camper River Forest 
Nashonne Candler Chicago 
Michael Capbell Herscher 
Donna Capers Chicago 
Carolyn Caponigri Downers Grove 
Allen Carley Park Forest 

Peter Carlin Lombard 
Mark Carlin Carol Stream 
Christopher Carls Peoria 
Jason Carlson Rockford 
Jennifer Carlson Schaumburg 
Jennifer Carmichael Rochelle 
Sara Carson Flagstaff, Ariz. 
Cathy Caruso Glenwood 

Sharon Casey Urbana 
Steve Casey Naperville 
Dennis Casimiro Oak Park 
Cassandra Casis Gurnee 
Melba Castillo Morton Grove 
Gina Catania Champaign 
Anthony Catsaros Northbrook 
Shirley Caudle Dakota 







ur Beloved "Firsts 



99 



What else could we mean by "firsts" other 
:han our first roommates? "My first room- 
Kte?!" said Jeann^D. Schell, senior in ALS. 
'What roommt^! If she ever spent the night 
:here [in our room), maybe I could tell you." 

Enough said there. Well, for those of 
y"ou who did have daily contact with your 
: reshman roommates, old pals or new, in 
good times and bad, those "firsts" are the 
Dnly thing incoming students think about. 
'Is he cool?" "Is she blonde?" "I wonder 
vvhat her major is." And the question in 
many incoming students' minds, "Does 
he/she party?" 

"My freshman roommate woke up the 
entire 6-pack one night [due to her incessant 
screaming and crying] after a trip to the bars, 
where she had seen her ex with someone 
new," said Michelle Hallam, junior in LAS. 

Hallam also remembered a different occa- 
sion. "One Saturday morning she went run- 
ning after a drunken Friday night. She came 
Dack about five minutes later in utter shock 



because she hurled in front of hundreds of 
tailgaters," Hallam added. 

Is it not the job of a freshman roommate 
to take care of the other no matter how many 
shots of tequila she insisted she could handle, 
or what type of bad cafeteria food he ate? 

For example, Lori K. Hamburg, senior in 
Agriculture, said, "My freshman roommate 
was a friend of mine since first grade. We 
went against the odds of living with some- 
one you already know. For our first college 
final, we went to Perkins to study all night, 
drinking numerous pots of coffee. At three 
o'clock in the morning, five hours before our 
final, she started to feel scratchy. Fifteen 
minutes later hives were all over her body. 
Baby powder didn't help, and neither did 
Benadryl, so at 4:00 a.m. we were on our 
way to Covenant. At 6:30 a.m., her hives 
started to go away, and she was excused 
from the final. I, on the other hand, still had 
to take it. It all worked out, but Valerie still 
is hesitant to drink coffee." 



On the flip side, there are always the good 
stories. "My freshman roommate and I got 
along great from the first day we met," said 
Christina Zolli, junior in Education. "I got 
used to her constantly watching television 
and going to bed at 10:00 p.m. every night, 
and she put up with my late night telephone 
fights with my boyfriend. We're still great 
friends and roommates after three years." 

After all, it is the good stories we like to 
hear. If we add a little spice to this good side, 
we get the roommate of Sunne Clark, junior 
in LAS. "My roommate was fun to be with 
because she was always into something 
mischievous," said Clark. "In fact, a couple 
of the girls in the hall - including her - were 
kicked out of the dorms the day before her 
last final exam. She was given 60 minutes to 
get out. What a way to end freshman year!" 

Nevertheless, our "firsts" are special to us, 
even if it is because we did not have to live 
with them again! 

— Story by Kristina Castillo 



Breading — Caudle 367 



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or Future Excellence 



For many students, graduate school was the 
next step after finishing their undergraduate 
studies. The question was, did undergraduate 
education really prepare a student for gradu- 
ate work? Some students found a way to get 
hands-on experience with research work. 

Angela Evans, senior in Agriculture, re- 
ceived a pamphlet for undergraduate research 
projects. The pamphlet offered the opportu- 
nity to work on a research project. Evans 
proceeded to ask around and found a profes- 
sor who was working with sweeteners. 

"I ran taste tests with different types of 
sweeteners to see what type of results I would 
get," Evans said. "I had ten subjects and gave 
them ten samples four different times." 

With the results in, Evans wrote a paper 
describing her findings from the taste tests. It 
would then be submitted in a competition. 

Evans participated in this for the experience 
it gave her. "I never got experience in the 
laboratory, this gave it to me," Evans said. 

Kristina Hiney, senior in Agriculture, also 
participated in an undergraduate research 

Christa Behrendt, a graduate student in Agri- 
culture, and Kristina Hiney, senior in Agricul- 
ture, draw blood from a weanling. The wean- 
lings were bled every three hours during a 24 
hour period to determine serum mineral lev- 
els. 



project. Previous to her work in the Fall of 
1994, Hiney had done two previous projects 
with a different professor in the animal science 
department. 

Her work for Fall of 1994 dealt with nutri- 
tional trials on yearlings, horses under the age 
of one. "I fed the horses high and low calcium 
diets to observe the effects this diet might 
have," Hiney commented. 

The project lasted for one month. "I was 
also looking for whether there was diurnal 
rhythms or a fed/fasted effect," Hiney said. "I 
wanted to know whether it was a time effect 
or because the weanlings had not eaten." 

Like Evans, Hiney stressed how helpful the 
program was for her. "It gave me a head start 
on research for my graduate work," Hiney 
said. 

Associate Dean William L. George from the 
college of Agriculture also commented on the 
success of the program. "The program was 
working extremely well," George said. He did 
have one regret for the program: "I wish more 
people would become involved." 



George felt that this program gave under- 
graduates the opportunity to explore research 
for graduate school. The program was open to 
juniors and seniors with GPA's of 4.0 and 
above. "It allowed undergrads who were aca- 
demically able the opportunity to explore the 
world of research," George stated. 

George said that he did hope "to expand the 
money available to the students. They put a lot 
of work into this." He felt that by expanding 
the awards to students more would be willing 
to apply for this. 

There were a lot of benefits to the program. 
"Many students had their work published or 
were asked to present their findings at profes- 
sional conferences," George said. "Some stu- 
dents even went directly into a Ph.D. pro- 
gram." 

For many students, research projects be- 
came a large part of their lives. The under- 
graduate research project allowed them to get 
a head start on the work they may do for the 
rest of their lives. 

— Story by Jennifer Arendarczyk 




— Tim Hutchinson 



370 Graduates 





Donna Cecchini Grayslake 
Jacob Cedergreen Ladue, Mo. 
Brent Centlivre Chicago 
Tham Chaiket Chicago 
Debasish Chakrabarti Aurora 
Edward Chan Louisville, Ky. 
Alyssa Chang Frankfort 
Fred Chang Marlton, N.J. 

Grace Chang Champaign 
Mi Chang Peoria 
Eric Chapman Bushnell 
Karen Charland Oswego 
Preeti Chaudhari Elgin 
Ching-Pying Chen Champaign 
Herbert Chen Bellevue, Wash. 
Sejal Chheda Rockford 

Jennifer Chiarito Naperville 
David Childers Mahomet 
Marlene Chin Palatine 
Cynthia Chiu Schaumburg 
Roger Chiu Chesterfield, Mo. 
Krystyna Chlebek Chicago 
Anthony Chobot Orland Park 
Amy Chou Naperville 

Jocelyn Chong Champaign 
Mindy Chong Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
Albert Chow Penfield, NY. 
Truda Chow Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Daniel Christ Galesburg 
Margaret Christensen Chicago 
James Christian Champaign 
William Chrones Burbank 

Maribeth Churak Urbana 
Donna Ciesla Champaign 
Elizabeth Ciesla Hoffman Estates 
Greg Ciesla Champaign 
Steven Ciszewski Orland Park 
Kim Clarkson Newburyport, Maine 
Matthew Clayton O'Fallon 
Michelle Cler Philo 

Scott Clinch Dunlap 
Julia Cebulski Mahomet 
Jason Cochran Cobden 
Nancy Coddington Champaign 
Alison Coen Woodside, N.Y. 
Sheryl Cohen Champaign 
Liza Coleman Urbana 
Tim Coleman Wheaton 

Dan Collins Brookfield 
William Condon Champaign 
Molly Conneen Champaign 
James Connell Champaign 
Thembi Conner Champaign 
Melissa Conroy Roselle 
Patricia Conti Streamwood 
Colleen Coogan Chicago 

Rachel Coomes Vernon Hills 
Tari Coon Orland Park 
David Cooper Arlington Heights 
Jamie Cooper Edwardsville 
Jill Cosme Oak Lawn 
Joseph Cotner Champaign 
Portland Cottom Harrisburg 
Robert Counce Peoria 



Cecchini — Counce 371 







I 



Thomas Courson Allerton 

Scott Couwels Genesco 

Catherine Covert Urbana 

Kiersten Crafton Homewood 

Rachel Craig New Canton 

Robert Grain Urbana 

Christopher Crawford Champaign 

Matthew Cremens Champaign 

Julie Croegaert Champaign 

Jennifer Crump Jacksonville 

Jeff Crusius Peoria 

Jennifer Cuasay Chicago 

Brian Culberson Champaign 

Patrick Cullinan Champaign 

Kimberly Cummings Chicago 

Sheila Currie Rockford 

Tyanika Curry Centralia 

Melissa Curtis Bolingbrook 

Nathan Curtis Skokie 

Mark Cvengros Naperville 

Amy Czarnowski Chicago 

Jennifer Czech Palos Heights 

Cynthia Czop Joliet 

Joel Dabisch Bolingbrook 

Carolyn Daly Kildeer 

Karen Daly Chicago 

Eric Damitz Rock Falls 

Keith Daniels Palatine 

Amy Dausman Decatur 

Jennifer Davis Ballwin, Mo. 

Jennifer Davis Altamont 

Julia Davis Normal 

Randel Davis Ogden 

Rich Davis Oak Park 

Ryan Davis Elkhart 

Andrew Day St. Louis, Mo. 

Christy Day Sugar Grove 

Jan DeCoursey Wheaton 

Mary Debatin Champaign 

Gwendolyn Debrower Urbana 

William Dec Chicago 

Craig Deelsnyder Fulton 

Daniel Degroat Belleville 

Cynthia Dehaan Richmond 

Ana Delaespriella McHenry 

Annette Delgado Sparland 

Jeremy Dellavalle Peoria 

Jonathan Demaster Champaign 

Jennifer Demay Towanda 

Sarah Demeyer Grasylake 

Robert Denardo Champaign 

Kristen Denison Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Matthew Dennis Springfield 

Melany Dennis Rockford 

Jill Dennor Waukegan 

Rex Deolt Champaign 

Arda Derat Chicago 

Sue Derdzinski Niles 

Eva Dervin Chicago 

Sonia Desai Rolling Meadows 

Paul Desousa Chicago 

Brian Deters Quincy 

Jean Detmer Champaign 

Amy Dever Woodridge 




372 Graduates 




Colleen Dodson Calumet City 
Bryan Dohman Calumet City 
Marge Donoghue Cabery 
Barbara Doran Crystal Lake 
Craig Doran Princeton 
Michael Dorfman Mortons Grove 
Doug Dossey Eureka 
Jason Dove Champaign 

Peter Dragic Orland Park 
Stephanie Drain Chicago 
Theodore Drain Washington 
Jennifer Drew Arlington Heights 
Doreen Drews Berwyn 
David Dribin Champaign 
Jennifer Duclos Sleepy Hollow 
James Duecker Streamwood 

Colin Duffield Lansing 
Michelle Duffield O' Fallon 
Steven Duffy Chicago 
Jill Duin Rock Island 
Matthew Duncan Millstadt 
Scott Duncan Naperville 
Jonathan Dunn Deerfield 
Laura Dunn Windsor 




he Summer Scene 



Looking for a good time during summer 
break? Tired of die same old hometown 
scene? Well Campustown sure was the place 
to be during this past summer break - all the 
benefits of college without the school! Even 
those who enrolled in summer school at the 
U of I or Parkland College relaxed and 
enjoyed quiet nights at the infamous crowded 
and noisy bars of the school year. 

"The good thing about summer was that 
everyone hung out all together because 
there weren't a lot of people here," said 
Kam's employee Chris Economopoulos, se- 
nior in LAS. "You meet a lot more people 
than you would meet during the year, and 
you get to know them a lot better. During the 
school year there isn't that much opportunity." 

Jennifer Swinehart, R and R's Sports Grill 
employee and senior in CBA, agreed. "Sum- 
mer is great. It moved at a slower pace. 
There was more of a relaxed environment - 



no lines to get into the bars, no huge crowds 
to fight inside, parking spaces everywhere 
and no lines for beer. Most people hung out 
in the same places, so you got to know the 
people whose faces you recognize during 
the school year." 

"Specials?" some inquired. "There are spe- 
cials all year long," said Swinehart. "At R and 
R's we had half price appetizers every night 
after 5:00 p.m.. You could come and have 
your dinner really cheap and have money 
left for a couple of drinks. All beers were 
$1.50 as opposed to the $2 bottles during the 
year, and drafts were always 90 cents. We 
had a margarita grill on Thursdays." The bar 
was decorated with balloons, which was 
different from the normal scene. There was 
also more trivia and giveaways. 

Mmmm...Good so far. And for a twist - 
White Horse Inn, which may have had a 
reputation for a more relaxed and calm 



environment during the school year, had a 
booming business in the summer. "One 
reason summer was better was because of 
our beer garden," said Kevin Holmes, White 
Horse employee and senior in CBA. "People 
liked to be outside enjoying the weather 
instead of a small and smoky room. Business 
was also good due to our food specials like 
10 cent buffalo wings on Tuesdays. We 
sponsored a men's softball team, so due to 
the sporting events going on in the area we 
were packed. The guys could sit outside 
with their buddies; they could be extra lazy 
after hard games because we had waitresses 
outside for the patrons." 

The flipside? Well, for those O'Malley's or 
Bub's Pub and Pizza fans, they were closed 
during the summer months. No worry, 
though. The excitement still lingered five 
minutes after 1 a.m. along Green Street. 

— Story by Kristina Castillo 



Courson — Dunn, L. 373 



Tracey Dunn Champaign 

Jeffrey Dunning Belleville 

Jenel Durbin Decatur 

Danielle Duss Geneva 

Michelle Duval Herscher 

Jason Duzan Colfax 

Susan Eads Kane 

Jill Eberle Wyoming 

Julie Eck Elmhurst 

Scott Eck Urbana 

Stephanie Ecklund Springfield 

Toinette Eddie Roscoe 

Kristin Eder Palos Hills 

Jason Edwards Evansville 

Latrice Eggleston Chicago 

Jeanette Eihusen Appleton, Wis. 

Dana Eisenmenger Pesotum 

Jennifer Elder Lemont 

David Eldridge Steeleville 

Chrystyna Eliashevsky Deer Park 

Rebecca Ellingson Champaign 

Sandra Ellis Champaign 

Shannon Ellison Chicago 

Edward Emaci Champaign 

Pamela Engelke Midlothian 

Matthew England Champaign 

Heather Ensor Peoria 

Robert Erickson Urbana 

Ben Ernst Champaign 

Melanie Ernsting-Gargano Elk Grove Village 

Jody Errandi Wood River 

James Escobar River Forest 

Heather Esmond Champaign 

Angela Evans Bluffs 

Wendy Evans Champaign 

Michele Evert Lake Forest 

Norah Faigen Champaign 

Samantha Farber Naperville 
Kathleen Farley Oak Park 
Caitlin Farney Glen Ellyn 

Sarah Farney Glen Ellyn 

Lisa Farrell Orland Park 

Scott Farrell Urbana 

Steve Fask La Grange Park 

Teresa Fawer Tremont 

Danaka Fay Wasdsworth 

Megan Feeney Homewood 

Laurie Fehr Davis 

Natalie Feibish Urbana 

Valerie Feist Princeton 

Brian Feld Champaign 

Shari Feldbau Dix Hills, NY. 

Bradley Feldman Champaign 

Naomi Feldman Northbrook 

Laura Feldsien Cary 

Nicole Felleti Arlington Heights 

Gayle Fengel Canton 

Frank Ferraiolo Des Plaines 

Shana Ferrall Rockford 

Heidi Ferrer Barlett 

Kristin Ferry Rockford 

April Fetzer Chicago 

Inna Fialko Lincolnwood 

Monica Fidler Sycamore 











374 Graduates 




Josh Fienberg Lincolnwood 
Victoria Filliung Lisle 
Kristen Fimmen Lisle 
Lisa Fischer Elmhurst 
Lisa Fischer Champaign 
Ari Fisz Champaign 
Cary Fitzmaurice Champaign 
John Fitzpatrick Oak Lawn 

Kevin Fitzpatrick Chicago 
Mia Fleming Chicago 
Michelle Flomenhoft Riverwoods 
Desi Flores Norridge 
Juan Flores Chicago 
Stuart Floyd Decatur 
Eric Foerster Paxton, Mass. 
Stephanie Foerster Barrington 

Angela Foley Lebanon 
Jennifer Foley Plantation, Fla. 
Deangela Foote Metamora, Fla. 
Tim Fosnot Batavia 
Joella Foster Champaign 
Amy Fox Geneva 
Carolyn Fox Champaign 
James Frame Granby, Colo. 

Darcy Francis Decatur 
Jason Frank Springfield 
Kathryn Frank Itasca 
Pamela Frazer Palos Heights 
Amy Frederickson Coal City 
Jamila Freelain Rockford 
Angela Freels Champaign 
Jennifer Frey Chicago 

Michael Friedlander Chicago 
Eric Friedman Champaign 
Lainee Frizzo Alton 
Simon Frumkin Buffalo Grove 
Jessica Fuller Urbana 
Lucy Fung Gurnee 
Peggy Funk Calumet City 
Charles Fuoco Glendale Heights 

Nancy Gaffner Greenville 
Kevin Gaffney Crystal Lake 
Daniel Gaines Champaign 
Nick Gallegos Rockford 
Elisa Gallo Highland Park 
Patricia Galvan Chicago 
Evangeline Galvez Oak Lawn 
Michael Galvin Oakbrook 

Jeffrey Gamlin Rockford 
Tamara Gammill Champaign 
Christopher Gange Lombard 
Gina Gansmann St. Jacob 
Nancy Garcia Champaign 
Omar Garcia Champaign 
Jenny Gardner Mattoon 
Elizabeth Garibay Chicago 

Amy Garrett Brighton 
Matthew Garrett Edwards 
John Garwal Libertyville 
Jennifer Gassner Des Plaines 
Rachel Gastalt Orland Park 
Michelle Gazdik Elgin 
Chris Gelino Momence 
Erika Geltz Peoria 



Dunn — Geltz 375 



ill 



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5 




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A 




/ 




ntbe Other Side 



Nearly everyone respects the burly bounc- 
ers guarding Kams' doorway. Is this power- 
ful job all that it's cracked up to be? Andrew 
Porter, junior in Education, works four 
hours a week as a bouncer at Kam's. 
"Being a bouncer has both its pros and 
cons," stated Porter. 

Porter believes that the large number of 
people he and other bouncers see in one 
night is a major advantage to his job. "The 
freshmen are especially interesting to watch 
since they are so new to the bar scene," said 
Porter. He also commented that he has met 
many new people as they wait in line to 
enter Kams' doors. 

No matter how packed a bar is with the 
weekend crowd, there are always a few 
nightly regulars to spice things up. Rodney 
Nash, recent graduate from LAS working as 
the kitchen manager at Joe's Brewery, says 
that one of the highlights of working at Joe's 
is a 60-year-old regular. 



Jason Lee, a junior in Engineering and a 
bouncer at Kam's, checks Doug Barnes' 
ID at the door. Barnes is a junior in LAS. 



Every afternoon this gentleman strolls 
into the bar under the assumption that he is 
either a sailor or the world's best pool 
champion and must convince everyone else. 
He uses a change of character and actions to 
fit his whim and challenges others to pool 
tournaments. Basically he stays and drinks 
himself under the table. One time he was so 
drunk by the time he got to Joe's that he 
literally crawled in the door. The employees 
called a cab to take him away and threw him 
out of the bar. 

Nash commented that this gentleman is a 
great story teller even though it is obvious 
that he tells lies. This comical man livens up 
Joe's afternoon shift and gives the workers 
some live entertainment. A bar just isn't a bar 
without a few wackos to add excitement for 
the employees. 

A clown side to working in the bars is 
cleaning up after closing time. However, an 
even greater downfall for Kams' bouncer, Por- 



ter, is the annoying drunkards who often get 
out of hand and attempt to create a scene or 
even a brawl that he has to deal with. These 
brawls can often be hard for Porter to handle 
because he is not the typical muscular bouncer. 
"In fact," he said, "I am the smallest bouncer 
employed by Kam's." 

Since his size does not overly intimidate the 
drunkards, Porter often worries when the first 
punch will come at him. One incident that 
Porter described was when he got pushed by 
another man into the gate located next to 
Kam's, and got his head stuck. In an effort to 
dislodge himself Porter continuously opened 
and shut the gate until it came off its hinges. 
Thankfully, he safely recovered his head, but 
the gate ended up in the street. 

Being a bar employee is not just about 
meeting wierd people and dislodging heads 
from tight spaces, though. He feels that "over- 
all, it's a great job." 

— Story by Amie Megginson 




-Marianne Mathe 



378 Graduates 




Tracy Genczo Highland 
Geoffrey Gentry Schaumburg 
Kimberly Gentry Sterling 
Jennifer Georgas Chicago 
Sheryl Geraci Chicago Ridge 
Trista Gerdes Moline 
Andrew Gerwitz Clifton Park, N.Y. 
Amy Gherna Georgetown 

Mark Giamalva Barrington 
Micheline Giannasi Wheaton 
Claude Gibson Chicago 
Carrie Gilbert Springfield 
Dawn Girardi Mount Prospect 
Paul Glaser Champaign 
Wibke Glass Champaign 
Brian Glassenberg Northbrook 

Jon Gochee Illinois City 
Patrick Godfrey Champaign 
Laura Godwin Oak Lawn 
Stacey Goebel Hawthorn Woods 
Craig Goesel Algonquin 
Brady Goldsmith Anna 
Elina Golod Buffalo Grove 
Arturo Gonzalez Chicago 

David Goode Wheeling 
Michelle Goodman Schaumburg 
Sherri Goodman Highland Park 
Lisa Goodpaster Rantoul 
Bradley Goodsell Monton 
Elizabeth Gorski Champaign 
Patrick Gould Mount Caramel 
Heidi Grade Rockford 

Michael Graf Champaign 
Chris Graff Hanover Park 
Teresa Granacher Carlock 
Glen-Erik Granskog Libertyville 
Ladonna Grant Urbana 
Samuel Grant O' Fallon 
Kathleen Graves Bloomington 
Leanna Gray Decatur 

Tiffany Gray Bloomington, Ind. 
Bridget Greeley Western Springs 
Leslie Greene Champaign 
Jennifer Greenman Addison 
Cheryl Greenwalt Champaign 
David Greenwell Niantic 
Ryan Gregory Bloomington 
Kurt Greissinger Mundelein 

Kevin Grelecki Mount Prospect 
Andrea Griffin Elmhurst 
Christopher Griffin Lindenhurst 
Mathew Grismer Champaign 
Sara Grogman Chicago 
Stephen Groppel Godfrey 
Kimberly Grossmann Elk Grove 
Karen Grotto Wheaton 

Laura Groves Peoria 
John Grundke Champaign 
Beth Gschiel Elmhurst 
Sally Gschwendtner Pontiac 
Melody Guadalupe Champaign 
Renee Guenther Normal 
John Guerrera Champaign 
Elizabeth Guerrero Lasalle 



Genczo — Guerrero 379 



..... .... .... 

< . .. .. „ - • .■'.■■" 



W If 1 1. is sil 






art of the Group 



For Beckwith Hall, separation was a major 
obstacle. From its start about 30 years ago, 
Beckwith Hall has made many changes. When 
it originally Opened, Beckwith not only housed 
students, but also the doctors and nurses who 
cared for them. The place was not a residence 
hall, but a hospital. 

In the Fall of 1994, Brian Booton was 
brought in as the new director of the residence 
hall. With him was brought the responsibility 
to implement changes into the structure of 
Beckwith. 

Beckwith, located at the corner of Second 
and John Streets, housed 17 students with a 
wide range of disabilities including muscular 
dystrophy, cerebral palsy and hearing impair- 
ment. For Booton, one of his goals was to 
empower his residents to have confidence in 
themselves and their abilities. 

As of the Fall of 1994, Beckwith had only 
four live-in aids to help its students. For some 



of the residents, aids were a part of their 
everyday lives. "Students needed to have more 
control over their aids," Booton commented. 
Residents were now responsible for schedul- 
ing an aid when they needed one. "It is a big 
responsibility for the student," Booton added. 
They needed to make sure someone was 
around to help them when necessary. 

Another goal for Beckwith was for it to be 
"truly implemented in the University Residence 
Hall system. For being a part of the University 
Residence Halls on campus, Beckwith did not 
show any sign of it. Other university residence 
halls had programs for resident advisors to help 
them get acquainted with their upcoming job. 
Beckwith's resident advisors, up to this year, 
never had an opportunity to participate in the 
program. Booton hoped to hire resident advi- 
sors in time for the orientation program so that 
they may benefit from it. 

Booton also wanted Beckwith to get more 



One of the goals of Beckwith is to empower 
the residents to have confidence in them- 
selves and their abilities. 



involved in activities. He was working on 
getting a sister dorm for Beckwith. This would 
enable residents to get out and get involved 
with people from other places. 

Tim Gove, junior in CBA, felt that getting 
involved was a good idea. "This was a great 
place to live, but I did feel we were too 
segregated," Gove said. "It would be nice to get 
involved with other halls." 

Mike Quach, freshman in LAS, also had a 
positive opinion on the matter. "It was a good 
idea, but it would work the best if the other 
dorm was dedicated to helping," Quach stated. 

For Beckwith, the changes were going to be 
truly implemented in the Fall of 1995. Booton 
had a very positive attitude towards the reno- 
vations he would be making. Only time would 
tell how these changes would come about, but 
hopefully they would join the ranks of the 
other dorms on campus. 

— Story by Jennifer Arendarczyk 



380 Graduates 






Beckwith is located at the corner of Second 
and John Streets. It houses 17 students with 
a wide range of disabilities including mus- 
cular dystrophy, cerebral palsy and hearing 
impairment. 

A room at Beckman resembles a regular 
dorm room in a residence hall. A goal for 
Beckwith is for it to be truly implemented in 
the University Residence Hall system. 



Graduates 381 




\: i; 



earing it 'Live' 



With the college bars constantly being 
raided by Champaign police, students 
looked for an alternative way to spend 
Friday and Saturday nights - not to men- 
tion an occasional open weeknight. As the 
craving for music during the 1994-1995 
school year grew on campus, the bars to 
provide it became more popular to 
visit. Mabel's and The Blind Pig Co. fea- 
tured bands as a breakaway from the 
stereotypical dance beat music played at 
campus bars. The focus of the bands' 
music seemed to be more alternative 
but just as easy to have fun and dance to 
with friends. 

Various local bands, such as Free Range 
Chicken, Shellac, Ratskellar and Pavement, 
began the year's new wave of music. Free 
Range Chicken had previous exposure 
playing as the opening act for the Bludgers 
during the 1993-1994 school year. Band 



members performed by night, but by day 
they were U of I students, working at other 
jobs and attending classes. "It takes an 
organized, efficient schedule to fit every- 
thing in with teaching my classes," said 
Amos Tevelow, Speech Communications 
T.A. and the rhythm guitarist/lead singer 
for Free Range Chicken. 

Although Mabel's and The Blind Pig Co. 
featured these hot bands, getting into the 
clubs proved to be just as difficult as 
getting into campus bars such as CO. 
Daniel's, Cochrane's and Kam's. At The 
Blind Pig Co. as well as Mabel's, the legal 
admittance age was 19. "If someone wants 
to see a band badly enough, they're going 
to get in with whatever ID they can get a 
hold of," said Amanda Kuhlemeier, fresh- 
man in LAS. Even if students had a prob- 
lem getting into Mabel's and The Blind Pig 
Co,, they still had a chance to hear some 



hot music elsewhere on campus. 

At the Assembly Hall, Billy Joel played 
Oct. 28, 1994, with students dishing out 
$29-50 for his performance. Foellinger 
Auditorium featured Live and Weezer Nov. 
10 and Toad The Wet Sproket Nov. 5. 
Another big name to hit the U of I scene in 
1994 was Tori Amos. Amos played the 
Virginia Theater to a sold out crowd Sept. 
27. "I like both (Joel and Amos), but being 
a poor college student limits the ability to 
go to their concerts," said Julia Warner, 
sophomore in LAS. 

No matter what one's taste in music is - 
from dance to alternative - there is always 
a place around campus that will supply 
the atmosphere and the music. "I love the 
variety of music at bars, so I can always 
find some place to go and have fun with a 
group of people," said Kuhlemeier. 

— Story by Jennifer Williams 



Kristen Guilliams Normal 

Dana Gullaksen Clarendon Hills 

Earl Gunther Schaumburg 

Amy Gustafson Springfield 

Kristen Gustafson Downers Grove 

Jason Gustaveson Roselle 

Dana Haas Trenton 

Mark Haenle Bloomington 

Rudy Haerr Champaign 

Shara Haimes Highland Park 

Eric Hall Loda 

Stephanie Halstenberg Chapin 

Stephen Hames Palos Heights 

Teresa Hamill Naperville 

Susan Hamilton Vernon Hills 

Theodore Hampson Washington 

Amelia Hannus Champaign 

Michelle Hansen Lindenhurst 

Nicole Hansen Manlius 

Douglas Hansens Dewey 

Cary Harbison Champaign 

Karon Harden Wilmore, Ky. 

Kevin Harding Barrington 

Rebecca Haremza Itasca 

Jude Haberkorn Paws Park 

Christopher Hargaren Palos Park 

Jacqueline Harmon Carmi 

Evalina Harms Rockford 

Johanna Harms Champaign 

Karyn Harms Chicago 

Tiffany Harnetiaux Champaign 

Patricia Haro Chicago 




382 Graduates 





Teresa Haro Chicago 
Pamela Harper Savoy 
Matthew Harris Champaign 
Brooke Harryman Freeburg 
Deborah Hartford Glenview 
Scott Hartman St. Charles 
Susan Hartstock Eureka 
Daniel Hartweg Glen Ellyn 

Sarah Hartwig Urbana 
Kelly Harvey East Peoria 
Ty Hasselman Urbana 
Heather Hathaway Downers Grove 
Stephanie Hausen Northbroook 
Amanda Haverkamp Metropolis 
Tamara Hawkins Valmeyer 
Lisa Hawkinson Galesburg 

Trent Hayden Pittstield 
Jeffrey Haye Elk Grove Village 
Adam Hayek Urbana 
Leslie Hazelwood Kampsville 
Lori Hazer Joliet 
Stephen Heal Granger, Ind. 
Megan Healy Champaign 
Rachel Hearity Lemont 

Jeff Hebreard Downers Grove 
Scott Hecathorn Earville 
Rebecca Heckman Champaign 
Melinda Heeg Lemont 
Brian Heery Darien 
Sheila Heide Dekalb 
Aaron Hein Oak Brook 
Bryan Heiser Niles 

Kevin Heitz Chesapeake, Va. 
David Helfand Wheeling 
Katherine Helm Park Forest 
Jennifer Hendricks Manhattan 
Michael Heniff Tinley Park 
Jarrod Henshaw Harrisburg 
Christopher Herbert Urbana 
Karen Herman Glenview 

Douglas Hermann Peoria 
Michael Hermann McHenry 
Diana Hernandez Chicago 
Mona Hernandez Langley AFB, Va. 
Teresa Hernandez Bartlett 
Heather Herren East Peoria 
John-Charles Hesser Glenview 
Julie Hessman Muscatine, Iowa 

Daniel Hew Champaign 
Karen Heyen Medora 
Andy Hicks Gurnee 
Brian Hill Champaign 
Carrie Hill Hillsboro 
Christopher Hill Oak Park 
Janet Hill Westmont 
Lauren Hill Palatine 

Wendy Hill Champaign 
Eric Hiller Manito 
Angela Hillhouse Galesburg 
Jeff Hillman Tremont 
Troy Hillman Decatur 
Danica Hills Roscoe 
Eric Hilquist Park Ridge 
Michael Hinchey Wheaton 



Guilliams — Hinchey 383 



■ >i>> 



warn 




i 




fv 



H 



* 4 f AW/ *V 






- tf # — 




Kristina Hiney Morris 

Matthew Hinnen Eureka 

Patricia Hinrichs Dawson 

Josephine Hipona Chicago 

Jory Hirsch Glenview 

Stephanie Hiwtz Batavia 

Jennifer Hodel Skokie 

Daniel Hoekstra Champaign 

Mindy Hoffert Champaign 

David Hoffman Urbana 

Jennifer Hoffman Nashville 

Michelle Hoffman Buffalo Grove 

Robert Hoffman Overland Park, Kan. 

John Hoke Carbondale 

Janice Holba Frankfort 

Kristy Holcomb Bellville 

Lynn Holle Urbana 

Rebecca Hollis Urbana 

Carissa Holmes Machesney Park 

Jennifer Holz Urbana 

Erik I Ionian Naperville 

Kyle Hood Champaign 

Gerrit Hoogeweif Lansing 

Bryan Hoon Glen Ellyn 

Jason Hoos Arlington Heights 

Donna Hopkins St. Joseph 

Steven Hopp Algonquin 

Barbara Horwitz Glenview 

Dorinne Hoss Schaumburg 

Eric Hostert New Lenox 

Keith Hougas Naperville 

Kila House Chicago 

Gregory Houston Jacksonville, Fla. 

D'ann Hoyne Matteson 

Annie Hsiao Urbana 

John Hsieh Urbana 

Doreen Hsu Orland Park 

Monique Hsu Northbrook 

Karen Hu Champaign 

Boyao Huang Naperville 

Nicole Hubner Champaign 

Beverly Huckstadt Ingleside 

Robert Hueckstaedt Antioch 

Holly Hughes Grand Ridge 

Gregory Hull Rockford 

Anthony Hunter Makandu 

Howard Huntington Champaign 

Kimberly Hurley Urbana 

Amy Hurliman Champaign 

David Hurter Cincinnati, Ohio 

Barbara Husak Champaign 

Kristina Hustedt Clifton 

Holly Hutchason Urbana 

Matthew Hutchinson Newman 

Larry Huy Onarga 

Joanna Huyear Carlinville 

Ryan Hwang Bensenville 
Aerin Hyun Hinsdale 
Lisa Icewicz Champaign 
Kasumi Iida Anderson, Ind. 
Laura Ingratta Chicago 
Michelle Inman Roscoe 
Khushnaaz Irani Peoria 
Timothy Isaacs Sullivan 




386 Graduates 






t*> 




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iifcdiM 




114*1 




Stacey Isaacson Peoria 
Craig Isacson Hinsdale 
Barbara Iverson Lombard 
Carla Ivey Flossmoor 
Yogendra Jacala Bartlett 
Anne Jack Urbana 
Jennifer Jackson Woodstock 
Kimberly Jackson Urbana 

Leonard Jackson Chicago 
Marilyn Jackson Champaign 
Melle Jackson Oak Park 
Patrice Jackson Champaign 
Lorie Jacobs East Peoria 
Todd Jacobson Chicago 
Julie Jakala Oak Forest 
Annisa Jamil Bun- Ridge 

Ross Januszyk Urbana 
Robert Jazo Tinley Park 
Shirley Jean-Baptiste Dolton 
Viva Jeffrey Glen Ellyn 
Bammeke Jenkins Chicago 
Gena Jensen Gardner 
Steven Jensen Farmington, Mass. 
Steven Jent Louisville 

Aaron Johnson Champaign 
Andrea Johnson Rock Island 
Brian Johnson Oak Park 
Bruce Johnson Coal Valley 
Carl Johnson East Peoria 
Cotina Johnson Elgin 
Eric Johnson Bloomington 
Thomas Johnson Chicago 

Maura Johnston Chicago 
Derek Jokisch Carlinville 
Gretchen Jokisch Virginia 
Amy Jones Franklin, Tenn. 
Darrel Jones Urbana 
Ernila Jones Chicago 
Tiffanie Jones Waukegan 
Tracey Jonker Oak Forest 

Jessica Judge Oak Park 
Derek Justman Palatine 
Michelle Juzesyn Urbana 
Adrianna Kaczmarczyk Hoffman Estates 
Jacquelyn Kahn Lombard 
Aaron Kaka Champaign 
Meredith Kalla Schaumburg 
Amanda Kamin Champaign 

Michael Kamin East Greenwich. R.I. 
Julie Kaminski Urbana 
Theresa Kane Alton 
Rebecca Kanik Crystal Lake 
Denise Kaplan Libertyville 
Jennifer Karrson Lansing 
Brian Kaspar Urbana 
Thomas Kasinger Champaign 

Michelle Kassulat Mount Prospect 
Robyn Kaufman Champaign 
Marybeth Kauss Champaign 
Thomas Kazmienzak Frankfort 
Thomas Keck Pittsburg, Pa. 
Sarah Keefauver Ipava 
Eric Keeley Rock Island 
Tamra Keenan Jacksonville 



Hiney — Keenan 387 




eliving the Past 



It was the 1980s all over again. "Tainted 
Love" by Soft Cell was blasted over the 
speakers. Everywhere, people were sing- 
ing along as they moved about from one 
group of friends to another. 

No this was not a scene from some bad 
film. This is the scene at CO. Daniel's 
every Tuesday night. Time Warp Tuesdays 
were going strong as people packed in to 
listen to their favorite 80's tunes. 

Daniella Santoro, sophomore in Educa- 
tion, is a regular at Time Warp. "I go there 
almost every week. I like it because you 
could go there to just hang out and sing 
along with all of the songs," Santoro said. 

Julie Zachary, junior in Agriculture, also 
goes to Time Warp on a regular basis. "It 
is a great way to spend a Tuesday night," 
Zachary stated. 

What keeps her going back there all the 



time? "They have great drink specials and 
awesome music," Zachary said. She also 
said that, "It is always crowded with lots of 
my friends." 

Before 80's music became trendy, there 
was Time Warp Tuesday. Time Warp was 
started at CO. Daniel's in September of 1992 
and is sponsored by WPGU. The idea for 
Time Warp came from a bar in Bloomington 
where they played music form the '70's. 
Scott Struber, CO's disc jockey and WPGU 
staff member, and Chris Copeland, C.O.'s 
manager, came up with the idea of playing 
nothing but 80's music all night. Before 
anyone knew it, Time Warp became the 
most popular spot to be on a Tuesday night. 
"I guess the reason why Time Warp is so 
popular is because no one had ever tried 
anything that unusual with music before 
this. Our timing was good because it started 



before '80's music became so popular and it 
gave people something very different to do," 
Copeland said. 

In order to put together what is now 
one of the most popular places to be as far 
as the bar scene goes, the staff at C.O.'s 
had to dig through their basement to find 
old records and go out and buy old com- 
pact discs to find enough music to please 
its customers. 

Mandy Durkin, sophomore in LAS, also 
enjoyed going to Time Warp. "I loved being 
able to hang out at a place where the music 
I grew up with was played," Durkin said, "I 
could hear all my favorite songs." 

If reliving your childhood and singing 
along with cheesy music is appealing, 
Time Warp is the place to be. 

— Story by Jennifer Arendarczyk 
and Debbie Williams 




"ierney Smith, senior in LAS and a C.O.'s 
bartender, fills beer into a Time Warp cup for a 
customer. In order to see the birth of Time 
Warp, the staff at C.O.'s had to dig through their 
basement to find old records and go out and buy 
old compact discs to find enough music to 
please its customers. 

People line up on Daniel Street waiting to enter 
CO. Daniel's Time Warp Tuesday. Time Warp 
was started at CO. Daniel's in September of 
1992 and is sponsored by WPGU. 



i '.'actuates 





Jeff Keith St. Louis, Mo. 
Daniel Keller Quincy 
James Keller Chicago 
Shawna Kelley Champaign 
Briant Kelly Glendale Heights 
Britton Kelly Lake Forest 
Dan Kelly St. Charles 
Anne Kendeigh Westwood. Mass. 

Doug Kennebeck Glenview 
Joanne Kern Darien 
Megan Kerr Champaign 
Zubin Khambatta Orland Park 
David Kheradyar Skokie 
Arun Khosla Bloomingdale 
Susannah Kice Wheaton 
Karen Kieffer Mount Caramel 

Laura Kielar Addison 
Teri Kil Glenview 
Christine Kilis Lemont 
Mary Killian Streator 
Chong Kim Rantoul 
Danny Kim Des Plaines 
Steve Kim Naperville 
Melissa Kinder Park Ridge 

Cassandra King Orland Park 
Julie King Champaign 
Eric Kirby Urbana 
Justin Kirkland Champaign 
Kelly Kirkland Champaign 
Shannon Kirkpatrick East Peoria 
Andrea Kish Columbia 
Karen Klafeta Schiller Park 

Sandra Klapp Skokie 
Matthew Klaus St. Charles 
Karen Klebosits Palatine 
Kevin Klee Pana 
Dan Klein Collinsville 
Jaime Klein Great Neck. NY. 
Cynthia Klemm Springfield 
Kristine Klemm Glenview 

Kurt Klemm Champaign 
Frank Kletecka Rockford 
Michael Kloth Naperville 
Elissa Knopoff Mount Prospect 
Todd Knudson High Falls. NY. 
Brian Kobylinski Schaumburg 
Christopher Kodosky Woodridge 
Frank Kofron Darien 

Alisa Kohl Bloomingdale 
Stacie Kolodzinski Champaign 
Dave Konsoer Homewood 
Libby Kop Downers Grove 
Chad Korse Naperville 
Christine Korsgren Arlington Heights 
Thomas Kostal Lagrange Park 
Kostas Kostopoulos Addison 

Angela Kotsalieff Lockport 
Sharon Kowalewski Champaign 
Heidi Kozaritz Schawmburg 
Wendy Kozlowski Bolingbrook 
Thomas Kracun Schaumburg 
Adam Krauss Champaign 
Michelle Krebel Waterloo 
Lyn Kreloff Northfield 



Keith, J. — Kreloff 389 




Mark Krempski Downers Grove 

Rebecca Kresim Chrisman 

Brian Kroening Naperville 

Lisa Kruegger Philo 

Mark Krug Urbana 

Sheri Kugler Arlington Heights 

Leah Kuharik Wheaton 

Shirphone Kuo Penfield, NY. 

Gregory Kus Downers Grove 

Christopher Kutsor Pontiac 

Lisa Kvbasnicka Glen Ellyn 

Yenni Kwok Urbana 

Wendy Kwong Urbana 

Nicole Kyros Arlington Heights 

Robert Lacey Chicago 

Ronald Lacy Collinsville 

Meredith Laduke Champaign 

Robert Laib Urbana 

David Laird Champaign 

Daniel Lake Grover, Mo. 

Kimberly Lakin Murrayville 

Phuong Lam Barrington 

Amy Lamb Champaign 

Jerry Lamm Burrridge 

Steven Lamos Arlington Heights 

Christina Lamotte Arlington Heights 

Amy Lancaster Effingham 

Michael Landler Chicago 

Jeremiah Landry Arlington Heights 

Matthew Lang O'Fallon 

Lori Langston Champaign 

Ronald Lanz Homewood 

John Larson Saint Augustine 

Karen Larson South Elgin 

Rhonda Lasko Schaumburg 

Stacey Latch Effingham 

Sau Wai Lau Chicago 

Craig Laudeman Bloomington 

Laura Launer Champaign 

Andrew Lausch Joliet 

Kim Lauten Champaign 

Wing-Mei Lav Urbana 

Cari Laverty Chicago 

Peter Lavett Montero 

Michael Lavette Montero 

Michael Lawson Champaign 

John Layne Wilton, Conn. 

Brad Lazzari Mokena 

Craig Leavell Champaign 

Jason Leavitt Palatine 

Laura Lechowicz Champaign 

David Lee Tremont 

Eunsuk Lee Chicago 

Hojoun Lee Oak Park 

Jooeun Lee Park Ridge 

King Yee Lee Urbana 

Michelle Lee Champaign 

Payton Lee Joliet 

Patricia Lee Chicago 

Peter Lee Urbana 

Peter Lee Niles 

Samantha Lee Urbana 

Seong-Kook Lee Rockford 

Seonghi Lee Savoy 



UJflfcl 




390 Graduates 





Tom Lee Northbrook 
Sean Leeders Elmwood Park 
Lloyd Lees Chicago 
Travis Leighton Champaign 
Heather Leinbach Libertyville 
Debra Lemke Elk Grove Village 
Katherine Lemke Grouplake 
Albert Lenkaitis St. Charles 

Corazon Leon Rantoul 
Annmarie Leonarduzzi Chicago 
Adrienne Leong Chicago 
Marc Levenson Richton Park 
Jami Levin Highland Park 
Noah Levin Champaign 
Gregory Levine Manchester, Mo. 
Kimberly Levy Riverwoods 

Christopher Lewandowski Addison 
Julie Lewis Champaign 
Melissa Lezotte Champaign 
Mandy Li Chicago 
Caryn Libkin Champaign 
Michelle Lichtenwalter Manhattan 
Dave Lidy Wheeler 
Julie Liebling Wilmette 

Elizabeth Lin Chicago 
Kristin Lindgren Sycamore 
Brian Lindholm Champaign 
Michelle Link Morton 
Brian Linscott Schaumburg 
Nicole Lisk Champaign 
Ann Littell Urbana 
Brainard Llanes Lombard 



riends and Fun 



Those who are not familiar with the event 
may imagine one huge toga party, but for those 
who know about it will say something com- 
pletely different. Greek Reunion is held during 
the weekend after the Fourth of July every 
summer and is a popular event for greeks and 
non-greeks alike. Many think of it as a time to 
come back to campus to see friends and 
acquaintances that they have not been in 
contact with since shcool got out. It is also a 
great chance for alumni to return to their 
alma mater for a weekend filled with nothing 
but fun. 

Greek Reunion has been an annual summer 
event at U of I for as long as anyone who is still 
on campus can remember. No one really 
knows how Greek Reunion got started, but it 
has become somewhat of a tradition. 

On Friday and Saturday night, the block of 
Daniel Street between Wright and Sixth Streets 
is closed off and the two bars, Kam's and CO. 
Daniel's, host a block party aimed at the 



thousands of students back on campus. Not 
only did Kam's and C.O.'s attract a lot of the 
greeks that were visiting for the weekend, but 
the other bars on campus were also very 
crowded. People just went wherever they 
normally go during the school year. 

Although it is not exclusively greek, mem- 
bers of campus fraternities and sororities use 
the second weekend in July to come down to 
campus, socialize and drink. It is a great 
opportunity to blow off work and other sum- 
mer responsibilities and come back to campus 
to relax. 

"Daniel Street was so crowded," said An- 
gela Garritano, junior in LAS. "One of the radio 
stations came and did a live broadcast from the 
block, which was cool. I spent one of the 
nights just walking around the street; it was 
really hard to find anybody because it was so 
busy. The other night I went to apartment 
parties and saw a lot of my friends that I hadn't 
seen since May. It was great to see everyone, 



hang out at school and not have to worry about 
homework." 

One problem seen by many students re- 
turning to campus for the weekend is in 
finding a place to stay. Many ask friends who 
are already on campus if they can crash for the 
weekend, or some students may rent a hotel 
room if the money is available. For those 
students who stayed on campus all summer, 
finding a place to stay was not a problem, but 
having extra house guests may have been. 
Emily Downes, senior in ALS, said, "This year I 
was lucky not to have a house full of friends, 
but last year it got a little too crowded." 

"Greek Reunion is always a great time," 
said Mike Pietsch, senior in LAS. "You just 
can't beat socializing with a few thousand of 
your closest friends." Greek Reunion may 
sound like just an excuse to party, but to 
some it means seeing and catching up with 
long lost friends. 

— Story by Debbie Williams 



Krempski — Llanes 391 





i 



Thomas Loftus Champaign 

Sara Lomasz Champaign 

Brandon Long Urbana 

Monica Long Chicago 

Wai Ling Loo Champaign 

Arturo Lopez Joliet 

Christine Lopez Waukegan 

Jeanette Lopez Chicago 

James Lord Hinsdale 

Gail Losieczka Champaign 

Lisa Lotta Champaign 

Bradley Lovett Lisle 

Michael Lowery Elgin 

Nichole Lowery Urbana 

Colin Loweth Evanston 

Jennifer Luberda Lansing 

Kristen Lucius Champaign 

Melissa Ludviksen Addison 

John Lukas Berwyn 

Debra Lund Arlington Heights 

Daniel Lundine Rockford 

Jennifer Lung Urbana 

Jennifer Lunnemann Pinckneyville 

Amy Lurito Arlington Heights 

Craig Luther Batavia 

Brent Lux Champaign 

Jennifer Lymburner Kettering, Ohio 

Gregory Lynch Champaign 

Aveen MacEntee Palos Heights 

Dean MacBeth Westchester 

Juan MacHannaford Libertyville 

Daniel MacKenzie Champaign 




hat's Entertainment 



Bill Cosby, known as Dr. Heathcliff 
Huxtable by the current student body due 
to those Cosby Show reruns, visited the U 
of I over Dad's Day 1994, and overwhelmed 
Assembly Hall with fits of laughter. "It was 
a fun show to see with your parents be- 
cause he had such a fatherly perspective," 
said Danny Baltes, junior in LAS. 

Cosby's show was completely "ageless." 
His material enticed an audience of all 
generations. His facial expressions were 
ones familiar to the Fat Albert cohort of 
kids, yet he could jump into a stern and 
serious face as he portrayed himself as the 
father which the parents enjoyed. "It was 
awesome! I couldn't stop laughing," said 
Lupita Ortega, sophomore in CBA. "He 
talked about things that happen every day 
that we never take time to realize act- 
ually happen." 



It seemed he covered just about every- 
thing from dreaded elementary school ge- 
ometry to his daughter's college lifestyle 
and even a trip to the dentist's office. The 
students could put themselves into a place 
in his story just as well as their parents had 
their place in a given part. 

"It was great," said U of I Dad, Manuel 
Castillo. "I laughed so hard that I had tears 
rolling down my cheeks. Numerous times 
throughout the show I had to lean over to 
tap my daughter because he [Cosby] would 
say something that was exactly her or 
exactly me." 

On the flipside, young comedian Adam 
Sandler performed 1994's Welcome Back 
Students free comedy show on Sept. 18, 
also at Assembly Hall. Castillo, who also 
attended the Sandler show, stated, "In ten 
years, Adam Sandler will have even greater 



potential, like Cosby. But for now, I'm 
glad I was there - I felt twenty again." 

Another major difference between Cosby 
and Sandler is that Cosby was not found at 
a campustown bar playing pool after his 
show. Sandler's show seemed the break 
students needed after a full weekend of 
dads. "He was the best choice for the free 
show because he identifies with our genera- 
tion," said Angel Lopez, sophomore in LAS. 

"With this audience, he was able to 
expand his material to cover aspects of 
college life such as sex, bars and drinking 
in addition to our favorite Saturday Night 
Live characters," Lopez said. 

On the downside, Ortega stated, "I think 
Adam Sandler is overrated. He should quit 
comedy and go into music. He has a really 
great voice." 

— Story by Kristina Castillo 



394 Graduates 





Emma MacLaren Genoa 
Louise MacPherson Aurora 
Paula Madeck Elmwood Park 
Michael Maeder Romeoville 
Lori Maggio Metropolis 
Eric Maima Gillespie 
Lisa Maki Franklin Park 
David Malinger Chicago 

John Malito Normal 
Kristen Malone Evanston 
Shehnaz Mansuri Naperville 
Dana Mantell Buffalo Grove 
Christina Mantis Addison 
James Marchiori Rolling Meadows 
Monica Marcotte O'Fallon 
Rachel Mares Jenks, Okla. 

Lee Margolis Buffalo Grove 
Marlene Marozas Orland Park 
Christian Marquez Champaign 
Jennifer Marrese Glendale Heights 
Sara Marshack Riverwoods 
Crystal Marshall Chicago 
Brian Martello Tinley Park 
Anthony Martin Marengo 

John Martin Elgin 
Julie Martin Champaign 
Scott Martin Naperville 
Rebecca Martos Woodstock 
Christopher Marx Mount Carmel 
Sara Marx Pontiac 
Leanne Mason Urbana 
Michael Mason Quincy 

Audra Masten Arenzville 
Monica Matar Chicago 
Joyce Mathai Bourbonnais 
Yukie Matsuo Elk Grove Village 
Delia Mathew Addison 
Sarah Mathews Waterloo 
June Mattila Milan 
Kristine Matula Carol Stream 

Julie Mauritzson Urbana 
Karen May Chicago 
Teri May Champaign 
Joel McAllister Champaign 
Douglas McCaffrey Mundelein 
Jennifer McCaffrey Berwyn 
Jamie McCall Champaign 
Emmett McCarthy Champaign 

Laura McCarthy La Grange 
Kristine McClintock Naperville 
Scott McClung Arlington 
Joan McClure Mahomet 
Lori McConaha Champaign 
Jody McCormick Ava 
Evelyn McCoy Urbana 
Steven McCoy Decatur 

Vicki McCoy Banville 
Mariann McDaniel Machesney Park 
Lauren McDermott Glen Ellyn 
Heather McDonald Champaign 
Eric McEwen Prairie City 
Steven McFarlin Urbana 
Kathy McGowan Urbana 
Kevin Mclnerney Mokena 



Loftus — Mclnerny 395 



eekend Alternatives 



It's Friday or Saturday night and the only 
thing to do in Champaign Urbana is get drunk 
at the bars. If you believe this, then you have 
missed out on a variety of exciting, alcohol-free 
activities that are available across campus. 

For some U of I students, drinking at the 
bars is not something they enjoy. Esther 
Goldenberg, senior in LAS said, "I don't like 
the crowds at the bars and bars don't appeal 
to me when I'm sober." Goldenberg prefers 
going to see movies or attending Hockey or 
Basketball games. Many other, less known, 
sports have meets or matches on a regular 
basis that can be very exciting. 

Small get-togethers in either apartments or 
dorm rooms are also popular. These events 
usually involve a meal ranging from pot-luck to 
ordering pizza. Activities include cards, board 
games, and viewing rented films. 

For those who don't want to stay in, the 
Union offers many alternatives. Both bowl- 
ing and pool are located in the basement and 
can provide hours of fun at a minimal cost. 
Occasionally the Union features entertain- 
ment such as comedians or bands either in 
the Down Under or the new Patio. Special 
events include all-niters in which various 

Gerry Zeter, freshman in LAS and concession 
worker, receives money from Neil Huffman, a 
resident of Chicago, for snacks before a movie at 
the Co-Ed Cinemas. Huffman said he decided to 
see a movie because he did not want to deal with 
the crowds at the bars. 



activities occur throughout the building like 
a game show, Twister, and bands and come- 
dians to entertain participants. 

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts 
has at least one performance nightly and 
offers a wide range of possibilities from 
student run plays to world-famous orches- 
tras. Artists come from all walks of life and 
all fields of entertainment. Many of the 
shows are offered at a discount to students, 
making it very affordable to see a great 
variety of world class entertainment. 

Also on the subject of music, many talented 
jazz and steel drum bands can be heard at 
Treno's or the Blind Pig. Local Bands are often 
showcased at Mabel's. Although, some people 
consider these places bars, the live entertain- 
ment provides a different atmosphere and not 
everyone chooses to drink. 

One popular form of entertainment on cam- 
pus is Spicy Clamato, a student improv troupe, 
which performs at various campus locales on a 
fairly regular basis. With each performance, 
their following grows as their humor converts 
skeptical first time viewers. "They're incredibly 
funny and everything they do is just on the 
spot, which makes it all the funnier," saidjenna 



Deysher, junior in FAA. 

Many students enjoy conversation over a 
hot cup of coffee as opposed to a cold beer. 
Popular coffee places are often packed late into 
the evening. One place with a particularly 
unique ambiance is Etc. located in the United 
Methodist Church. It is volunteer run and offers 
inexpensive beverages and cookies amid a 
candlelit, mural covered room. Board games 
are available for amusement. 

Finally, for those who don't want to sit still, 
there is ice skating at the ice arena, which is free 
except for skate rental. One can play a variety 
of team and individual sports at IMPE as well. 
Walleyball, which is played on a racquetball 
court, is especially popular. In warmer weather, 
rollerblading or even just hanging out on the 
Quad is a popular activity. 

There are many other activities occurring 
every night all across the campus. Often, they 
can be discovered by looking in the newspa- 
per, spotting flyers or calling places such as the 
Union or Krannert for information about up- 
coming events. In any case, when you feel like ' 
taking a break from die bars, at least now you know 
uhat there is more to do than just sit at home. 

— Story by Monica Soltesz 




.raauares 





Alyssa Mclntire Moline 
Lisa McKee Marengo 
Matthew McKendrick Western Springs 
Mike McKenna Peoria 
Jodi McKeown Naperville 
Michael McKinney Olney 
Michelle McMullen Plainfield 
Christopher McNear Chicago 

Kimberly Meadors Springfield 
Timothy Meana Wayne 
Cheryl Meccia Lombard 
Kathleen Medder Godfrey 
Dario Medina Wilmette 
Lilian Medina Wilmette 
Ken Meinhart Wheeler 
Katherine Meisenheimer Walnut 

David Meissen Springfield 
Louis Melacon Fairfax. Va. 
Jeffrey Melinder Belleville 
Norma Mendez Chicago 
Juan Mendoza Urbana 
Steven Mennecke Wheaton 
Teodoro Mercado Carol Stream 
Laura Merkin Northbrook 

June Merryview Champaign 
Anthony Messana Orland Park 
Cherisse Messina Champaign 
Robert Messina Springfield 
Carol Messing Crystal Lake 
Su-Lin Meyer Chicago 
Eric Meyers Glenview 
Kim Meyers Marengo 

Anna Michaelson Champaign 
Mary Michal Niles 
Julie Michalczyk Des Plaines 
James Michel Dixon 
Michelle Miculinich Champaign 
Amy Mikel Northfield 
Christine Mikel Northfield 
James Mikoda St Charles 

Colleen Milani Rockton 
Michael Miles Oak Forest 
David Miller Deerfield 
Jessica Miller Highland Park 
Kimberly Miller Cahokia 
Nathan Miller Forrest 
Nichole Miller Decatur 
Patty Miller Elburn 

Stephen Miller Geneseo 
Todd Miller Niantic 
Benny Mingo Champaign 
Karen Mini Sublette 
Jill Minnaert Geneseo 
Michelle Minos Carlyle 
Laura Mis Darien 
Ann Misener Aurora 

Laurie Misener Morris 
Caroline Misner Schaumburg 
Mark Mitchell Champaign 
Sandra Mitofsky Lincolnwood 
Angela Mitter Arlington Heights 
Akiko Miyamoto Atlanta, Ga. 
Melissa Mlynski Elmwood Park 
Jack Mocchi Rosemont 



Mclntire — Mocchi 397 



Jim Mocchi Rosemont 

Emily Moellring Fowler 

Kris Moll Savoy 

Gaitsiri Mongkolsmai Bloomington 

Eric Monico Palatine 

Marjorie Montez Woodridge 

Michael Moody Coal Valley 

Donald Moon Germantown, Tenn. 

Amy Moore Chicago 

Derek Moore Mahomet 

Jocelyn Moralde Chicago 

Jethandelyn Morales Oklahoma City, Okla. 

James Morganelli Riverside 

Timothy Moriarity East Moline 

David Morr Oakley 

Karen Morris Zionsville, Ind. 

Kathy Morris Zionsville, Ind. 

Rohert Morris Chicago 

Jannah Morse Danville 

Tanya Moschetti Coal City 

Elizaheth Moulds Wheaton 

Maureen Movrich Urbana 

John Mowry Freeport 

Mariam Mozayeni Champaign 

Robert Mozina Waukegan 

Joshua Mrozeu Elgin 

Dana Mueller Urbana 

Erin Mueller Madison, Conn. 

Jennifer Mueller Wilmette 

Melissa Mueller Glenview 

Aimee Mueth Champaign 

Jeffrey Mulcrone Champaign 

Tanya Muller Champaign 

Linda Mulrooney Palos Hills 

Lynn Munday Darien 

Cecilia Munoz Calumet City 

William Munoz Burr Ridge 

John Munro Glenview 

Kelly Munsell Chillicothe 

Nicole Murillo Tinley Park 

Brian Murnane Arlington Heights 

Ann Murphy Brighton 

Julie Murphy Champaign 

Megan Murphy Champaign 

Molly Murphy Champaign 

Robert Murphy Champaign 

Amy Murray Robinson 

Colleen Murray Urbana 

Kristin Musgrave Wilmette 

Chris Musselman Champaign 

Theodore Myatt Libertyville 

Beth Myers Eureka 

David Myers Urbana 

Jamey Myers Centralia 

Katherine Myers Murphysboro, Tenn. 

Melissa Myers Arlington Heights 

Simone Myers Evanston 

Semyoung Myung Champaign 

Scott Nacheman Jericho, NY. 

Ryan Nadick Northbrook 

Joseph Nagle Chicago 

Kevin Narimatsu Geneva 

Rajsekhar Natarajan Olney 

Antara Nath Rochester Hills, Mich. 




398 Graduates 





&&\ f*\ 





Joshua Nathan Highland Park 
Christopher Naunheimer Arlington Heights 
James Nee Champaign 
Shawn Neidorf Urbana 
Mitchell Neirrek Des Plaines 
Marion Nelson Oak Park 
Jennifer Nevius Pckin 
Christopher Newman Arlington Heights 

Robin Newman Buffalo Grove 
Maggy Ng Oak Brook 
Van Thy Ngo Arlington Heights 
Kimberly Nichols Bloomington 
Michael Nicholus River Grove 
Dana Nicke Moline 
Richard Nickel Champaign 
Neil Ninnam Westmont 

Audrey Nishimura Arlington Heights 
Keith Nix Olney 
Mauro Nobili Urbana 
Zachary Nold Champaign 
Jennifer Nolker Urbana 
Jodi Norbut Frankfort 
Jeffrey Norr Montgomery 
Meg Novotny Bloomington 

Sal Nudo Champaign 
Kimber-Leigh Nussbaum Prairie Village. Kan. 
Amy O'Brien Chicago 
Phyllis O'Connell Peoria 
Brian O'Connor Wataga 
Daniel O'Connor Aurora 
Gerald O'Connor Champaign 
Mary O'Connor Naperville 

Marie O'Connor Orland Park 
Amy O'Malley Orland Park 
Marie Oatis Urbana 
Meg Obenauf Lake Villa 
Geoff Oberg Champaign 
Amy Oberly Palatine 
Angie Obermeier Centralia 
Troy Oder Peoria 

James Oelschlager Marseilles 

Christi Ohlson Urbana 

Julie Ohlson Arlington Heights 

Thor Olberg Wheaton 

Heather Oldfield Vandalia 

Karin Oldfield Vandalia 

Joy Olkowski Arlington Heights 

Stephanie Olsansky Lincolnshire 

Nick Olesen Troy, Mich. 
Catherine Olson Decatur 
Kirsten Olson Champaign 
Melisa Olson West Chester, Pa. 
Kimberly Oostendorp Hinsdale 
Brian Opensky Champaign 
Lisa Opensky Glenview 
Lisa Orejudos Hanover Park 

Gretchen Orendorf Peoria 
Brian Ormaniec Lagrange 
Carla Ortega Glen Ellyn 
Michael Osborn Glenview 
Amy Osheff Niles 
Susan Osterbur Urbana 
Margaret Osterkamp Glenview 
Todd Ostrebur Ocden 



Mocchi — Ostrebur 399 






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aking a Difference 



The Counseling Center accepts applications 
eveiy fall for the Paraprofessional Program, 
which is a program for students who want to 
actively participate in programs and workshops 
that the Counseling Center sponsors throughout 
the year. Students usually apply at the beginning 
of their junior year and begin the program, 
granted they are accepted, that spring semester. 
It is listed as "Special Topics" in the timetable, and 
the first of a series of classes is Psychology 396. 

"The program was three semesters of psy- 
chology classes," said Shannon Riley, senior in 
LAS and paraprofessional. "Our first semester we 
learned how to become paraprofessionals. They 
taught listening skills, communication skills and 
helping skills. We also observed older parapro- 
fessionals [those undergraduates already in the 
program and active] doing workshops." 

One workshop the paraprofessionals di- 
rectly handled was the "Tuesdays at 7 p.m." 
series. The "Tuesdays at 7 p.m." program started 
in 1979 with paraprofessionals doing test anxiety 
workshops. From that, topics expanded into 
others such as weight control, self-confidence, 
women and body image and gay, lesbian and 
bisexual concerns done at random. 

"We decided then to have a special time each 
week for different workshops," said Dennis 
Vidoni, the coordinator of paraprofessional train- 
ing and services at the Counseling Center. "Thus 
came the 'Tuesdays at 7 p.m.' series. That was in 
about 1985. The series is based on issues and 
topics in the students' interests, what they wanted 
and needed. We usually have 24 workshops a 
year, and serve from 150 to 275 students in that 
year. This is a good opportunity to use peers to 
help students grow, develop and help their 



needs," Vidoni also stated. 

"I want to go into clinical psychology, and this 
is a good chance for hands-on experience," said 
Riley. Ninety percent of the paraprofessionals are 
psychology majors. 

"This program was recommended to me," 
said Francisco Castelan, senior in LAS, and a 
paraprofessional. "I want to go into counseling 
psychology. This program offered me a taste to 
see if that is the profession I really wanted. 
Administratively, it gave me an idea about how 
things are done as far as evaluations and dead- 
lines. I was able to practice the use of my 
listening skills." 

"I think this program did help people because 
it showed them that they weren't the only people 
who had these types of problems," Riley said. "It 
generated ideas that maybe they hadn't yet 
thought of to apply to their problem." Castelan 
agreed, and also stated, "They might not want to 
go to a professional, and just came to our 
'workshop to get basic information and resources 
to handle their dilemma." 

The workshops and other programs available 
to students through the Counseling Center are 
free, which could be another reason of their 
popularity. The paraprofessionals are well trained 
and educated in their field, and can help students in 
many of the same ways as a professional in the field. 

"Being students, we [the paraprofessionals] 
had a good idea of what people need," Castelan 
stated. "This year, we planned two mini series 
workshops, each being three Tuesdays.' The 
first dealt with procrastination, study skills and 
time management, and the second dealt with 
relationship problems. All workshop partici- 
pants fill out an evaluation, so we know what to 



plan [for the future]." 

Another such program sponsored by the 
Counseling Center is the Peer Support Program. 
Those paraprofessionals who acquired the best 
use of their skills are picked by Vidoni. "The 
program started about three years ago when a 
couple of paraprofessionals became interested 
in having peer counseling on a one-to-one 
basis," Vidoni stated. "Due to ethical ramifica- 
tions, we carved out four areas in which peer 
counselors will deal with: time management, 
stress management, sexual harassment and is- 
sues concerning students' academic problems.' 

The Peer Support Program mainly operated 
out of the Self Help Information Center in the 
Undergraduate Library. "The environment here 
isn't always acceptable for everyone that comes 
here," Castelan stated. "This is an outlet for 
students to learn what they can do to feel more 
comfortable. For example, some of my friends had 
problems feeling that the community didn't open 
up to them. And that is where I saw myself fitting in 
- to help them to better adjust to the community."' 

"We [paraprofessionals] were also allowed to 
do personal projects," Castelan said. "Some even 
publish pamphlets. One girl I know was really 
interested in sexual harassment, so she researched 
the topic and published her pamphlet. Students 
who went through the paraprofessional program 
not only enhance their own education at the U' 
of I, but also make that difference to so many 
other students. Big or small, problems of all sc >rts 
were welcomed. Undergraduates themselves 
had a hand in working together to decide topics 
and issues to benefit their peers so they everyone 
could fulfill their ultimate goal." 

— Story by Kristina Castillo 



Students receive information from para- 
professionals at a "Tuesdays at 7 p.m." workshop 
about procrastination, study skills and time 
management. Students are trained to serve as 
paraprofessionals as part of Psychology 396. 



402 Graduates 






Elizabeth Pagedas Brookfield, Wis. 
Trevor Pagliara Punta Gorda, Fla. 
Gil Palacio Urbana 
Jennifer Paletti Champaign 
Ryan Palm Cordova 
Anthony Paolella Arlington Heights 
Jeremy Paris Lansing 
Andrea Park Niles 

Cindy Park Waukegan 
Hokyung Park Rolling Meadows 
Julie Park Buffalo 
Seung Park Glenview 
Julie Parsell Jerseyville 
Charles Parsons Moline 
Tiffany Paschal Rockford 
Adam Paskiewicz Bolingbrook 

James Passarelli Elmwood Park 
Les Pataky Buffalo Grove 
Alka Patel Wadsworth 
Manisha Patel Glendale Heights 
Mehul Patel Champaign 
Jeanette Patterson Joliet 
Jennifer Patterson Farmington 
Jill Patterson Joliet 

Julie Patterson Champaign 
Chas Patton Urbana 
Ontisar Patton Chicago 
Jennifer Patzman Batavia 
Stephanie Paul Naperville 
Tammy Paulien Wood Dale 
Sharon Pauza Mahomet 
Susan Pavlon Glen Carbon 

Annette Pavone Carol Stream 
Jeffrey Pawlak Romeoville 
Suzanne Pawlicki Schaumburg 
Jena Payne Urbana 
Gina Payton Rock Island 
Nicole Pconka Rosemont 
Mariya Pearl Waukeqau 
Steven Pearlman Northbrook 

Alice Pearson Galena 
Kathryn Peck Urbana 
Giacomo Pecoraro Springfield 
Cathryn Peldiak Palatine 
Kristin Pelletier New Lenox 
Rachel Pelta Northbrook 
Rob Penington Meredosia 
Kurt Penn Glen Ellyn 

Jason Peragine Pompano Beach, Fla. 
Gina Perino Peoria 
Julie Periu Joliet 
Ann Persico New Lenox 
Julie Pesce Chicago 
Christopher Peter Champaign 
Cory Peter Champaign 
Suzanne Peterson Champaign 

Rebecca Petrinos Elwood 
Mary Petrucelli Mount Prospect 
Amy Petry Duquoin 
Jennifer Pettinger Glenview 
Tamera Pettit Elmwood 
Kathleen Petty Pittsfield 
Chuong Pham Chicago 
Cassie Phillips Benton 



Pagedas — Phillips 403 






; .... .... .. 




Jennifer Phillips Urbana 

Timothy Phillis Urbana 

Marybeth Phipps Tuscola 

Heath Pickerill Raymond 

Jennifer Pierhal Champaign 

Karla Pietrzyk Tinley Park 

Amy Pilewski Champaign 

Barbara Pilolla River Forest 

Marianne Pipitone Naperville 

Stephen Pitsch Urbana 

Deborah Plager Highland Park 

Sharon Plattner Glenview 

Todd Pleune Hartsville, S.C. 

Lisa Plopys Champaign 

Todd Plotner Philo 

Michael Podemski Geneva 

Violet Pogorzelski Elmhurst 

Jill Pokusa Crestwood 

James Polites Urbana 

Christopher Ponds Country Club Hills 

Andrea Pope Pekin 

Anna Porcaro Dyer, Ind. 

Juli-Ann Poremba Champaign 

Eric Port Big Rock 

Chiquita Potts Danville 

Rebecca Potts Dahinda 

David Powell Winchester 

Yolanda Powell Chicago 

Jack Powitz Arlington Heights 

Jodi Prahl Buffalo 

Penelope Prather Centralia 

Andrew Prechtel Darien 





lavors of the world 



During this week of cultural festivities, the 
Illini Union Board fifst served an appetizing line- 
up of internationally renown films such as "Fare- 
well, My Concubine," an export from China, 
"Strictly Ballroom," a representative from Austra- 
lia, "Cinema Paradiso," a gift from Italy and "Like 
Water for Chocolate," a Spanish refugee. 

The first course of movie fare extended from 
Monday, Nov. 7 through Thursday, Nov. 10, with 
one film delicacy presented each evening. The 
main course of finger-licking ethnic entrees and 
cultural exhibitions spanned from noon to 5 p.m. 
on Saturday, Nov. 12. Finally, a visual and 
auditory dessert of cultural song and dance 
performance capped off the event's end at 8 p.m. 
Saturday evening. 

Altogether, the individual events made up a 
filling full-course meal of exotic flavors, digested 
over a week-long feast known as International 
Festival. Billed as "a week long celebration of 
international cultures," I-Fest is a U of I tradition 
more than twenty years running. Some staples 
include an abundant variety of multicultural 
food, exhibits, workshops and performances. 

"It's one of the biggest events that gets the 



most number of groups," said RajeshriPatel, Illini 
Union Board Cultural Events Coordinator and 
senior in LAS. "It gives each group an opportu- 
nity to display what's important about their 
culture. They get to introduce their culture in a 
variety of ways." 

Not only does I-Fest draw a variety of cultures, 
but it also attracts a range in ages amongst the 
cultural participants. "International Fest is a way 
for undergraduates to get both graduates and 
undergraduates here," Patel said. "It's a time that 
graduate students feel that they can get out and 
do more things." 

This year's I-Fest boasted an especially large 
turnout at its various events. Roaming the ex- 
panse of the Illini rooms at the Illini Union during 
Saturday's Cultural Exhibition/Food Fest, at- 
tendees could taste several versions of baklava 
similar to the "original" served at the Greek 
booth. They could also find out how they could 
actually visit such remote places on the globe, 
like Uganda, by visiting the Peace Corps booth. 

"Every year, International Fest gets stronger 
and stronger," said Melsie Mina, senior in LAS 
and an I-Fest committee member. "Each year, 



people become more aware of people of othei 
cultures who are studying on this campus. Ever 
though you may not see them often, they have 
traditions that need to be seen." 

The Baha'i religious group also manned a 
booth at the cultural exhibition. The Interna- 
tional Fest exemplified the belief in "unity and 
diversity" which the Baha'i members share. "The 
Baha'i faith focuses on viewing the whole world 
as a celebration of international cultures," said 
Zivar Baker, junior in Agriculture. 

I-Fest was capped off Saturday evening 
with cultural performances held at Foellinger 
Auditorium. These performances included a 
classical Egyptian Cabaret and Arabian dances. 
Mexican "polkas" and Indonesian masked 
dances. The night ended when a Middle- 
Eastern band's arabesque musical performance 
invited a belly-dancing audience onto the 
stage. Finally, the attendees were no longer 
just passively taking part in the message of 
worldwide community involvement at the In- 
ternational Festival. They were taking a part in 
the global stage of life. 

— Story By Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 



404 Graduates 




Allen Prell Hinsdale 
Susan Presser Edelstein 
Anne Pretty Metamora 
Kristie Priester Barrington 
Yani Provines Champaign 
Vanessa Puchalski Lombard 
Monisha Pujari Mendham, N.J. 
Timothy Puszkiewicz Monticello 

Jason Quigley Bourbonnais 
Cristina Quillin Willowbrook 
James Quinn Glen Ellyn 
Gloria Quinones Chicago 
Carla Radecki Barrington 
Eric Radke Highland Park 
Amy Radosevich Peoria 
Matthew Radvansky Oak Park 

Naila Rafiq Wood Dale 
Jandy Rahn Naperville 
Jeanette Rahn Naperville 
Kristen Rakoski Joliet 
Lisa Ramirez Lynwood 
Priya Rangaswamy Urbana 
Nancy Rankin Champaign 
Courtney Ranquist Champaign 

Vandana Rao Matteson 
Ryan Rassin Deerfield 
Heather Raymond Park Ridge 
Katherine Raymond Champaign 
Elizabeth Reason Joy 
Jennifer Richardson Shorewood 
Jeanne Recter Joliet 
Terrance Redd Chicago 

Tina Redd Champaign 

Cathy Reed Catlin 

Curtis Regulus South Holland 

Kathleen Reid Addison 

Paul Reidy Chicago 

Trent Reierson Lexington 

Julie Reiher Cary 

Jennifer Reitman San Diego, Calif. 

Ryan Renken Nashville 
Wendy Reyes Woodstock 
Stephen Reynolds Palatine 
Elizabeth Rhine Decatur 
Melissa Rhoades Chicago 
Debbie Rich Loami 
Kelley Rich Champaign 
Matthew Rich Robinson 

Lloyd Richards Dolton 
Penny Richards River Forest 
Elaine Richardson Barlett 
Loren Richie Loami 
Wendy Richno Springfield 
Steven Rickenbrode Melrose Park 
Shannon Rider Harrisburg 
Denise Rieger Urbana 

Joel Riemer Hinsdale 
Shannon Riley Belleville 
Ann Rimovsky Urbana 
Andrew Riniker Galena 
Gregory Rippon Zelionople, Pa. 
Marlene Rivera Fairview Heights 
David Roberts North Haven, Conn. 
Craig Robertson Champaign 



Phillips, J. — Robertson 405 



Marcy Robinson New Lenox 

Kathleen Roche Park Ridge 

Candice Rockel Burlington, Iowa 

Heather Rodriguez Aurora 

Jennifer Roehrig Fox River Grove 

Eugene Rogers South Boston, Va. 

Jennifer Rogers Champaign 

Neal Rogers Kansas City, Mo. 

Joanna Rolfs Champaign 

Stephanie Roney Decatur 

Brett Rootberg Glenview 

Melisa Rosado Bloomington 

Melanie Rose Highland 

Steven Rose Champaign 

Lorie Rosenbaum Arlington Heights 

Gabriel Rosenberg Chicago 

Howard Rosenburg Skokie 

Robyn Rosenkopf Wayside N.J. 

Tammy Rosentreter Carlinville 

Raul Rosiles Waukegan 

Cary Rosko Countryside 

Jason Ross Freeport 

Jeremy Ross Tuscola 

Rachel Ross Lockport 

Nicole Rosseter Champaign 

Justin Roth Springfield 

Ryan Roth Edwardsville 

Sara Rowden Decatur 

Christopher Rowe Flossmoor 

Emilie Roy Bloomington 

David Rozanas Rockford 

Lauren Rubendall Winnetka 

Lorianne Rubino Burbank 

Paula Rucci Oak Brook 

Stephen Ruff Chicago 

Jason Ruge Peoria 

Monique Ruiz Orland Park 

Charles Rummel Westchester 

Kevin Ruppel Oakford 

Melinda Rusell Myrtle Beach, S.C. 

Katrina Rushing Bishop Hill 

Amy Russell Wilmette 

Christine Rutledge Champaign 

Amy Ryan Urbana 

Lorien Ryan Champaign 

Judith Ryner Rock Island 

Sharifah S-A-Hassan Malaysia 

Aaron Saak Chester 

Gina Saenz Gurnee 

Laurie Sagan Des Plains 

Somali Saha Lake Villa 

Theresa Sain Urbana 

Arnie Sair Lincolnwood 

Eileen Salazar Barrington 

Stephanie Salinas Urbana 

Laura Sallman Libertyville 

Brian Sambor Palos Heights 

George Sanabria Champaign 

Frederick Sant Elgin 

Margaret Santiago Orland Park 

Sybil Santos Urbana 

Stephen Saunders Joliet 

Richard Scarlett Danville 

Shannon Schaab Oak Park 







406 Graduates 





Susanne Scharl Arlington Heights 
Stephen Schemerhorn Lawrenceville 
Jennifer Scherer Columbia 
Lani Schieber Morton 
Sarah Schilling Lake Forest 
Mylynda Schlesinger Urbana 
Sheila Schlipf Gridley 
Pamela Schlueter Belleville 

Ronda Schmalz Palatine 
Ellen Schmeink Carlyle 
Eric Schmidt Cicero 
Karen Schmidt Okawville 
Kimberly Schmidt Mahomet 
Brad Schmitt Chesterfield, Mo. 
Jennifer Schmitt Aurora 
Tanya Schnabel Lindenhurst 

Jennifer Schoeffmann Mount Prospect 
Matthew Schrimpf Alton 
Doug Schuberth Park Ridge 
Kerri Schultz Buffalo Grove 
Jason Schumaker Barrington 
Jay Schwartz Urbana 
Jennifer Schwartz Palatine 
Ramona Schwartz Wheeling 

Jennifer Schweitzer South Elgin 
Eleanor Seaton Chicago 
Julie Sebastian Park Ridge 
Jeannine Seehawer Rockford 
Jennifer Seeley Carol Stream 
Stephen Sehy Teutopolis 
Brian Seifert Hanover 
Amy Seiler Champaign 

Linda Seiler Libertyville 
Douglas Seitzinger Champaign 
Bradley Sepp Urbana 
Wendy Seuring Rockford 
Chris Shackelford Naperville 
Kalpesh Shah Hanover Park 
Mona Shah Champaign 
Meredith Shaheen Peoria 

Miraj Shariff Hanover Park 
Joli Shaw Taylorville 
Paul Shaya Peoria 
Catherine Sheehy Elgin 
Michael Shelby Pontiac 
Deborah Shepard Urbana 
Tara Sherk Downingtown, Pa. 
Boris Sherman Morton Grove 

Patrick Sherman Mount Prospect 
Amit Sheth Vernon Hills 
Sameeta Sheth Geneva 
Jae Shin Urbana 
Stephanie Short Norris City 
Daniel Siblik Naperville 
Andrea Sica Elmwood Park 
Douglas Sidle Morton 

David Sieh Wheaton 
Christopher Sill Champaign 
Rosa Silva Flossmoor 
Donald Simmons Chicago 
Jennifer Simmons Aurora 
Krista Simmons Carol Stream 
Daniel Simms Urbana 
Bryan Simon Chicago 



Robinson — Simon 407 



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I 



Delinda Simon Urbana 

Stephanie Simon Morton Grove 

Krista Simons Quincy 

Denise Sims Chicago 

Thomas Sinak Champaign 

Carol Sipe Champaign 

David Skelly Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jeffrey Skinner Roscoe 

Julie Skodol Wheaton 

Dina Slomski Chicago 

Stephanie Slonski Des Plaines 

Kathy Smetana West Dundee 

Andrea Smith Lawrenceville 

Brian Smith Decatur 

Dwayne Smith Champaign 

Kenneth Smith Chicago 

Marshall Smith Rossville 

Melissa Smith Palatine 

Pamela Smith Harvey 

Sarah Smith Freeport 

Stephanie Smith Decatur 

Stephen Smith Peoria 

Tanesha Smith Hillside 

Tina Smith Champaign 

Julie Smull Freeport 

Susan Smutny Champaign 

Sean Smyth Urbana 

Simone Snipe Champaign 

John Snow Champaign 

David Snyder Champaign 

Emily Woemmel Derby, Kan. 

Monica Soltesz Chicago 

Scott Soltys Fairview Heights 

Kimberly Somerville Elgin 

Kaarin Soot Winnetka 

Bounsanong Sopha Elgin 

Heath Sorenson Rockford 

Keith Sorenson Streamwood 

Chris Sosnowski Lindenhrust 

Katherine Sours Champaign 

Kari Southerland Indian Head Park 

John Spangler Urbana 

Dina Spataro Chicago 

Jennifer Speaker Palos Heights 

Christine Speakman Frankfort 

Kimberly Speckmann Deerfield 

Kimberly Spiekermann Peoria 

Michelle Spindler Robinson 

Karen Sporny Champaign 

Todd Sprague Clinton 

Timothy Sproul Palatine 

Yolanda St.Clair Chicago 

Mike St.Martin Libertyville 

Ronald Stack Plainfield 

Michael Staffeldt Naperville 

Sherry Staggs Springfield 

Kimberly Stake Freeport 

Holly Stang Burbank 

Anthony Stanich Bolingbrook 

Kristin Stanton Sandwich 

Julie Staraitis Naperville 

Starr Cirks Minonk 

Tammy Starr Chicago 

Dana Stasiak Tinley Park 




410 Graduates 




Emily Statland Urbana 
Scott Stavish Skokie 
Jeffrey Stearnes Champaign 
Clint Stearns Makanda 
Sandra Steckel Jersey vi lie 
Jennifer Steffgen Champaign 
Rachel Steiner Champaign 
Stephen Steinhaus Addison 

Cheri Stennett South Barrington 
Kristen Stephansen Arlington Heights 
Darxavia Stephens Chicago 
Mary Stepping Pana 
A. J. Stetina Urbana 
Michael Stevens Chicago 
Kirsten Stewart Cary 
Nathania Stewart Bolingbrook 

Sarah Stewart Anchor 
Michelle Stinner Normal 
David Stinton Itasca 
Rhonda Stoecklin Urbana 
James Stolfi Chicago 
Amy Stolpa DesPlaines 
Kevin Stone Wheeling 
Matthew Stone Sullivan 

Michelle Stone Libertyville 
Jonathan Strackman Champaign 
Julie Strandberg Western Springs 
Tim Straub Staunton 
Mark Streidel Batavia 
Kathryn Strohman Rockford 
Mark Struznik Butte. Mont. 
Michael Stubbe Dakota 

Anita Stubbs Urbana 
Staci Stuedle Quincy 
Cara Stummer Chicago 
Suzanne Sturgell Arlington Heights 
Dan Stuzin Champaign 
Donna Styrczula Burbank 
Kenneth Su Downers Grove 
Meridith Suancarek Homewood 



Michael Suddduth Belleville 
Beth Suedmeyer Hoyleton 
Kristen Sugent Rolling Meadows 
Michelle Sulgit Naperville 
Christopher Sulkson Champaign 
David Sullivan Naperville 
Heather Sullivan Champaign 
Laura Sullivan Orland Park 

Megan Sullivan Orland Park 
Craig Summers Duquoin 
Julia Summers Savoy 
Richard Sun Chicago 
Manoshree Sundaram Palatine 
Scott Sundquist Ingleside 
Susan Sutor Galesburg 
Christopher Svetlik Schaumburg 

Linda Svoboda Champaign 
Michelle Swanson Polo 
James Swartz Decatur 
Michael Sweeney Park Ridge 
Colleen Sweitzer Lombard 
Kristen Swigart Champaign 
Jennifer Swinehart Sterling 
Gretchen Swingley Palatine 



Simon — Swingley 411 




ny last regrets? 

bu're a senior. You've done it all. Or have you? Everyone 
still has a few last regrets, a few last wishes, a few things 
they really wish they had done. Such as... 



Sleeping on the Quad 

Drinking the Wall at O'Malley's 

Trying out for a sports team 

Doing my TA 

Getting season tickets for anything 

Trying out for the Marching Illini 

Being on the Forensic Team 

Taking my clothes off when a girl asked me to 

Going on enough road trips to other campuses 

Getting a 5.0 

Seeing enough live entertainment 

Meeting more people 

Having sex on the Quad 

Going to Bradley's 

Playing football at Memorial Stadium with friends 

Visiting Big Daddy's again 

There were these girls ... I never should have said no 

Going to a basketball game 

Doing more things that look good an a resume 

Joining the Home Brewers Club 

Climbing the lights at Memorial Stadium 

Going to Versailles 

Being voted King 

Trying a double vanilla cappuccino at Espresso 

Seeing more local bands 

Having enough time to party and go to the bars 

Going to a hockey game 

Joining the SGA 

Having sex on the Alma Mater 



412 Graduates 





Marni Svvitkin Columbus. Ohio 
Lon Taff Champaign 
Bruce Takasaki Chatsworth 
Dariush Takhtehchian Champaign 
Jennifer Tang North Potomac. Md. 
Wayne Tanner Speer 
Jennifer Tanzer Urbana 
Eric Tarasievich Arlington Heights 

Angela Taylor Marion 
Jamee Taylor West Chicago 
Laura Taylor Evanston 
Diana Tebockhorst Naperville 
Samuel Teo Morton 
Lisa Terrell Bourbonnais 
Martha Terrell Springfield 
Abigail Tesdall Morris 

Jeena Tharp Yale 
Jill Theobald Buffalo 
Geoffrey Thomas Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Julienne Thomas Chicago 
William Thomas Meamora 
Amanda Thompson Oak Brook 
Laurel Thompson Plainfield 
James Thormeyer Champaign 

Mark Tice Petersburg 
Chong Tieng Chicago 
Anna Tilley Oak Brook 
Joesph Tillman Assumption 
Brad Tillock Sparta 
Amy Tilly Champaign 
Derek Timmermann Breese 
Roberto Tirona Champaign 

Jason Tjaden Urbana 
Katherine Tobin Deerfield 
Kekin Tobin Monticello 
Chris Todd Woodstock 
Milorad Todorovich Libertyville 
Dana Tolomeo Melrose Park 
Nicole Tomasello Gurnee 
John Tomczak Champaign 

Julie Tomhave Pittsfield 
Amy Tomlinson Carrnel, Ind. 
Konstanty Topolski Rolling 
Jason Torf Northbrook 
Kristine Towner Geneseo 
Corey Townsend Stockton 
Sarah Townsley Countryside 
Mike Trakselis Aurora 

Brad Trankina Rithian 
Jennifer Trapp Crete 
Stacy Travis Urbana 
Michael Trias Arlington Heights 
Tricia Trimpe Havana 
Darin Trobaugh Mascoutah 
Cheryl Trojan Crystal Lake 
Brandy Truckenbrod Sublette 

Jeffrey True Cherry Valley 
Tung Truong Arlington Heights 
Tara Tschetter Batavia 
Daniel Tschniak Chicago 
Elaine Tse Libertyville 
Kai Tse Chicago 
Tony Tseng Dunlap 
Min-Hsin Tsou Urbana 



Switkin — Tsou 413 



0HOKft 




Michael Tsugawa Darien 

Naotaka Tsuge Champaign 

Jill Tucker Chicago 

Tyra Tunelius North Aurora 

Quentin Turner Chicago 

Joanna Tweedy Murphysboro 

Marci Uihlein Champaign 

Brygg Ullmer Palo Alto. Calif. 

Jim Underwood Rodelle 

John Urbaniec Lombard 

Veronica Vaglienty Chicago 

Jason Vahling Effingham 

Noreen Vaid Des Plaines 

Tracy Valentine Champaign 

Victor Valerga Naperville 

Marisa Valerio Naperville 

Annika Van Gelder East Dubuque 

Brian Van Zante Wheaton 

Bruce Van Zante Wheaton 

Erik Vanburen Urbana 

Ryan Vance Buckley 

Gregory Vandigo Apple River 

Wendy Vanwazer Carpentersville 

Gregory Vanwiggeren Loda 

Mark Varner Galve 

Vladan Vasiljevic Libertyville 

Anisa Vasquez Tinley Park 

Miguel Vega Chicago 

Markus Veile Lake Bluff 

Vernice Veranga Chicago 

Joanne Veremis Des Plaines 

Carole Vilchis Glenview 

Michael Villalobos Chicago 

Juliet Villanueva Urbana 

Venere Vitale Champaign 

Tracy Vizza Evergreen Park 

Kenneth Vogt Champaign 

Lavarro Waddell Champaign 

Nancy Waddington Rockford 

Sabir Wadhwani Champaign 

Amy Wagner Aurora 

Lance Wahl Sterling 

Sheila Wojciechowski Urbana 

Travis Walk Neoga 

Brett Walker Morton 

Cindy Walker Atlanta. Ga. 

Jennifer Walker Montgomery 

Jenny Wallace Champaign 

Katherine Wallaert Moline 

David Walter Deerfield 

Karen Walters Charleston 

Kristin Walz Aurora 

Daniel Wang Chicago 

Jennifer Wang Urbana 

Julie Ward Cary 

Claudia Warren Chicago 

Alicia Washington Peoria 

Stephen Wassman Waterman 

Laura Watkinson Franklin Park 

Neeley Weaver Elmhurst 

Susan Weaver North Aurora 

Robert Webb Maywood 

Lanee Webel Cropsey 

Nicole Webel Roselle 




414 Graduates 





Carol Weber Crestwood 
Lisa Weier Champaign 
Jennifer Weil Highland 
Bryan Weisberg Smithtown, N.Y. 
Zinnia Weise River Forest 
Gina Welch Chicago Ridge 
Joan Welge Chester 
Jessica Wells Champaign 

Sheila Wenger Fairbury 
Linnea Wentzel Downers Grove 
Christine Werlein Glenview 
Karen Werstein Washington 
Steve West Norris City 
Julie Wetzel Waterloo 
Eric While Peoria 
Michael Whitchurch Urbana 

Lois White Chicago 
Tim White Paxton 
Susan Whitwell Sycamore 
Susan Wiatr Park Ridge 
Jennifer Wickenkamp Glen Ellyn 
Jeffrey Wickman Justice 
Jeffrey Wiegers Collinsville 
Jason Wiesbrock Champaign 

Gregg Wiktor Chicago 
Kevin Wiland Huntington, N.Y. 
John Wilcox New Berlin 
Phill Wilkey Piper City 
Michael Wilkinson Edwardsville 
Jeffrey Will Beulah, N.D. 
Amy Willets Sylvania, Ohio 
David Willey Richton Park 



• 



MmElectromcPkmeers 



The^U of I has gained a worldwide repu- 
ation within the last two years as the birth- 
place and home of Mosaic. Mosaic is a 
:omputer program that has captured 
he fancy of the general public because it 
nakes the Internet easily accessible, before 
4osaic, people used to think of the Internet 
is an arcane place where hackers broke 
nto government computers and talked in 
:omputerese. 

The Internet inhabitants on the other hand, 
hought of it as the electronic frontier. To them, 
t was the future, even if it was a bit rough on 
he edges. Mosaic changed that, bringing the 
uture to the present by polishing off those 
ough edges and by making it easy even for 
omputer illiterates to see the beauty, breadth 
nd scope of the Internet through a visual 
iterface. Mosaic caught on quickly and made 
ational news. Suddenly everybody wanted to 
e on the Internet. 

The Internet is more than Mosaic; it has been 
rowing, maturing and developing its own 



personality for many more years than Mosaic 
has been around. In addition, Mosaic is not the 
first contribution to the Internet by U of I 
people. Some of the software that made up the 
Internet was written by U of I programmers so 
long ago, "it seems almost mythological," said 
Dan Simms, senior in Engineering. 

"The first NetNews program that allowed 
people to communicate by posting to an 
international computer bulletin board sys- 
tem was actually a PLATO program called 
'Notes' that was rewritten for UNIX by the 
venerable Ray Essick," said Charley Kline, 
UIUC Network Architect. 

PLATO, though it is not part of the Internet, 
has also influenced a wide number of pro- 
grammers from the U of I, including a couple 
of UniHigh students who went on to write 
the highly successful Lotus Notes E-mail 
system based on their experiences with 
PLATO's Notes program. 

Another programmer whose programs in- 
fluenced the Internet is Steve Dorner, formerly 



of U of I's Computing Services Office (CSO). 
While at CSO, Dorner wrote the first few 
versions of "Eudora" and "Ph." Eudora is a 
highly successful E-mail program that makes E- 
mail extremely easy to use. Steve Dorner 
eventually left the LI of I for Qualcomm, Inc., 
which now writes and distributes new versions 
of Eudora. 

"Ph," the electronic PHone book, on the 
other hand, is now in the care of Paul Pomes, 
a CCSO Senior Research Programmer who said 
he had added improvements which have helped 
turn Ph into a de facto Internet standard for E- 
mail directories. 

Mosaic was not the first U of I contribution 
to the Internet, nor will it be the last. According 
to Peter Resnick, graduate student in Philoso- 
phy, Charley Kline and Eric Scouten, graduate 
assistant, are working on a program for voice 
communication over the Internet called "Ma- 
ven." Charley Kline did not say much about it 
except that he "doesn't toot his own horn." 

— Story by Patrick Gallot 



Tsugawa — Willey 415 







K--rf^y #?<■>'<■«&& 







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eadedfor Success 



It has been said that it is not just a man's 
world anymore. This may riot be true in 
every instance, but it is definitely true in the 
world of rugby. The women's rugby team 
started the season with a full veteran squad 
and the team members had their sights set on 
the collegiate championship from the start. 

Although the team started out with many 
of its key players injured, the Illinois women's 
rugby team worked hard and finished out 
the season with a second place trophy in 
the midwest. "Almost everyone out there 
was injured, but we all stood strong and 
played for each other," said Sue Whitwell, 
senior in FAA. 

Both club and collegiate play went ex- 
tremely well for the team. The players breezed 
through club play and soon went on to 
collegiate play. "We played a good funda- 



mental game against the Madison club," said 
Amy Stephen, senior in Engineering. "It 
really boosted our confidence and team 
unity as we headed to collegiates." 

Their collegiate season started out with a 
big victory over Illinois State. The score of 
that game was an incredible 39-5. Stacy 
Miller, senior in LAS, said, "We enjoy playing 
ISU every year because of our friendly ri- 
valry. Even though we have always won the 
game, afterwards we have a great party 
because our teams get along so well." 

Regular season play went on as the Illi- 
nois team went on to beat Loyola University 
35-0. At the collegiate championship tourna- 
ment, the Illini bypassed Eastern Illinois 
with a score of 32-0 in the first round of play. 
With this victory, they advanced to the sec- 
ond round of play to defeat Michigan by a 



score of 5-3. 

The championship round was to be played 
against Penn State. The Illini lost the game 
27-5, which left them with a second place 
title in the Midwest Union. Team captain 
Noreen Vaid, senior in CBA, said, "It was a 
very emotional weekend for all of us. East- 
ern always plays a physical game, but they 
were sloppy and not able to stop our scoring 
streak. Then it was on to our natural rivals, 
Michigan. We were a little disappointed at 
the loss, but Michigan deserved to win the 
game and we were happy with the second 
place title." 

The women's rugby team worked ex- 
tremely hard this season, and with a lot of 
experience and determination, they came 
out victorious. 

— Story by Debbie Williams 




Captain Noreen Vaid straight-arms an 
EIU player as she heads down the field 
in the Midwest Collegiate tournament. 
With a team full of veterans, the 
women's rugby team placed second in j 
the Midwest Union. 



418 Graduates 





Stacey Miller, a senior fullback, 
breaks a tackle against Loyola at 
Illini Meadows. The Illini beat 
Loyola 35-0. 

Senior center Jacy Schoen runs 
around a Loyola defender during 
a winning match at Illinois. 
Schoen is supported by outcenter 
Candice Kohlmeier. 



Graduates 419 






s^ms'M.;-;'?: 







,<r ■' 

% 

% 



Ginger Williams New Holland 

Melissa Williams Van Orin 

Michele Williams Bellwood 

Jennifer Williamson Wheeling 

Gregory Willis Carol Stream 

Julie Willis Hoffman Estates 

Amy Willson McHenry 

Lisa Willuweit Glen Ellyn 

Anne Wilseck Clarendon Hills 

Belinda Wilson Urbana 

Michelle Wilson Urbana 

Tracy Wilson Addison 

Kevin Wingo Champaign 

Margaret Wingstedt Lombard 

David Winkler Evanston 

Peter Winslow Sugar Grove 

John Winterhalder West Chicago 

Matthew Wise Champaign 

Nicole Witry Oak Forest 

Ronald Witte Naperville 

Jessica Wobbekind Wilmette 

Jennifer Wojciechowski Urbana 

Jennifer Wold New Lenox 

Michael Wolf Champaign 

Tracy Wolniewicz Crystal Lake 

Brett Wolters Quincy 

Barbara Wolz Brookfield 

Hakung Wong Mundelein 

Richard Wong Grayslake 

Sylvia Wong Dallas, Texas 

Zun-May Woo Billings, Mont. 

Larry Woodard Hickory Hills 

Larry Woodrum Springfield 

Van Woods Champaign 

Melissa Worden Glen Ellyn 

Deborah Worthington New Holland 

Jennifer Wozniak Downers Grove 

Christy Wright Champaign 

Nicole Wight Urbana 

Susan Wright Champaign 

Benny Wu Addison 

Brian Wuebbels Germantown 

Dawn Wunderle Mason City 

Damon Wurth Champaign 

Ruthie Wyman Normal 

Daniel Yairi Urbana 

Vanessa Yang Glenview 

Wenli Yang Urbana 

Man Ha Yau Champaign 

Man Yat Yau Urbana 

Sherie Yearton Wonder Lake 

Deborah Yelich Rosemont 

Raymond Yeung Chicago 

Lena Yoe Chicago 

A.J. Yolofsky Fair Lawn N.J. 

Young Yoo Des Plaines 

Linda Yoon Schereville, Ind. 

Seung-Hyan Yoon Harwood Heights 

Angelique Young Urbana 

Dan Young Cincinnati, Ohio 

Eric Yu Schaumburg 

Janet Yuan Chicago 

Jessica Yuan Champaign 

Jeffrey Yukins Champaign 




Graduates 





Joshua Yulish Potomac, Md. 
So-Yeon Yun Urbana 
Michelle Zatlin Glenview 
Amy Zbinden Lake In The Hills 
Martin Zeidman Norlhbrook 
Joseph Zell Melrose Park 
Jennifer Zemaitis Decatur 
Susan Zhao Chicago 

Nicole Ziegler Rocktord 
Thomas Zielke Little York 
Roger Zielke Little York 
Melissa Zigman Highland Park 
Matthew Zimmer Rockford 
Brett Zimmerman Winnebago 
Janice Zimmerman Winthrop Harbor 
Rick Zordani Carpentersville 

Charlie Zosel Hawthorn Woods 
Robert Zuber Assumption 
Karen Zumpano Rosemont 
Lance Zumwalt Champaign 
Laura Zurawski Urbana 
Shelby Zweig Urbana 
Jim Blue Chrisman 
Janeen Barone Darien 

Laura Bunting Naperville 
Paula Chojnacki Summit 
Rowdy Clagg Champaign 
Ann Dorr Chatham 
Melinda Elvidge Urbana 
Waymong Eng Chicago 
Sunhae Ha Chicago 
Daniel Hrad Champaign 

Larissa Ingram Chicago 
Selina Joya Oak Park 
Kristen Molnar Yorkville 
Shannon Murphy Grayslake 
Jeff Musur Urbana 
Laura Sikovski Lombard 
Robert Stanek Darien 
Amy Stephen Champaign 

April Williams Maywood 



Willi 



G. — Zweig 421 



: 




is isn't how our people 




V 




At S3, we're out to revolutionize the desktop industry. To us, inhibiting people means inhibiting 
progress. We provide an aggressive, hands-on training environment which involves working 
directly with talented and seasoned Engineers. We were recently honored as the fastest 
growing Silicon valley firm of 1993 by the San Jose Mercury News with '93 sales figures up 
269% over '92. Our products speak results — technologically innovative solutions like third 
generation accelerators that integrate full graphics functionality, mainstream graphics and 
multimedia extensions. If you're looking for the alternative to a stagnant and bureaucratic 
working environment, come to S3. 

The following are typical openings at our corporate headquarters in Santa Clara for Engineers 
graduating with a BSIMS in EE/CS. All positions require excellent written/verbal communication 
skills; prior summer internship experience in a related product area is highly desirable. 



Hardware Design Engineers 

Utilize your BS/MS in EE and logic/ASIC project design experience as 
you contribute as part of a team working on the design of S3's next 
generation GUI Accelerator as well as participate in the areas of ASIC 
design, whole chip and system simulation._and test vector generation 
Knowledge of PC graphics and familiarity with state-of-the-art 
CAD design tools such as HDL, Synopsys, and IKOS are advantageous 
Ideally, your project/coursework background includes an understanding 
of PCI or 486 bus architecture, DRAM memory systems. C programming 
and UNIX*. 

Other opportunities require a BSEE with project experience in high 
performance graphics/video board design and/or multimedia projects. 



Software Engineers 

A BSCS will give you the opportunity to work on S3's future Windows 
accelerator products. Knowledge of 80x86 assembler, C/C++ and 
386/486 PC is important, as is familiarity using different types of 
application software such as CAD. Knowledge of VGA. MS Windows 
and OS/2 will give you the foundation necessa r y to move you into 
the next generation of Graphics products 

We offer competitive salaries, excellent benefits and a commitment 
to sharing our success with our employees through stock options. 
Please send your resume, indicating position of interest, to. S3 
Incorporated. Attn: College Relations. 2770 San Tomos Expressway. 
Santa Clara. CA 95051 or FAX it to (408] 980-5444. EOE. ah trace- 

maris are registered to tne.r respective companies 




S3 Incorporated 
Accelerating products. Exhilarating careers. 



Tradition Of Excellence. 
History of Innovation. 



Since its inception in 1951, Lincoln Laboratory has 
pioneered in applying science, by means of 
advanced technology, to critical problems of national 
security. In a changing world, we will continue that 
mission, offering challenging career opportunities to 
those men and women who share our enthusiasm 
for defining the state of the art. 

We are involved in an array of projects including 
space surveillance, digital system design, free space 
and terrestrial optical communications, and air 
traffic control systems. 

To pursue unlimited opportunities, please send your 
resume to: Rosemary Malvermi at MIT Lincoln 
Laboratory, Box SU94, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, 
MA 02173-9108. An Equal Opportunity Employer, 
M/F/D/V. U.S. Citizenship Required. 



Lincoln Laboratory 



Guzik Technical Enterprises 

Guzik Technical Enterprises develops and manufactures test equipment 
for the disk drive industry. Our test systems are used in all phases of 
drive development from design to production. Every major producer 
of heads, media, and drives worldwide uses Guzik equipment. Our 
current projects require skills in: 

Electrical Engineering 

• 300 MHz Bandwidth of the Analog Channel 

• 600 MHz PLL System 

• Embedded Controller Design 

• Timing Accuracy down to 10-20 picoseconds 

• Digital Signal Processing 

• Control and Servo Systems 

Mechanical/Optical Engineering 

• Positioning Systems accurate to one rrucroinch 

• Flymg Height Tester measuring to sub-micromch level 

Software 

• Software development under MS Windows 

• Real Time Control 

• Embedded Systems Control 

• Digital Signal Processing for PRML channels 

Candidates with BS or MS degrees in related fields should send 
their resumes to: 

Guzik Technical Enterprises 

Attn: Engineering Personnel 
4620 Fortran Drive, San Jose, CA 95134 



422 Advertisements 



State Farm 



A Great 

Place 

to Work 



STATE FARM 




INSURANCE 

© 



Good people made us what we are today ... leaders in car, home, and life insurance. 
We need more good people to help us keep that position! If you are looking for full-time 
employment, please contact our Personnel Department for information on the wide 
variety of career opportunities at State Farm. 



State Farm Insurance 

Home Office Personnel 
One State Farm Plaza SA-1 
Bloomington, Illinois 61710 



State Farm Insurance Companies • Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Could This Be The 




-*,*;/ r^r 



For A New Career? 



MetLife has a career opportunity that may be just the turning point you need. 

That's because as a MetLife Account Representative, you'll be a respected professional with a 
career challenge big enough to develop the full range of your abilities. A career with virtually 
unlimited earning potential. 

You will enjoy the confidence and recognition that comes from joining a leader in a dynamically 
growing industry. 

MetLife is also a leader in providing not only great initial training, but the kind of career-long 
education that keeps adding to your success. 

And wherever you live now, or should you ever move, you will have the comfort of knowing that 
MetLife has over 1,000 offices nationwide. 



To find out more about this turning point career opportunity with MetLife, just call: 



J0INMET.ITPAY5. 

O MetLife* 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. New Yori. NY 10010 
An Hqual Opportunity Employer 



(217)359-2270 

2004 Fox Dr 
Champaign, IL 61820 



Ad 



vernsements 



423 




mg 

a Career 
Opportunity? 



Western Atlas 
Next Exit 



Western 
Geophysical 

Atlas Wireline 
Services 

Core 
Laboratories 

Western Atlas 
Software 



The four divisions of Western Atlas are at the forefront in the search 
for energy around the world. We hire science graduates (geophysics, 
geology, physics, chemistry, mathematics) to participate in all aspects 
of discovering and producing oil and gas. Engineering graduates 
(EE, ME) are needed for development of instruments and digital 
systems that acquire and process the field data. Computer science 
majors write data acquisition and processing software. 

To discover a challenging career opportunity, please send your resume 
to Bob Mason, Manager of Industrial Relations. 

©Copyright 1990 Western Atlas International. Inc All rights reserved. W94-020 




WESTERN 

ATLAS 



10205 Westheimer Road 
Houston, Texas 77042-3192 
Tel 713-266-5700 
Fax 713-952-9837 
Telex 166214 



AT&T 

Global Information 
Solutions 

We're a new company. 

We were once NCR. And the strengths and 
challenges of a global computer company with 
unparalleled capabilities in data collection and 
massively parallel processing are still here. Now 
we're combining these attributes with AT&T's 
networking expertise to be the world's best at 
bringing people together - giving them easy 
access to each other and to the information 
and services they want and need - anytime, 
anywhere. 

AT&T Global Information Solutions has the 
unique ability to help our customers get 
information, move it to where it's needed, and 
use its insights. 

We want you to be part of our team. Please 
send resumes to: 

AT&T Global Information Solutions 

17095 Via del Campo 

San Diego, California 92127 

Attn: Human Resources, SC 3 



i] -^ 



something Special 
is Happening at Equisl 



And We Invite 
You to Play an 
Integral Role. 

Join our team to 
continue building 
a dynamic local 
and national presence. 



We are searching for the 
University of Chicago's most 
energetic and aggressive 
marketers to become Equis 
brokers. Our real estate 
strategies have helped major 
corporations reduce 
occupancy costs. 
Help us spread our success. 

For more information, 
please call... 



Seth Klukoff 

Director of Marketing &. 

Communications 

1-800-726-2368 



Advertisements 



Help Change the 
Future 



Montgomery Watson is committed to protecting and 
improving the environment we leave for our children. We 
believe that caring about people begins with caring about the 
quality of our environment today, tomorrow and for 
generations to come. We believe our employees are the key to 
the future - not only for us, but for the world. 

The cornerstone of our success as one of the world's leading 
international environmental technology firms is our people 
oriented philosophy. At Montgomery Watson, progress is 
defined in personal terms. We provide the opportunity for 
personal and professional growth and the incentives that 
nurture it. Individual-accomplishment is prized and rewarded 
accordingly. Consequently we attract and retain exceptional 
individuals with a wide variety of challenging and diverse 
projects and responsibilities that match their abilities. 

Opportunities are available for Environmental/Sanitary 
Engineers and Hazardous Waste Professionals. 



MONTGOMERY WATSON 



Serving (he World's Environmental Needs 



Renee' E. Peterson 
UW-3D Southmont Drive 
Enola, PA 17025-2642 

affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer 



LOOKING FOR THE NEXT STEP? 

DIGITAL SYSTEMS, INTERNATIONAL IS IT!! 

Our well-established telecommunications firm is hiring in 
the following areas: 

Customer Support 

♦Installers 
Technical Support 

Engineering 

* Software Development 
♦Systems Engineering 

Digital Systems is an industry leader in voice and data 
communications systems, and manufactures high-end 
intelligent call processing systems. If interested in 
employment with Digital Systems, please send resume 
and salary requirements to: 



■■■■ ^IH HH H^MBB HaiHB 
MSB MM ■« MltfH ■■■■■ ■■■■■■■ 



i:.i *•** S2 usi in hil us 



6464 185th Avenue NE 
Redmond, WA 98052 



SOFTWARE 
SYSTEMS 



ENGINEERS 
ENGINEERS 



Information systems and communications technology is uniquely 

dynamic. It continues to evolve at an accelerated pace, requiring 

constant innovation and uncommon expertise. In both the Government 

and Commercial marketplace, GTE Government Systems Corporation 

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YEAR OF 




April 1994 




Justice Harry Blackman, at the age of 85, announced his 
retirement from the Supreme Court. Blackman, appointed 
during Richard Nixon's presidency, was best known for his 
majority opinion in the legalization of abortion in the Roe v. 
Wade decision. Stephen G. Breyer (pictured above) was 
sworn in as the nation's 108th Supreme Court justice during 
a private ceremony on Aug. 3, 1994. He was officially sworn 
in nine days later in a ceremony held in the East Room of the 
White House. Breyer, a federal appeals court judge from 
Massachusetts, was easily confirmed by the Senate. 

The presidents of Rwanda and Burundi were killed in 
a plane crash. The leaders were returning from a peace 
conference attempting to end the fighting between the 
Central African tribes that was leading to the death of many. 
The day after the death, police forces raided the tribal towns, 
and the death toll began to rise dramatically. 

April 8 

Morihoro Hosokawa, the prime minister of Japan, 
announced his resignation. Tsutomu Hata took his office 
on April 26, but his reign ended after only two months due 
to the lack of support from the Socialist Party. The 
Socialists returned to power, electing Tomiichi Murayama 
to lead them. 

April 18 

Dr. Jack Kevorkian admitted on TV that he helped a 
terminally ill man, Thomas Hyde, commit suicide in 1993. 
He was charged with breaking a Michigan law banning 
assisted suicide. However, he was acquitted by a Michigan 
jury on May 2. 

Rodney King was awarded $3.8 million in damages in 
compensation for the police beatings that occurred in 1991. 



.-.:;-:-. sansa . sagJSHI 



12 ! ndex/Timeline 





<2 




Altenbaumer, Jodi 




250 


Augustine, Al 


241 


/ 


J 




Althans, Tracey 




216 


Augustine, Scott 


243, 364j 


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f 


} 


Alcman, Ruth 
Altom, Kathy 




88 
310 


Aultz, Jerry 
Aung-Myim, Terri 


in' 
26; 


/ M 


m / W 


r j 


/ 


Alvarez, Lisa 


236 


363 


Aupperle, Ryan 


237 


f / v_ 


y 




Alvarez, Veronica 




312 


Auslander, Jay 


2')' 








Ahvard, Jenifer 




363 


Austgen, G. 


24' 


Aaltonen, Marja-Leena 




363 


Alwardt, Melinda 


281 


363 


Austin, Debbie 


56. 


Aardema, Nicole 


340, 363 


Amann, Chris 




321 


Austin, Nikki M. 


2.1. 


Aardema, Niki 




259 


Amato, Amy 




350 


Aver, Jeanne 


56' 


Aaron, Heinzman 




238 


Amerin, L. 




263 


Aveyard, Caitlin E. 


24: 


Abad, Dennis 




363 


Amponin, Ben 




299 


Awad, Mike 


28^ 


Abarbanel, Rachael 




239 


An, Kevin 




363 


Axe, Kathy 


245, 31C 


Abbott. Cathy 




333 


An, Sandy 




265 


Ayalon, Yuval 


215 


Abbott, Jim 




304 


Anast, Brian 


293 


363 


Ayeroff, Jason 


287 


Abbott, Tony 




304 


Ance, Kiego 




363 


Ayers, Jessica 


27' 


Abdo, Dan 




267 


Ander, D. 




257 


Ayura, Kris 


2') 


Abdul-Rahman, Nur 




363 


Anders, Darren 




290 


Ayyagari, Sunil 


28« 


Abe, Yoshiko 




363 


Andersen, Barb 


328 


338 


Azuse, Amanda 


36' 


Abern, Mike 




291 


Andersen, Barbara 


339 


363 


Azuse, Jeff 


24< 


Abernathy, Ivan 




363 


Andersen, Majbritt 




363 






Abler, Amy 


93 


363 


Anderson, Amy 


265 


363 






Abrahamson, K. 




258 


Anderson, Andrea 




345 


^r 


~P^ 


Abrams, Jenni 




261 


Anderson, Brian 




238 


f J A 


f\ 


Abrams, Josh 




290 


Anderson, C. 244 


259 


263 


LyJ 


%=*J 


Abrams, Rob 


290 


297 


Anderson, Caprice 




363 


W 


-1 


Abrams, Robert 




333 


Anderson, Chris 




299 


m A^/ 


J 


Abrams, Sean 




290 


Anderson, Colron 




286 


t-^X C 


A* 


Abrenica, Mayrling 




363 


Anderson, Dwight 




200 






Abruzino, Kim 


141 


236 


Anderson, J. 


258 


263 


Babb, Judith 


»5 


Abu-Shalback, Kahlid 




363 


Anderson, Jen 


236, 261 


Babb, Judy 


M 


Abundis, Cecilia 




296 


Anderson, Julie 




363 


Babelnieks, Linda 


36 


Acharya, Snigdha 




363 


Anderson, Kari 




250 


Babiarez, Meredith E 


24 


Achord, Shanna 




310 


Anderson, Kendra 




285 


Babski, Diane 


33 


Achtenberg, Dawn 




363 


Anderson, Linda 




363 


Babu, Ashvin 


32 


Acker, Courtney 




326 


Anderson, Lisa 




363 


Backe, Christina 


!6 


Ackerman, Ian 




297 


Anderson, Scott 




363 


Baddick, Christine 244, 339, 346, 36 


Ackerman, Mara 




285 


Anderson, T. 




328 


Baer, Brock 


14 


Acosta, Alonso 




120 


Anderson, Traci 




363 


Baer, Elizabeth 


339, 36 


Acosta, Jon 




241 


Andersson, Liisa 




279 


Baertschi, Pia 


V, 


Adamik, Karen 




363 


Andreas-Hobin, C. 




263 


Baex, Franklin 


» 


Adamo, Jen 




236 


Andrejak, Dave 




285 


Bahena, Jose 


2 


Adams, A.J. 




291 


Andrews, A. 




257 


Bahrmasel, Carrie 


26 


Adams, Angela 




363 


Andrews, Alexis 




257 


Bailey, Chris 


2') 


Adams, Bill 




237 


Andrews, Benjamin 




363 


Bailey, Julie 


23 


Adams, Elizabeth 




363 


Andrews, Teri 




281 


Bailitz, John 


25 


Adams, Eric 


322 


363 


Angelino, Joe 




252 


Bailitz, Owen 


2^ 


Adams, H. 




259 


Angio, Melissa 249 


,328 


,335 


Bairn, Kimberly 


261. 36 


Adams, L. 




245 


Anichini, Jim 




305 


Baima, Eric 


28 


Adams, Michelle 




255 


Anichini, Michael305, 306, 339, 346 


Bainbridge, Jennifer 


36 


Adcock, Heather 




271 


Ankeney, Scott 




291 


Bair, Chris 


25 


Adcock, Melissa 




271 


Annacone, Allison L. 




242 


Baker, Akilah 


23 


Addotta, Paul 




286 


Ansari, Saima 


250 


,363 


Baker, Brent 


Aden, Julie 




236 


Anspach, A. 




244 


Baker, Doug 


2h 


Adjabeng, Belinda 




363 


Anthony, Aimee 




257 


Baker, E. 


25" 


Adsuar, Natalie 




197 


Anthony, James 


284 


,363 


Baker, Eileen 


259.36 


Aeschleman, Heather 


279 


351 


Antokal, Missy 




261 


Baker, Erin 21 


327,333,34 


Aggertt, Michelle 




255 


Antonelli, A. 




273 


Baker. Molly 


36 


Agrest, Jeff 


290 


312 


Antonelli, Ashley 




259 


Baker, Seth 


237, 2SJ 

s6 


Aguilar, Annissa Kuki 




296 


Antonietti, Michelle 




329 


Baker, Yolanda 


Ahad, Badia 




346 


Antonini, Jill 




285 


Baker, Zivar 


40 


Ahlers, Carmen 


274, 307 


Antonopoulos, Dion 




363 


Baksay, Maria 


263, 340, 36 


Ahrends, Tabetha 




363 


Antonopoulos, G. 




260 


Bakshis, Douglas 


3( 


Ahrens, Jill 


257, 3( 


Appleman, Donald 




363 


Bala, B.K. 


2f 


Ahrling, Julie 




269 


April, Jennifer 




239 


Balaoing, Alan 


3d 
25 


Aidlen, Jeremy 




363 


Arana, Bea 




285 


Balch. Jessica 


Aiken, Michael 




148 


Aranda, Aldo 




304 


Balch. Portia 


25 


Aitken, C. 




249 


Aranda, Edhar 




297 


Baldner, Jaime N. 


2' 


Akan, Andy 




338 


Aranda, Roger 




323 


Baldoza, Vera Marie 


27. 


Akan, Ender 




363 


Arber, Elaine 




261 


Baldrich, Camille 


196, 19 


Akerman, Kyle 


260 


363 


Archer, A. 




257 


Balek, Stephen 


3( 


Akinaka, Sarah 




281 


Archer, Corbin 




198 


Balian, Michael 


?< 


Akinkunle, Adedeji 




345 


Arciga, Monica 




363 


Balis, George 


28 


Akiyama, Yukari 




363 


Ardickas, Asta 




363 


Ball. Adrienne 


2 = 


Alagna, Daniella 




80 


Arenberg, David 


290 


,310 


Ball, Stephanie 


12 


Alberici, Jennifer 


247 


363 


Arendarczyk, Jennifer 




314 


Ballance, Alison 


SC- 


Albers, Rob 




327 


Arends, Carrie 




250 


Ballsrud, Jenny 


ll 


Albert, Y^vonne 




343 


Arends, Scott 




251 


Ballsrud, Kathy 


23 


Alberts, Clifford 


260 


363 


Argao, Mike 




281 


Balon, Ed 


3C 


Alberts, Lisa 


285 


335 


Argenrin, Julie 


279, 3c 


Baloun, Lauren M. 


2-i 


Albertson, Mary 


189 


258 


Arling, Adam 




304 


Baltes, Dan 


2< 


Albovias, Michelle 




363 


Armstead, Willis 




363 


Baltes, Danny 


y 


Albrecht, Luke 




337 


Armstrong, Catherine 




363 


Baly.K. 


2 = 


Alessia, Mark 




109 


Armstrong, K. 




244 


Bambule, S. 


2( 


Alex, Mina 


247 


363 


Arndt, Jason 




321 


Bandy, Laura 


2' 


Alex, V. 




247 


Arndt, Jenny 




236 


Bandyopadhyay, Saptarshe 34 


Alexander, C. 




245 


Arndt, Jonathan 




363 


Bange, Steven 


3( 


Alexander, Joe 




214 


Arndt, S. 




244 


Bankier, Seth 


:■ 


Alexander, Trent 




252 


Arnold, Stacy 




279 


Bante, Suzanne 


2> 


Ali, Bahaa 




31 


Arnold, Talley 


285 


,363 


Baptist, Allan 


2' 


Alison, Begor 




310 


Arseneau, Leslie 




363 


Baran, M. 


2< 


Alitto, Henry 




345 


Artega, R. 




260 


Baran, Mary C. 


2< 


Allaman, Lori 255 


,310 


316 


Artime, Shelby 




363 


Baranauskas, Nicole 


r, 


Allen, Amy 




363 


Aruldoss, Denise 


271 


364 


Baranski, Nicole 


21 


Allen, Derek 




363 


Asaro, A. 




258 


Baranzelli, Angela 


260. 3( 


Allen, Grade 




363 


Ascar, Chad 




364 


Barbakoff", Scort 


2S 


Allen, Kenn 




10 


Ascolani, Damon 


333 


364 


Barber, Jacquerae 


3( 


Allen, Kirsten 




363 


Asfaw, Elizabeth 




364 


Barber, Jai 


2' 


Allison, Barry 




363 


Assmus, Laurie 




285 


Barcalow, Jeffrey 


H 


Allison, E. 




249 


Atalla, A. 




260 


Barch, J. 


2, 


Allman, Rob 




238 


Atkins, Jacki 




316 


Barengo, B. 


2 ; 


Allord, S. 




328 


Atkins, Krystal 




343 


Barker, Julianna 


31 


Allswang, Jenny 




239 


Atkinson, Brian 




210 


Barker, Shari 


- ; 


Almon, Ryan 




314 


Atkinson, Drew 




246 


Barklev. Krista 


2 ; 


Alog, Melissa 




363 


Arwater, Brett 




33 


Barman, Jason 


1 


Alonto, Augusto 




363 


Au, Alice 




321 


Barman, Julie 


2 


Alsberg, Stephanie 


242 


363 


Aubin, Ryan 


84 


335 


Barnes, Doug 


305, 3' 


Alstrin, Kevin 




241 


Auer, Jeanne 




236 


Barnes, Jeff 


32 


Alt, Jon 


186 


290 


Augius, Lina 




285 


Barnes, L. 


2- 


Alcenbaumer, Brian 




363 


Augspurger, Nathan 




237 


Barnes, Ronda 


3< 



Barnes, S. 




244 


Belton, Zach 


253, 332 


Biros, Scott 


238 


,365 


Batnett, Glen 




100 


Beltrame, J. 


244 


Bischmann, Ben 




335 


Barnett, Kristen 




285 


Belva, Heath 


251 


Bisell, K. 




260 


Barney, Julie 




321 


Benak, Lubka 


279 


Bishir, Shane 




365 


Barone, Janeen 




421 


Benak, Otilia 


279 


Bishop, Courtney 




285 


Barr, Amber 




335 


Benassi, Dan 


252 


Bishop, E. 




263 


Barr, Karen 




236 


Benberg, John 


333 


Bishop, Mark 




365 


Barr, Susan 


23C 


,271 


Bender, Jamie 


261 


Bishop, S. 




263 


Barrerr, J. 




269 


Bending, B. 


249 


Birtner, Barr 




332 


Barrett, Julie 


344 


,364 


Bendow, Adena 


239 


Biryou, Lazar 




299 


Barren, Mike 




345 


Bendre, Anup 


364 


Bjornberg, Andrew 


281 


,365 


Barretto, Chrisropher 


364 


Benedetto, D. 


245 


Black, Darci 




279 


Barrientes, John 




243 


Benedict, C. 


249 


Blackford, John 


253 


,365 


Barrios, K. 




269 


Benes, Brian 


340 


Blacklock, Heather 




365 


Barrios, Lynda 




271 


Benig, V, 


257 


Blackmon, Pete 




303 


Barry, Dan 




304 


Benion, Ernest 


179 


Blada, Jeff 




285 


Barry, K. 




249 


Benivegna, Michael 


364 


Blade, Edward 




365 


Barry, Larry 


37 


,284 


Benjamin, Darren 


299 


Blaine, Brady 


198 


,293 


Barry, Robert 




124 


Benner, Kresin 


364 


Blair, E. 




260 


Barsuk, J. 




260 


Bennert, Karen 


351 


Blair, Jon 




251 


Bartell, Kelly 




364 


Bennett, Andy 


291 


Blake, Michelle 


12,273 


,307 


Barth, Brian 




252 


Bennett, Elizabeth 


340 


Blanchette, Clayton 




238 


Bartik, Jeff 




321 


Bennett, Karen 


351 


Blankenburg, Lara 




271 


Bartkowicz, Amy 




285 


Bennett, Kevin 


364 


Blascoe, A. 




259 


Bartlett, L. 




249 


Bennett, Robert 


168 


Blazier, Jason 




287 


Bartlow, Aaron 




253 


Bennett, Sean 


224 


Bleich, Michelle 




365 


Barrlow, Andrew 


253, 267, 364 


Benoit, Mike 


321 


Blickhan, B. 




259 


Bartolai, Paul 




246 


Benson, Amanda 


271 


Blickhan, Gary 




365 


Banolic, N. 




273 


Benson, Sally 


313 


Blickhan, Mark 




365 


Barton, Julie 


19, 364 


Bentlage, William 


364 


Blinn, Bobby 




116 


Bartos, Roger 




321 


Bentle, Thomas 


243 


Blinn, Tara 


81 


,236 


Basak, Mark 




251 


Bentley, Michael 


364 


Bliss, Barry 




237 


Basch, Brian 


285,310 


,350 


Berbaum, Janice 


321,365 


Bliss, Timothy 




365 


Bashaw, Jennifer 




108 


Bereman, Alice 


365 


Bloch, R. 




244 


Basich, Alex 




280 


Berenson, Cynthia 


281 


Block, Debra 




365 


Basler, Peter 


299 


,364 


Berent, Aylin 


365 


Block, Jess 




280 


Bass, S. 




259 


Berg, Dawn 


257 


Block, Minda 




261 


Bassler, Ryan 




297 


Berg, K. 


273 


Block, Nick 


238, 316, 320 


Basson, Michau 




198 


Berg, N. 


259 


Bloemer, Tony 


241 


,365 


Batchellor, Lisa 




285 


Berg, Peter 


365 


Blohm, L. 




249 


Bates, Jennifer 


204, 230 


,364 


Bergan, Alexis 


365 


Blomquist, John 




365 


Bates, Rachael 


260, 271 


,364 


Bergdolt, Barbara 


279 


Blonz, Alan 


290, 342 


,365 


Bathke, Kim 




216 


Berge, Jill 


31 


Blough, Brandon 




365 


Batie, Maurice 




164 


Berger, Kerry 


239 


Blouin.Jeff 




335 


Batt, Jaclyn 




197 


Berger, Maria 


340 


Blubaum, Tracey 




365 


Batten, B. 




247 


Berger, Reed 


239 


Blue, Jacqueline 




365 


Battung, Divina 




364 


Bergman, M. 


269 


Blue, Jennifer 




273 


Batry, Jen 




257 


Bergman, Michael 


365 


Blue, Jim 




421 


Bauer, Frederick 




364 


Bergsrud, Erika 


365 


Bluestone, David 




290 


Bauer, Kimberly 


316,364 


Bergstrom, J. 


269 


Blumberg, Dave 




312 


Bauer, Michelle 




239 


Bergstrom, Janna 


365 


Blume, D. 




247 


Bauer, Steve 




92 


Berk, Dana 


239 


Blumenthal, Michael 




365 


Bauer, Tyler 




364 


Berk, Jamie 


239 


Blythe, Cathy 263 


339, 350 


,365 


Bauman, Kelly 




364 


Berke, Brett 


303 


Bobe, Jen 




285 


Bauman, L. 


258 


328 


Berkman, Douglas 


365 


Bobis, Jeff 




346 


Baumann, John 




195 


Berlet, J. 


328 


Bodine, Bill 


253 


316 


Baumgartner, Keena 


255 


364 


Berman, Carrie 


261 


Bodmer, Ashley 




281 


Baumgartner, Wade 




237 


Berman, H. 


249 


Bodrogi, Robert 




365 


Bausell, H. 




249 


Berman, Jamie 


261 


Boe, Tracy 


255 


316 


Bava, Denise 




257 


Bernas, Korie 


365 


Boehm, Naomi 




335 


Bavougian, E. 




245 


Berner, Julie 


329 


Boeing, Eric 




335 


Bax, Susan 




364 


Bernero, Katie 


261 


Boeke, T. 




259 


Baxter, Michael 




364 


Berning, A. 


257 


Boens, G. 




244 


Beach, Scott 




251 


Bernosky, Greg 


286 


Boettcher, Brian 


246, 365 


Beachler, Craig 




299 


Bernstein, Dave 


280 


Boewe, Celia 




236 


Beard, Ed 




210 


Bernstein, Karen 


239 


Bogan, Raki 




224 


Beard, Sarah 




271 


Berquist, I. 


269 


Bogle, Amy 


321 


365 


Beasley, Lelah 




344 


Berry, Barbara 


365 


Bogoslaw, Debbie 




239 


Beason, Chris 




303 


Berry, M. 


257 


Bogoslaw, Richard 




365 


Beatty, Jason 




343 


Berry, Shellean 


250 


Bogusch, Laura 


242 


365 


Beaudry, Laura 




364 


Berry, Suzanne 


365 


Bohan, Donnelly 


259 


365 


Beauvoir, Suzanne 


239 


333 


Berta, Todd 


284 


Bohle, Julie 




255 


Beavers, Brandon 




345 


Berthusen, Katherine 


365 


Bohman, Joetta 




345 


Beba, Kristen M. 




242 


Bertram, Brian 


252 


Boian, Theresa 


265 


332 


Bechtel, Dan 




287 


Bertram, Darren 


252 


Bolas, Joanna 




279 


Bechtold, Joann 




365 


Best, Greg 


267 


Bolda, Dan 




266 


Becker, Jackie 




271 


Beth, Kevin 


291 


Boldt, Jeff 




238 


Becker, Jim 




207 


Betz, Rachel A. 


242 


Bolero, Kelly 




365 


Becker, S. 




244 


Beverly, Jon 


365 


Bollmeier, Elizabeth 




365 


Beckering, Kurt 




252 


Beverly, Matt 


299 


Bolon, Val 




239 


Beckes, D. 




260 


Beyers, Ben 


195 


Bolos, Dee 




239 


Beckett, Diane 




26 


Beyers, Jennifer 


242, 365 


Bolsoni, Mark 




251 


Beckett, Kelly 


26, 271 


335 


Bezman, Michele 


239 


Bolt, K. 




249 


Beckman, E. 




263 


Bhakta, S. 


269 


Bolton, Kendra 




250 


Beckman, Heather 




364 


Bhanpuri, Adnan 


41 


Bond, Jeff 




252 


Beckman, Sarah 


285, 350 


351 


Bhatt, Nehal 


310 


Bone, Brian 


108 


285 


Beckwitt, Mary Anne 




250 


Bhatt, Vivek 


252 


Bonello, Angela 




236 


Bednar, Ron 




287 


Bhojwani, Navin 


281 


Bonesteel, Timothy 




333 


Bednarz, Kim 




285 


Bialecki, Eldad 


280 


Bonesz, Ronald 




365 


Beedon, Dan 




304 


Biancalana, Christina 


285 


Bong, Jeffrey 




326 


Beegun, Denise E. 




242 


Biancalana, Elisa V. 


242 


Bonick, Jason 




251 


Beeler, Hugh 




364 


Bianchi, Gail 


239 


Bonick, Martin 




365 


3eers, Kevin 




285 


Bianchi, Renee 


285 


Bonnan, Rebecca 




329 


Beeuwsaert, Bradley 




364 


Biando], Beth 


285 


Bonsignore, Fenna 




230 


Begor, Alison Paige 


245 


344 


Biangini, Lori 


265 


Bonus, Debbie 




250 


Behling, Ryan 


333 


347 


Bianzon, Gary 


303 


Booker, P. 




259 


3ehme, Jeffrey 


238 


364 


Bickelhaupt, Jane 


255 


Booton, Brian 




380 


3ehrends, Gail 




364 


Biebel, Kevin 


365 


Borak, Rachel 




261 


Jehrendt, Christa 




370 


Biehl, Becky 


208,317 


Borelli, Mike 




251 


3ehreus, Theodore 




364 


Biehl, Lia 


317 


Borkowski, Bill 




281 


Seil, S. 




247 


Bielick, Brian 


107 


Bornkamp, Suzanne 




365 


Jekas, John 




364 


Bierman, K. 


273 


Borowski, L. 




247 


Jelin, Kristen 




364 


Biggs, M. 


260 


Borror, Jennifer 




365 


Sell, Brian 




243 


Bilder, L. 


257 


Borske, Erinl64, 166 


167,228 


229 


Sell, E. 




263 


Bilyeu, Stacy 


365 


Borstein, Dan 




350 


Jell, Sarah 




263 


Binder, B. 


260 


Borucki, Jason 




305 


Jell, Suzanne 


244 


364 


Bingham, Susan 


236 


Boston, Jenni 




285 


Sellis, S. 




259 


Bingman, Chad 


238 


Boston, Michael 


253, 363, 36 


Jello, Nolan 




364 


Binkowsi, Andy 


293 


Botica, C. 




244 


lellows, Jeff 




179 


Biolchini, Jeff 


285 


Botica, J. 




244 



April 18 

Jean Driscoll won the Boston Marathon in record 
time in the women's wheelchair division. Her time of 
1 hour, 34 minutes and 22 seconds beat the previous 
record that she had also held. 

April 19 

Arsenio Hall announced the termination his five 
year long television show due to competition. The 
movement of David Letterman to an earlier broadcast 
time proved to be too much competition for Hall. 

April 22 

Richard M. Nixon, the 37th president of the United 
States, died in New York City. 

The U.S. Coast Guard brought a wooden freighter 
carrying 406 Haitians to Florida. All the passengers 
were allowed to seek political asylum. 

April 23 

An estimated 100,000 people were declared dead 
and two million people were declared displaced since 
April 6 during the ethnic fighting in Rwanda. 

April 25 

The first South African multiracial elections began. 
After winning the election, Nelson Mandela was inaugu- 
rated as South Africa's first black leader on May 10, 1994. 

May 1994 

May 5 

Michael Fay was caned in Singapore for vandalism 
of cars. He was released from prison twelve weeks later 
on June 21. Fay, an American teenager, was accused of 
spray painting cars, and was flogged six times. 

May 6 

Paula Jones, an Arkansas state employee, filed 
charges against President Clinton for allegedly sexual 
harrassing her in 1991- Clinton denied the charges. 

The Channel Tunnel, a tunnel connecting France 
and England, was inaugurated. This 32 mile link took 
six years to complete and cost $15 billion. 

May 7 

The White House announced a new policy of 
granting asylum interviews to Haitian refugees. 

May 10 

Convicted murderer John Wayne Gacy was ex- 
ecuted by lethal injection in Illinois. 

May 19 

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, widow of President 
John F. Kennedy, died at the age of 64 after a long battle 
with cancer. 



Index/Timeline 433 



YEAR OF 




May 1994 

May 24 

Denny's Restaurant agreed to pay $54 million in a 
settlement for discriminating against black customers. 

The defendants in the World Trade Center bombing 
were given prison sentences of 240 years. 

May 26 

The Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act was 
signed by President Clinton. This act makes it a federal 
crime to threaten or use force to interfere with anyone 
providing or receiving abortions. 



June 1994 

June 6 

The 50th anniversary of D-Day was commemorated 
by the American public. Veterans and visitors went to 
Arlington National Cemetery to pay tribute to the many 
Americans who sacrificed their lives during World War II. 

June 12 

Haiti declared a state of emergency because the 
country faced invasion and occupation. 

June 17 









m3 






lyL- mm 


y Wl 






5 * Hto^. 


jwl 




IK , n '|r^ 


I 1 










■ 'j- ' '.- -:M ; I 





The Los Angeles police charged former football player, 
O.J. Simpson, with the murders of his ex- wife Nicole Brown 
Simpson and Ron Goldman. Instead of turning himself in as 
promised, Simpson had his friend, Al Cowlings, drive him on 
a rambling jaunt along southern California's freeways. The 
chase was televised on all major stations in front of 95 million 
viewers. The chase ended when Simpson's Bronco returned 
to his west Los Angeles house where he surrendered to 



434 Index/Timeline 



Bort, Karen 




365 


Brown, Heidi 


281 


Burton, Scaci 


lb 


Boudreau, Carla 




30 


Brown, J. 


273, 328 


Busboom, Derek 


253,316,361 


Bounds, Jennifer 




281 


Brown, Jeff 


310,316 


Busboom, Jason 


28 


Bova, Rico 




332 


Brown, Jill 339 


346, 366 


Busboom, Lyle 


25 


Bowers, E. 




258 


Brown, Julie 


255 


Busch, G. 


25: 


Bowers, Kevin 




365 


Brown, L. 


247, 273 


Busch, Matt 


12 


Bowler, Josh 




246 


Brown, Linsey 


339 


Buschman, Barb 


35: 


Bowman, Aaron 




293 


Brown, Lynn 


346, 350 


Buschmann, Barbara 


36 


Boyd, Brian 




304 


Brown, Marni 


261 


Busen, S. 


24 


Boyd, Joe 




304 


Brown, Matt 


297 


Bush, Justin 


23 


Boyd, Leslie 




365 


Brown, Michelle 


242, 366 


Bush, Laura 


36 


Boyer, Chrisroper 




365 


Brown, Pamela J. 


242 


Bussone, Doug 


26 


Boyle, Kenneth 




45 


Brown, Paul 


280 


Butcher, Tracy L. 


24 


Boysen, Daniel 




365 


Brown, Rob 


238 


Butcher, Valerie 


25 


Bozarth, John 


326, 327, 365 


Brown, Ryan 


266 


Burkauskas, A. 


27 


Bracken, Deana 




365 


Brown, S. 


247 


Burkiewicz, Andy 


29 


Bradenkamp, L. 




273 


Brown, Sarah 


279, 366 


Butler, Brenna 


9 


Bradford, E. 




269 


Brown, Scott 


366 


Butler, Diana 


36 


Bradshaw, Curt 




299 


Brown, Sreven 


366 


Butler, Jennifer 


36 


Bradshaw, Patrick 




365 


Brown, Susan 


366 


Butler, Stephen 


36 


Brady, Matthew 


341 


365 


Brown, Veronica 


296 


Butts, Jamie 


28 


Brady, Seth 




179 


Brownell, Kevin 


297 


Butts, Kelly 


28 


Braid, Amanda 


273 


351 


Brownell, L. 


259 


Butzow, Chad 


36 


Brakenridge, Scott 


138 


243 


Bruce, Barbara 


366 


Butzow, Jennifer 


36 


Brame, S. 




245 


Bruce, Lori 141 


236, 366 


Bychowski, Karen 


36 


Brammeier, Nathan 


301 


333 


Bruce, Virginia 


366 


Bye, Suzanne 


M 


Brandalino, Amy J. 




242 


Bruch, Andrea 


259, 340 


Byers, L. 


24 


Brandi, Rebecca 


247, 36 


Bruch, Cindi 


366 


Bykowski, L. 


25 


Brandt, B. 




258 


Bruck, Gina E. 


242 


Byrd, Gina 


25 


Branham, Jon 




280 


Bruggerman, Jeff 


297 


Byrnes, T. Parrick 


30 


Brannstorm, M. 




257 


Brumund, Kevin 


335, 366 


Byron, Aaron 


)6 


Branom, Matt 




246 


Brunette, A. 


244 


Byun, Eddie 


36 


Bransford, Michelle 




365 


Bruno, F. 


258 






Brant, Peter 




281 


Bruns, Paul 


299 






Brashear, Genefer 




255 


Bruns, Tim 


252 


s — ^ 


^~) 


Brasky, Steven 




299 


Brushaber, Kristina 


366 


( s 


y 


Braun, Jennifer 




245 


Brust, Donald 339 


, 350, 366 


\m£- 


^ 


Braun, Jim 




321 


Bruzek, Karhleen 


344, 366 


w7^ 




Braun, Mary 




344 


Brya, Lisa 


366 


W SJ 




Braverman, Alan 




322 


Bryanr, Band-Aid 


335 


\^s 




Braverman, Amy 




239 


Bryant, Barbara Everitt 


16, 17 






Bray, Eric 




186 


Bryant, Brooke 


285 


Caan, Serens 


56 


Brazzale, Margaret 




365 


Bryant, Chrisrian 


213 


Cabage, Mike 


2') 


Breading, Krisrin 




366 


Bryant, M. 


273 


Cable, Dave 


21 


Breden, Steve 




284 


Bryerton, Eric 


366 


Cabote, Brian 


284, 36 


Bredenburg, Helen 


323 


339 


Bryl, Galit 


351 


Cabrales, Ester 


27, 29. 


Breen, Marnie 


258 


366 


Buan, Joselle 


182 


Cabrales, Juan 


28 


Brees, Curt 




280 


Bubey, Marissa 


261 


Cabrera, Lou 


26 


Brehart, Dawn 




279 


Buchanan, Gordon 


338, 366 


Cacioppa, Dan 


56 


Breimeier, Russell 




366 


Buchanan, N. 


257 


Caffarella, Kalene 


2S 


Breitstein, R. 




328 


Buchanan, Nicole 


296 


Cahill, Brian 


23 


Brell, Amy 




242 


Bucher, Gretchen 


250 


Cain, Grant 


28 


Bremer, Julie 




366 


Buchheit, Brian 


366 


Cain, Mary 


36 


Bremmier, Nate 




286 


Buchman, Eleanor 


261 


Calabrese, Tony 


26 


Brennan, Brian 




246 


Buckert, K. 


247 


Caldwell, Amy 


244,3d 


Brennan, Bridgett 




244 


Bucklar, John 


243 


Cale, Shannon 


23 


Brennan, Emma 


236,314 


,315 


Buckley, Sean 


281 


Calgaro, Brund 


33 


Brennan, Marry 




304 


Buckvich, J. 


259 


Calhoun, Doug 


29 


Brenner, A. 




245 


Budde, Christopher 


366 


Cali, Jami 


33 


Brens, Jake 




266 


Buddie, Miguel 


302 


Callahan, Chris 


24 


Bretthauer, Scott 




238 


Budelier, Mark 


366 


Callahan, Pat 


2'< 


Bretz, Jason 


299 


,366 


Buedel, Mike 


284 


Camaioni, Marino 


36 


Breuer, Simon 




246 


Buedel, Tracy 


279 


Camarena, Gloria 


2.' 


Brewbaker, Jennifer 




366 


Buenaflor, Claire 


366 


Cameron, Jerry 


29' 


Brewer, J. 




245 


Buente, Danielle 


366 


Cameron, Jim 


29 


Brewer, Srephanie 




236 


Buffo, T. 


258 


Camp, Nancy 


28, 


Brey, A. 




263 


Buhrman, Tonya 


250 


Campanelli, Gino 


30 


Bridge, Jeff 




287 


Bui, Dennis 


366 


Campanile, Nick 


36 


Bridges, Steve 




195 


Builta, Andy 


253 


Campbell, Corey 


30 


Briggs, Derek 




246 


Buisseret, Mark 


366 


Campbell, Ed 


30 


Briggs, James 




227 


Bujnowski, Deborah 


366 


Campbell, John 


304, 55i. 36 


Bright, J. 




259 


Bukvich, Jamie 


259, 366 


Campbell, Lara 


7 


Bright, K. 




244 


Bullerman, Alison 


334 


Campbell, Michael 


36 


Brignon, Ed 




304 


Bullock, Jason 


39 


Campbell, Mike 


32' 


Brigs, Derek 




246 


Bullon, Diego 


251,366 


Campbell, Sally 


36 


Brill, Janine 




279 


Bundt, A. 


269 


Camper, Justin 


1 


Brinkman, Jennifer 


244 


,366 


Bungcayao, Isabelo 


366 


Camper, Sarah 247, 307, 339, 36 


Brinkman, N. 




257 


Bunselmeyer, Amy 


255 


Campion, C. 


24 


Brister, Jennette 




366 


Bunre, Anne 


279 


Campion, Julie 


23 


Britter, Torya 




296 


Bunring, Laura 


281,421 


Campion, S. 


32 


Britton, Doug 




305 


Bunting, Michael 


366 


Campion, Sara 


31 


Brochmann, Nate 




340 


Burde, K. 


247 


Canavan, Bob 


28 


Brockelman, Karen 




366 


Burenga, Tom 


237 


Candler, Nashonne 


36 


Brockett, Ben 


321 


,366 


Burger, Brian 


284 


Canna, J. 


25 


Brockhurst, U. 




247 


Burger, Darcy 


230 


Cannon, John 


29 


Broderick, Rachel 




285 


Burke, Barbara 


366 


Canrelis, Nick 


29 


Brodrueck, Julie 


245 


,366 


Burke, Corina 


279, 366 


Cantwell, C. 


26 


Brody, Harry 




280 


Burke, Elizabeth 


340 


Capbell, Michael 


36 


Brody, Jeremy 




241 


Burke, Margie 


321 


Capers, Donna 


36 


Broms, Bridgit 


258 


,366 


Burke, Pat 


299 


Capes, J. 


: ; 


Broms, Michael 




280 


Burke, Patrick 


293, 366 


Caponigri, Carolyn 


249. 36" 


Broneck, Cheryl 




366 


Burke, Ryan 


251 


Caponigri, Meg 


: ; ' 


Brooks, Marthew 




366 


Burkybile, Anne 


255, 366 


Caprio, K. 


24 


Brooks, Mike 




237 


Burkybile, Carrie 


255, 366 


Capulong, Angel 


29 


Brooks, Tanya 




265 


Burleson, Parry 


313 


Carbine, C. 


24 


Brotherton, B. 




258 


Burman, Todd 


280 


Carcerano, Carl 


: ; 


Brotschul, Marry 




281 


Burnert, Liz 


335 


Cargill, Dan 


32 


Brouwer, Rhonda 




250 


Burnett, Peggie 


333 


Carley, Allen 


36 


Brown, B. 




259 


Burns. A. 


263 


Carlin, Adela 


14 


Brown, Becky 




255 


Burns, Edward 


322, 366 


Carlin, Mark 


36 


Brown, Brad 




366 


Burns, Kathy 


39, 245 


Carlin, Peter 


36 


Brown, Chester 




366 


Burns, Scott 


291 


Carls, Christopher 


56 


Brown, Chuck 




287 


Burnsrine, Mark 


252 


Carlson. B. 


24 


Brown, Colleen 


112 


,236 


Burrell, Debbie 


285 


Carlson, Eric 


25 


Brown, Dorian 




366 


Burrell, Diane 


245 


Carlson, J. 


27 


Brown, Ellen 




335 


Burroughs, Chris 


304 


Carlson, Jason 


36 


Brown, Eric 




228 


Burrus, Ben 


145 


Carlson, Jen 


"1,251 


Brown, Erica 




129 


Bursiek, Katy 


236 


Carlson, Jennifer 


339, 36; 


Brown, Greg 


238 


,366 


Burt, Brian 


266 


Carlson, K. 


24' 


Brown, Heather 




236 


Burton, Andy 


303 


Carlson, Karen Cod) 


91 



Carlson, Kathy 




265 


Chen, Mike 


338 


Cokel, Trina 


279 


Carlson, Laura 138 


,247 


,258 


Cheng, Kathy 


326, 327 


Cole, Annerte 


255 


Carlson, Quinn 




184 


Cherny. J- 


249 


Cole, Holly 


285 


Carlson, T. 




247 


Cherny, Serge 


299 


Cole, Matt 


238 


Carmichael, Craig 




243 


Cherpak, Jason 


280 


Cole, Tracy 


281 


Carmichael, Jcnnifer247, 328, 339, 367 


Cheung, Kenny 


321 


Coleman, Jeremy 


280 


Carmichael, K. 




269 


Chevalier, Jeff 


281 


Coleman, Kevin 


299 


Carmichael, Noah 




241 


Chheda, Sejal 


371 


Coleman, Lisa 


261 


Carmody, Mate 




280 


Chiarito, Jennifer 


371 


Coleman, Liza 


371 


Carnevale, K. 




257 


Chidley, K. 


258 


Coleman, Tim 


299, 371 


Carolan, Shawn 




246 


Chikos, Keeley 


32 


Collen, Josh 


285 


Carothcrs, Brian 




285 


Childers, David 


371 


Collins, Bob 


267 


Carr, Jamie 




78 


Chilron, Mark 


299 


Collins, Dan 


179,371 


Carrasco, A. 




258 


Chin, E. 


244 


Collins, Kerry 


157,285 


Carroll, Bill 




136 


Chin, Marlene 


371 


Collins, L. 


249 


Carroll, Brian 




281 


Chin, Yvonne 


236 


Collins, M. 


249 


Carroll, Roland 




241 


Chinn, S. 


269 


Collins, Michelle 


312,330 


Carsello, J. 




328 


Chiu, Cynthia 


371 


Colter, Donna 


250 


Carson, Sara 




367 


Chiu, Roger 


297, 371 


Colwell, Thea 


345 


Carter, J.J. 




252 


Chlebek, Krystyna 


371 


Compratt, Andrew 


243 


Carter, Natalie 




346 


Cho, Peter 


321 


Condon, S. 


249 


Carus, Pete 




333 


Chobot, Anthony 


371 


Condon, William 


371 


Caruso, A. 




273 


Choi, Joon 


285 


Condron, Dave 


299 


Caruso, Cathy 




367 


Chojnacki, Paula 


421 


Conklin, Tom 


253, 332, 333 


Casaccio, Jack 




267 


Chon, Amy 


371 


Conneen, Molly 


371 


Casaclang, Cornelio 




25 


Chong, Jocelyn 


371 


Connell, C. 


245 


Casey, Dan 




246 


Chong, Mindy 


257, 371 


Connell, Christie 


300 


Casey, Elizabeth 




344 


Chorney, Sracey 


261 


Council, James 


237, 306, 371 


Casey, George 




267 


Chou, Helen 


265 


Conner, Brian 


253 


Casey, Jennifer 




258 


Chou, Jeff 


243 


Conner, E. 


257 


Casey, Joe 




304 


Chow, Albert 


286, 371 


Conner, Thembi 


371 


Casey, Marty 




335 


Chow, Truda 


371 


ConnifT, Michael 


280 


Casey, Sharon 




367 


Chow, Vivian 


339 


Connors, Jim 


299 


Casey, Steve 




367 


Chowderoski, Jason 


246 


Conroy, Melissa 


250, 371 


Cash, Christie 




279 


Choy, Scott 


321 


Conroy, Narhan 


293 


Cashman, Andrew 




243 


Christ, Daniel 


371 


Conroy, Nicole 


249 


Casimiro, Dennis 


303 


,367 


Christensen, Colleen 


314,315 


Conti, Patricia 


271,371 


Casis, Cassandra 




367 


Christensen, Peggy 3H 


,321,371 


Conway, Toby 


321 


Casner, J. 




245 


Christensen, Mark 


284 


Coogan, Colleen 


371 


Casper, Steve 




304 


Christian, James 


342, 371 


Cook, A. 


263 


Cassel, Chad 




185 


Christman, Pam 


316 


Cook, Dave 


267 


Cassell, Emily 




285 


Chrisropolous, Niki 


261 


Cook, Erik 


241 


Castelan, Francisco 




402 


Chrones, William 


371 


Cook, Julie 


271 


Castelloni, Carol 




321 


Chu, Roger 


297 


Cook, Michael 


37 


Castillo, Kristina 


314 


315 


Chudnow, Beth 


261 


Cook, Shelly 


271 


Castillo, Manuel 




394 


Chung, Bryan 


246 


Cookis, Judith M. 


242 


Castillo, Melba 




367 


Chung, S. 


263 


Cooksey, Melissa 


271 


Castillo, Rich 




293 


Churak, Maribeth 


371 


Coombe, Emily 


265 


Catania, Gina 




367 


Ciccarelli, Nicki 


279 


Coomes, Rachel 


371 


Catlett, S. 




328 


Ciesla, Donna 


371 


Coon, Tari 


371 


Catsaros, Anthony 




367 


Ciesla, Elizabeth 


371 


Cooper, David 


371 


Caudle, Shirley 




367 


Ciesla, Greg 


371 


Cooper, Jamie 


279, 371 


Caughey, C. 




245 


Cieslak, J. 


244 


Cooper, Lisa 


296 


Cavaney, Ed 




284 


Cieslo, Greg 


299 


Cooper, Paige 


183 


Cavey, J. 




249 


Cirks, Starr 


410 


Cooper, Paul 


299 


Caywood, A. 




263 


Cirrincione, Julie 


271,335 


Cooper, Steven 


126 


Cazan, D. 




258 


Cison, Scott 


347 


Cope, Bruce 


284 


Cazel, J. 




328 


Ciszewski, Steven 


340, 371 


Corbett, Bethany 


255 


Cecchini, Donna 


371 


421 


Clagg, Rowdy 


421 


Corbett, Carmel 


190, 192, 227 


Cedergreen, Jacob 




371 


Clapper, J. 


247 


Cordero, Rosette 


345 


Cederoth, Meg 




23 


Clark, Amy 


285 


Corey, Cindy 


239 


Cenrlivre, Brent 


291 


371 


Clark, Chad 


198 


Corn, Stephanie 


236 


Cerny, A. 




273 


Clark, Mike 


286 


Cornerio, Tony 


297 


Cerny, L. 




247 


Clark, Shelly 


173 


Corrado, K. 


257 


Cetera, Mike 


312 


330 


Clark, Sunne 


367 


Corrigan, Karen 


78.255 


Cha, Eric 




291 


Clark, Thomas 


243 


Correz, Jamie 


266 


Cha, Kaison 




291 


Clarke, A. 


258 


Cosme, Jill 


371 


Chaiket, Tham 




371 


Clarke, Jerry 


252 


Cote, Krisren 


285 


Chakrabarri, Debasish 


328 


371 


Clarkson, Kim 


371 


Cotner, Joseph 


371 


Chakrabarti, Prabal 


146 


320 


Clayton, Marthew 


371 


Corner, Rick 


291 


Chalcraff, J. 




263 


Clayton, S. 


258 


Cottom, C. 


247 


Challos, Courtney 




312 


Cleary, Patrick 


340 


Cottom, Portland 


371 


Chamberlain, Eric 




326 


Clemens, Scorr 


291 


Cottone, Bari 


261 


Chamberlyn, Connie 




341 


Clendenin, J.T. 


280 


Counce, Robert 


371 


Chambers, L. 




247 


Clendenin, K. 


258 


Counte, Mike 


251 


Chambers, Lana 




341 


Cler, Michelle 


371 


Courson, Thomas 


237, 320, 372 


Chambers, Laura 




351 


Clinch, Scott 


371 


Courrney, Jerry 


313 


Chamcharus, Jamarie 




326 


Cline, L. 


269 


Coutant, J. 


263 


Chamura, Tony 




266 


Clingan, Krissy 


279 


Couwels, Scott 


372 


Chan, Edward 




371 


Clinton, Anita 


176 


Covert, Catherine 


372 


Chan, Julie 




265 


Clinton, Hillary Rodham 


16, 17 


Cowden, Ken 


266 


Chandarana, Andy 




281 


Clisham, Mary Beth 


216 


Cowles, Jason 


304 


Chandarana, Seema 


250 


328 


Cloney, Jennifer 


344 


Cox, Jen 


265, 279, 346 


Chandrashekar, Lavanya 




281 


Cloos, Mary 


359 


Cox, Karen 


285 


Chanenson, Genna 




239 


Clough, H. 


273 


Cox, Mick 


338 


Chang, Alyssa 




371 


Clow, K. 


257 


Crafron, Kiersten 


334, 372 


Chang, Cecilia 310,326,342 


Cobo, Frank 


340 


Craig, Rachel 


372 


Chang, Dar-lon 




327 


Cobulski, Julia 


371 


Crain, Roberr 


372 


Chang, Diana 


265 


321 


Cochran, Christie 


204, 230 


Cramer, Chrisrine 


281 


Chang, Eddie 




251 


Cochran, Jason 


371 


Crane, Lynn 


216 


Chang, Fred 




371 


Cochran, Tim 


243 


Craven, D. 


245 


Chang, Grace 




371 


Coddington, Nancy 


371 


Crawford, C. 


247 


Chang, Mi 




371 


Coen, Alison 


236, 371 


Crawford, Carrie 


335 


Chang, P. 




245 


Coffey, Joel 


333 


Crawford, Chris 


243, 252 


Chapman, Courtney 




279 


Coffey, Mark 


305 


Crawford, Christoph 


er 372 


Chapman, Eric 




371 


Coffman, Amy 


285 


Crawford, Craig 


252 


Chapman, H. 




263 


Cohen, Aaron 


290 


Crawford, Ken 


224 


Chapman, N. 




249 


Cohen, Adam 


101 


Crawford, Nikki 


236, 288 


Chappell, Jon 




291 


Cohen, Barry 


333 


Crawford, Susan 


230 


Chappie, Adam 




293 


Cohen, Debbie 


239 


Creech, John 


98 


Charland, Karen 




371 


Cohen, Greg 


290 


Cremens, Matthew 


« 372 


Chase, J. 




273 


Cohen, Heath 


290 


Creswell, Cassie 


338 


Chase, S. 




247 


Cohen, Jared 


290 


Crews, C. 


247 


Chatwell, Matt 




362 


Cohen, Marcy 


239 


Criner, Tandy 


321 


Chaudhari, Preeti 




371 


Cohen, Miriam 


261 


Croegaerr, Jan 


255, 332 


Chaudhary, Adirya 




287 


Cohen, Ron 


290 


Croegaerr, Julie 


255, 372 


Chavez, P. 




257 


Cohen, Samantha 


261 


Croft, Eric 


253, 333 


Checca, Carey 




343 


Cohen, Sheryl 


371 


Cross, K. 


259 


Chen, Ching-Pying 




371 


Cohen, Valerie 


261 


Crowley, Lori 


257 


Chen, Herbert 


299 


,371 


Coke, Laverne 


323 


Crump, Jennifer 257 


339, 350, 372 



police. So began what many have called the most famous 
murder case in American history. 

Martina Navratilova retired after her 22nd appearance 
at Wimbledon. 

June 17 




The World Cup Soccer Tournament opened in the 
United States in 9 cities across the country. As the host 
countiy, the U.S. soccer team automatically qualified for 
the 24-team tournament. Brazil was able to stop Italy to 
win the World Cup, soccer's ultimate prize. Brazilian 
goalkeeper Claudio Taffarel knocked out Daniele Massaro's 
shot in the penalty kick tiebreaker to set the stage for 
Brazil's victory - Brazil's fourth world title. 

June 18 

The presidents of North and South Korea agreed to 
a summit to discuss the nuclear program of North Korea. 
Former President Carter negotiated these talks, and the 
conference was scheduled to begin on July 25, but it was 
postponed due to the death of the North Korean leader. 
Kim II Sung, long-time ruler of Korea, died of a heart attack 
on July 9, 1994, and his son, Kim Jung 11, took over as ruler. 

June 20 

Members of the United Auto Workers union de- 
clared a strike against Caterpillar. More than 13,000 
workers in Peoria, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Colorado 
went on strike in order to obtain better working 
conditions and improved compensation. 

June 30 

The U.S. Figure Skating Association took the 1994 
Figure Skating Championship away from Tonya Harding. 
Harding pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy in the 
assault of fellow skater Nancy Kerrigan in January of 1994. 

June 31 

California state supreme court upheld a ruling stating 
that RJ Reynolds Tobacco Co. could be sued for promoting 
the sale of cigarettes to minors. 



Index/Timeline 435 



YEAR OF 




July 1994 

July 2 

Andres Escobar, a soccer player for Columbia, was 
murdered because he accidently scored a goal for the 
opponents during the World Cup tournament. 

July 3 

37 people died in car accidents on Texas high- 
ways. 

July 6 




Fourteen firefighters died in Glenwood Springs, 
Colo., when wind caused the fire to surround them. 
High temperatures and dry conditions created the 
forest fires through 11 states. Tens of thousands of 
firefighters fought a summer-long battle against scores 
of fires that burned more than three million acres of 
woodland across the parched Western states. So 
many young people were fighting fires in Idaho by 
late August that state colleges allowed preregistered 
students to return to classes as much as three weeks 
late. Flames scorched a range of 
well-known locations, including the Jackson Hole 
ski valley and western Wyoming's Grand Teton 
National Park. 



436 Index/Timeline 



Crumpton, Robert 


156 


159 


DeChrisropher, Barbara J. 


242 


Dolliger, M. 


Crusius, Jeff 


241 


372 


Decker, R. 




328 


Dollman, Cindy 


Crusius, Julia 




273 


DeCoursey, Jan 




372 


Donahue, Kelly 


Cruz, David 




95 


Deelsnyder, Craig 




372 


Donahue, S. 


Cruz, Mundo 




246 


DeFily, Patry 




279 


Donnelly, Amanda 


Cuasay, Jennifer 52, 71 


333 


372 


DeFranco, S. 




258 


Donoghue, Marge 


Cuchra, Craig 




281 


Degroar, Daniel 




372 


Dooley, Brian 


Culberson, Brian 




372 


DeHaan, Cynrhia 


255 


372 


Dooley, M. 


Cull, Ian 




280 


DeHaan, Jason 




114 


Doolin, Amanda 


Cull, T. 




258 


DeHaan, Laure 




279 


Doolin, Jonathan 


Cullerton, Dan 




284 


Dekoj, Michelle 




279 


Doran, Barbara 


Cullinan, Patrick 




372 


Delacruz, RJ 




293 


Doran, Craig 


Culumber, Andrea 




326 


Delaespriella, Ana 




372 


Dore, Maureen 


Cummings, Kimberly 


236 


372 


Delaney, A. 




273 


Dorfman, Michael 


Cuningham, B. 




245 


DeLaTorre, Dawn 




271 


Dorfman, Shelby 


Cunnigham, Keith 




243 


DeLeon, Bridgecre 




265 


Dorighi, J. 


Curio, J. 




249 


DeLeon, Kary 


37 


285 


Dorn, Dave 


Currey, Steve 




243 


DeLeonardis, Mike 




280 


Dorner, Steve 


Currie, Sheila 


296, 372 


Delgado, Annette 




372 


Dorr, Ann 


Curry, James 




281 


Delheimer, Kristi 




341 


Dorsey, Colleen 


Curry, Tyanika 




372 


Delia, S. 




249 


Dossey, Doug 


Curson, S. 




263 


Dell, Chris 




304 


Dotterer, Brian 


Curtis, Melissa 


258 


372 


Dellavalle, Jeremy 




372 


Doucha, H. 


Curtis, Michael 




280 


Dellinger, Tim 




84 


Doud, J. 


Curtis, Nathan 




372 


DeMarco, Joe 


315 


340 


Doughney, J. 


Curulewshi, Jamie 




335 


Demaster, Jonathan 




372 


Douglas, Liz 


Curvey, Margaret 245 


339 


,346 


Demay, Jen 




236 


Douglas, Matthew 


Cusak, Mike 




241 


Demay, Jennifer 




372 


Douglas, Mike 


Cutri, Gianni 




326 


DeMello, K. 




247 


Douthard, Ty 


Cuvala, M. 




259 


DeMeyer, Sarah 258 


316,339 


,372 


Dovalovsky, Jason 


Cvengros, Mark 




372 


Demirdjian, John 




267 


Dove, Jason 


Cywinski, S. 




257 


Dempsey, K. 




259 


Downes, Emily 


Czajkowski, Beth 




250 


Denardo, Robert 




372 


Downs, C. 


Czarnowski, Amy 




372 


Dendrinos, Jen 




265 


Doyle, E. 


Czech, Dave 




304 


Denen, C. 




328 


Drach, Julie 


Czech, Jennifer 




372 


Denenberg, Jill 




261 


Draganchuk, Lisa 


Czech, Nicole M. 




242 


Denison, Kristen 




372 


Drager, Lane 


Czhakowski, John 




100 


Dennem, Chad 




207 


Dragic, Peter 


Czop, Cynthia 38 


345 

r 


,372 


Denning, P. 
Dennis, Leticia 
Dennis, Matthew 
Dennis, Meiany 
Dennor, Jill 
Densmore, E. 
Denton, Heather 
Denton, Mark 
Deobler, Lynn 
Deolt, Rex 




257 
189 
372 
372 
372 
328 
341 
297 
351 
372 


Drain, Stephanie 
Drain, Theodore 
Drake, A. 
Drake, Muffy 
Draney, Walt 
Drazin, Mike 
Drenth, Mike 
Drever, Don 
Drew, Jennifer 
Drew, Tricia 


D Alessandro, Anna Mark 




353 


Deopere, D. 




247 


Drews, Doreen 


D'Arco, Rob 




291 


Derar, Arda 




372 


Drews, S. 


Dabisch, Joel 




372 


Derdzinski, Sue 


247, 372 


Drews, Sharon 


Dabler, Vicki 




265 


Dervin, Eva 


343 


,372 


Dribin, David 


Dadiomov, Vadim 




335 


Deryke, Rebbecca 




285 


Dries, K 


Dailey, Bo 




195 


Desai, Sima 


326, 345 


Driesner, Stefan 


Daily, Beth 




250 


Desai, Sonia 


341 


,372 


Drinan, Dave 


Daily, Jeremy 




302 


Desmond, B. 




244 


Drost, Jennifer M. 


Daino, Terri 




281 


Desousa, Paul 




372 


Drubin, Ramey 


Dale, Doug 




329 


Deters, Brian 


207 


,372 


Drucker, Jori 


Dale, Sherri 




71 


Detmer, Jean 




372 


Dubey, M. 


Daley, Jenny 


33 


,245 


Deuter, Dan 




246 


DuBrock, Mark 


Daley, Matt 




304 


DeVar, Marc 


267 


,295 


Ducek, Klaudia 


Daley, Pat 




304 


Deveaux, Paul 




284 


DuClos, B. 


Dalton, Heidi 




341 


Dever, Amy 




372 


Duclos, Jennifer 


Daly, Carolyn 




372 


DeVerger, Brian 




305 


DuClos. W. 


Daly, Karen 


259, 37 


Devolder, Carolyn 




345 


Dudly, Alison 


DamhofT, T. 




273 


DeVore, Chris 


198 


, 199 


Duecker, James 


Damitz, Eric 




372 


Dewa, Michelle 




341 


Duensing, Dave 


Daniels, Keith 




372 


Dewey, J. 




269 


Duesterhaus, Stacie 


Danko, C. 




245 


Dewill, Eric 




267 


Duffield, Colin 


Dankowski, Eric 




299 


Dewitt, C. 




244 


Duffield, Michelle 


Danneggar, Brad 




299 


Deyatmond, Constance 


373 


Duffy, Brian 


Dannenfeldt, Matt 




293 


Deysher, Jenna 


344, 351 


,396 


Duffy, Maggie 


Dant, Traci 




333 


Diamant, Daniela 




144 


Duffy, Sreven 


Daram, Gopi 




321 


Diamond, Wendy 




239 


Duhig, Maureen 


Dare, Mike 




238 


Dickinson, John 




237 


Duin, Jill 


Darkins, Chris 




157 


Dieckman, Therron 




238 


Duitsman, K. 


Darter, Mike 




342 


Dieden, Joshua 




373 


Duke, Shelby 


Das, Shoma 




321 


Diehl, Emily 




236 


DuMoulin, Adam 


Dausman, Amy 




372 


Dietrich, Pauline 




285 


Dumser, Karen 


DaValle, M. 




260 


Dierzler, R. 




263 


Dunbar, Jennifer 


Davenport, N. 




245 


Digiovine, Carmen 




373 


Dunbar, Tresa 


Davey, Rich 




302 


Dilger, Ken 


154,228 


Duncan, Matthew 


Davey, Tim 




243 


Dill, Marchoe 




176 


Duncan, Scott 


Davidow, Seth 




180 


Dillon, Doug 




267 


Dunham, Katherine 


Davila, Deisy 




335 


Dimmick, Jim 




299 


Dunkel, A. 


Davis, Amanda 




250 


Dimock, Melissa 




373 


Dunn, Alex 


Davis, C. 




249 


Dinneen, Darrik 




267 


Dunn, Amelia 


Davis, Craig 




243 


Dintelmann, Laurel 




242 


Dunn, Jonathan 


Davis, Heather 




265 


Dioguardi, Paul 




243 


Dunn, Laura 


Davis, Jennifer 




372 


Dirks, Matt 




10 


Dunn, M. 


Davis, Jennifer A. 




242 


Ditmars, Dave 




243 


Dunn, Tracey 


Davis, Julia 


351 


,372 


Ditmars, Pete 




291 


Dunning, Jeffrey 


Davis, Randel 




372 


Diune, Victor 




373 


Dunphy, K 


Davis, Rich 




372 


Divane, Patty 




340 


Dunton, S. 


Davis, Ryan 




372 


Dixon, Renaldo 


323 


,333 


Duong, Phuong 


Day, Andrew 




372 


Dixon, Timothy 




373 


Dupont, Brad 


Day, Christy 




372 


Dizon, Michael 


312, 330 


,373 


Dupps, Kristina 


Day, J. 




259 


Do, Meera 




373 


Duquaine, Paul 


Dayon, June 




92 


Dobecki, Laura 




344 


Durante, Karen 


De La Cruz, Maria 




296 


Doberman, Howard 




145 


Duray, Bryan 


Deal, T. 




244 


Doberstein, Craig 




246 


Durbin, Jenel 


Deacon, Tim 




179 


Dockery, R. 




245 


Durham, C. 


Debatin, Brian 




251 


Docnitz, Tom 




305 


Durham, Sandy 


Debarin, Lyn 


245 


,340 


Dodson, Colleen 




373 


Durkin, A. 


Debarin, Mary 




372 


Doehring, Amy 




250 


Durkin, L. 


Debb, Bill 




251 


Doench, Steve 




304 


Durkin, Mandy 


Debrower, Gwendolyn27 1,322, 372 


Dohman, Bryan 




373 


Durlacher, Lindsey 


DeBruin, Jessica 258, 310 


320 


,328 


Dolenc, Matej 




252 


Duss, Danielle 


Debruler, C. 




273 


Dolezal, Sarah 


326, 327 


345 


Duttsman, Kristin 


Dec, William 




372 


Doll, Amy 




341 


Duval, Michelle 



302, 



Duzan, Jason 


237, 320, 374 


Erickson, Joan 




142 


Ferrall, Shana 


279 


,374 


Dykstra, Amy 


242, 321 


Erickson, Robert 




374 


Ferrer, Heidi 


340, 374 


Dykstra, Ray 


252 


Erikson, Mark 




207 


Ferro, Mark 




299 


Dysico, Gilbert 


108,241 


Erke, Henoc 




345 


Ferry, Kristen 




285 


Dzan, Tricia 


265 


Erlich, Josh 




280 


Ferry, Kristin 




374 


Dziedzac, Dave 


19 


Ernst, Benjamin 


302, 342 


374 


Fesi, C. 




258 






Ernst, Chris 




243 


Fester, Ellen 




281 






Ernsting-Gargano, Melanie242 


374 


Fetro, Cherie 




265 






Errandi, Jody 




374 


Fetter, Rochelle 




239 






Escobar, James 


266 


374 


Fetzer, April 


269, 37 i 






Esenler, Bora 


206 


207 


Feucht, D. 




260 






Esko, Ryan 




246 


Fialko, Inna 


339, 374 






Esmond, Heather 


273 


374 


Fick, J. 




258 






Espedido, Lucila 




332 


Fidler, Monica 


255, 329, 37 






Esposito, Mike 




281 


Fienberg, Josh 




375 


Eades, Brian 


299 


Essick, Ray 




415 


Fierz, Justin 




293 


Eads, Susan 


338, 374 


Estacio, K. 




257 


Figura, Jim 




284 


Eaton, L. 


257 


Estell, Carey 




250 


File, Shani 




341 


Eberle, Jill 


374 


Esworthy, Jennifer 


255 


332 


Filip, Felicia 




351 


Ebert, Roman 


246 


Evans, Angela 


370, 374 


Filliung, Victoria 




375 


Ebert, S. 


247 


Evans, C. 




244 


Fimmen, Kristen 


271 


,375 


Ebmeier, C. 


249 


Evans, Erin 


314.315 


Fimmen, L. 




260 


Eby, Brian 


280 


Evans, H. 




257 


Finch, Craig 




343 


Eby, K. 


247 


Evans, Lynsy 




279 


Findley, Narochewa 




343 


Eck, Julie 


374 


Evans, Ryan 




304 


Fine, Amy 




239 


Eck, Scott 


374 


Evans, Wendy 


317 


374 


Finkle, Marc 




299 


Eckart, George 


312 


Evenson, Erin 




344 


Finlayson, Abbie 




343 


Eckburg, David 


214 


Evernham, Kevin 




303 


Finley, Anne 




362 


EckJund, Erica D. 


242 


Evert, Michele 




374 


Finn, M. 




244 


Ecklund, Stephanie 


242, 374 


Ewen, Jennifer 




281 


Finnamore, Ryan 




266 


Economopoulos, Chrysoula257, 373 


Ewolt, Jerry 




252 


Finnegan, Joy 


279 


,321 


Eddie, Toinette 


374 


Eyman, Lynn 




255 


Fiorello, Michelle 




285 


Eden, Blain 


238 








Fischer, C. 




259 


Eden, Josh 


281 








Fischer, Jocelyn 




239 


Eder, Kristin 326, 


327, 345, 374 


y^ 


mmm 


< 


Fischer, Lisa 




375 


Edgar, Jim 


44, 103 


/) 


S" 




Fischer, S. 




247 


Edidin, Mindy 


245, 295 


( J A 


£_ 




Fisher, K. 




245 


Edmonson, Jenn 


279 


/Ji 


^ 




Fisher, Lisa 




236 


Edward, Tom 


302 


M M 






Fisher, Matt 




252 


Edwards, A. 


263 


*^S 






Fisher, Rene L. 




242 


Edwards, Jason 


374 








Fisk, Betsy 




250 


Edwards, Jeremy 


253 


Fabbre, Jody 




265 


Fisz, Ari 




375 


Edwards, Julie 


164, 167,228 


Fabian, Josh 




231 


Fitch, Kevin 




304 


Edwards, S. 


257 


Fadden, T. 




244 


Fitcanto, S 




258 


Eggan, Kevin 


251 


Fahlen, Krisren 




239 


Fitzgerald, Meggan 


259 


,326 


Eggerichs, C. 


244 


Faigen, Norah 


244 


374 


Fitzgerald, Shannon 




239 


Eggleston, Latrice 


374 


Fair, J. 




259 


Fitzgibbon, M. 




257 


Eggstaff, Justin 


267 


Fairbanks, Jamie 




210 


Fitzmaurice, Cary 




375 


Egonmwan, Kimberly 


343 


Faivre, Per 




251 


Fitzpatrick, John 


281 


,375 


Ehernhofer, Heidi 


340 


Faklaris, Cori 




312 


Fitzpatrick, Kevin 




375 


Ehlenfeldt, Joy 


230 


Falconer, Amy 




236 


Flach, Ryan 




280 


Ehlers, Matt 


293 


Falese, A. 




257 


Flaig, Jen 




239 


Ehmann, Bridget 


236 


Fallek, C. 




245 


Flamm, Sharolyn 




255 


Eichen, Rodney 


329 


Fallen, Terry 


221 


291 


Flanagan, Matt 




284 


Eigner, N. 


249 


Famatid, Rommel 




321 


Fleck, Kevin 




243 


Eihuses, Jeanette 


374 


Fan, V. 




247 


Fleming, K. 




245 


Eisenmenger, Dana 


374 


Farahvar, Paul 




285 


Fleming, Mia 




375 


Eisner, Anna 


239 


Farber, Adam 




252 


Flennet, Chris 




241 


Ekdal, K. 


259 


Farber, Samantha 


273 


374 


Flewelling, Janet 


259 


,351 


Ekl.T. 


249 


Faris, Jen 




279 


Flickinger, Dean 




266 


El-Barbarawi, Nadia 


250 


Farley, Kathleen 


259 


374 


Fliss, Michelle 




279 


Elarde, Joe 


140,287 


Farley, Matt 




297 


Flomenhoft, Michelle 




375 


Elder, Jennifer 


374 


Farlow, Sharon 




312 


Flood, Mike 




251 


Eldridge, David 


339, 374 


Farmer, Angela 




340 


Florence, Trevelyn 




343 


Eliashevsky, Chrysryna 353, 374 


Farney, Caitlin 


242 


374 


Flores, Brian 




284 


Eliashevsky, Chrysryna M. 242 


Farney, Sarah 




374 


Flores, C. 




273 


Elijah, Dina 


223, 250 


Farnum, Marshall 




243 


Flores, Desi 




375 


Elkahatib, Raed 


97 


Farr, Sarah 




312 


Flores, Fabiola 




296 


Elkins, Paulina 


321 


Farrar, Kelli 




216 


Flores, Juan 




375 


Ellingson, Rebecca 


374 


Farrel, Amanda 




236 


Flowers, A. 




263 


Ellington, Sarah 


265 


Farrell, L. 




328 


Flowers, Niki 




341 


Elliott, Nancy 


313 


Farrell, Lisa 




374 


Floyd, Stuart 




375 


Elliott, S. 


273 


Farrell, Megan 




250 


Flynn, A. 




259 


Elliott, Tim 


266 


Farrell, Rhett 




253 


Flynn, Adrianne 




296 


Ellis, Geoff 


29, 340 


Farrell, Scort 




374 


Flynn, B. 




249 


Ellis, J. 


247 


Farwell, Ed 




323 


Flynn, J. 


247 


,249 


Ellis, Sandra 


374 


Fashola, Ray 




321 


Flynn, Jennifer 


310 


,350 


Ellish, Jeff 


299 


Fask, Sreve 




374 


Foersom, Tim 




297 


Ellison, Shannon 


374 


Faulkner, Brian 




291 


Foerster, Eric 




375 


Elmore, Elizabeth 


335 


Faulkner, Gretchen 




323 


Foerster, Stephanie 




375 


Elsenpeter, Joni 


359 


Faulkner, Mark 




291 


Fogarty, Brian 




238 


Eisner, D. 


245 


Fawer, Teresa 




374 


Foley, Angela 


259 


,375 


Elvidge, Melinda 


255,316,421 


Fay, Danaka 




374 


Foley, Jennifer 




375 


Elwood, Matt 


286 


Fay, Derik 


115 


267 


Foley, L. 




328 


Emaci, Edward 


340, 374 


Feeney, Megan 263, 


307, 339 


374 


Foley, Lisa Mansuero 




353 


Emery, Kevin 


286 


Fehr, Laurie 


329 


374 


Foley, Mike 




332 


Emrich, Dan 


304 


Fehrenbacher, Jessica 




255 


Foley, Shane 




299 


Eng, Waymong 


421 


Feibish, Natalie 




374 


Foley, Tom 




237 


Engel, Ryan 


290 


Feist, Valerie 




374 


Folk, Amanda 




341 


Engelhardt, Jenifer 


340 


Feld, Brian 




374 


Foncannon, Michael 




333 


Engelke, Pamela 


374 


Feldbau, Shari 


261 


374 


Foote, Deangela 




375 


Engelmann, Anton 


246 


Feldheim, Rachel 




239 


Footlik, Rob 




290 


Engeln, R. 


258 


Feldman, Bradley 


340 


374 


Foppe, Paul 




353 


Enger, Jen 


250 


Feldman, Mandy 




27 


Ford, Kim 




281 


Enger, Molly 


255 


Feldman, Naomi 




374 


Forgy, Darren 




286 


England, Matthew 


302, 374 


Feldsien, Laura 




374 


Formanek, Vincent 




83 


Engleson, Jessie 


285 


Felled, Nicole 




374 


Forsythe, Kristine 




327 


English, Angela 


94 


Felver, K. 




245 


Fosnot, Tim 




375 


Enright, Andrea 


279 


Fen, E. 




257 


Foster, Brad 




326 


Enrique, Al 


284 


Fengel, Gayle 




374 


Foster, Greg 




243 


Ensminger, Christa 


265 


Fenley, H. 




249 


Foster, Joella247, 307, 328, 339, 375 


Ensor, Heather 


374 


Fenoglio, J. 




244 


Fosrer, Melissa 




189 


Enstrom, Jeff 


299 


Fenster, Scott 


280 


289 


Foster, Ryan 




266 


Episocokhan, Jamahl 


312 


Ferber, Shawn 




291 


Fote, K. 




244 


Epperson, Kim 


285 


Ferega, S. 




259 


Fox, Amy 




375 


Epstein, Uyse 


261 


Ferguson, Michael 




139 


Fox, Carolyn 


255 


,375 


Epstein, Jasmin 


261 


Ferlin, Jodi 




60 


Fox, Jeni 




265 


Epstein, Lilac 


281,323 


Fernandez, Elizabeth 




296 


Foxx, Matt 




243 


Erekson, L. 


258 


Fernandez, Vic 




267 


Frake, Aime 




326 


Erickson, Ben 


253 


Ferraiolo, Frank 


260 


374 


Frame, James 




375 



July 7 




Sixteen people died in Americus, Ga., where a 
record 21.1 inches of rainfall was reported. Two 
weeks of record flooding killed 31 people, de- 
stroyed hundreds of bridges and roads and even 
uprooted caskets from cemeteries. Tropical storm 
Albert dumped nearly two feet of rain, flooding the 
Flint and Ocmulgee rivers in the central and south- 
western sections of the states. About 35,000 people 
fled their homes, and more than 400,000 acres of 
crops were inundated after flooding began on July 5. 
Georgia officials reported hundreds of thousands of 
dollars in damage; 46 counties were declared na- 
tional disaster areas; and residents of Macon went 
without safe tap water for several weeks. Although 
the flood waters eventually abated, the hardships 
continued. State agricultural officials said it would 
be years before farmers recovered from damages 
including washed away top soil, washed out farm 
pond dams and damaged barns and other buildings. 

July 15 

Microsoft agreed to abondon some of its unfair 
sales practices due to an antitrust suit that was 
brought against it. The U.S. Justice Department had 
accused the company of stifling competition. 

A Navy board recommended the discharge of 
gay Lt. Tracy Thorne for his sexual orientation. 

July 19 

The U.S. Census Bureau announced that the 
number of children living with an unmarried parent 
has increased by 70 percent between the years 1983 
and 1993. 

The Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet crashed into Jupi- 
ter and created large fireshowers when approxi- 
mately 21 fragments from the comet entered Jupiter's 
atmosphere. The impacts caused obvious discolora- 
tions on the planet's surface which could be seen by 
astronomers across the country. 



Index/Timeline 437 




y I A YEAR OF 




July 1994 



July 20 




President Clinton ordered relief aid to the citizens 
of Rwanda who were experiencing an outbreak of 
cholera and dysentery. U.S. Army Engineers began 
pumping fresh water from Lake Kivu to the refugees. 
The civil war in Rwanda broke out on April 6 when a 
plane crash killed the president and ignited long- 
simmering tensions between the Hutu tribe and the 
Tutsi tribe. Before the year was over, 500,000 Rwandans 
had been killed and another 2 million had fled the 
African nation for the relative safety of squalid refugee 
camps in Zaire and other neighboring countries. 

July 22 

O.J. Simpson pleaded not guilty to the murder 
charges of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Gold- 
man. Simpson said that he was "absolutely 100% 
not guilty." 

Shannon Faulkner, 19, was admitted into the 
Citadel when a federal judge declared it was uncon- 
stitutional to exclude admittance based on gender. 
Faulkner had been accepted to the Citadel before the 
school realized she was not a male, and she was 
subsequently denied admittance. 

July 25 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel and King 
Hussein of Jordan signed a declaration in Washing- 
ton D.C., ending the state of war that had lasted 46 
years. The two nations had been enemies since the 
creation of Isreal in 1948 following a brief, bitter war 
between Jews and Arabs. President Bill Clinton 
mediated the talks and the leaders addressed Con- 
gress on July 26. 



Index/Timeline 



France, Mike 




304 


Garcia, Mark 




285 


Gilroy, J. 


24^ 


Francis, Darcy 




375 


Garcia, Melissa 




296 


Ginsberg, Skippy 


115 


Francour, Erik 


285 


328 


Garcia, Nancy 




375 


Girardi, Dawn 


242, 375 


Frank, Dan 




243 


Garcia, Omar 




375 


Gitles, Marci 


235 


Frank, Jason 


342, 37 ■ 


Gardner, Jenny 




375 


Giuis, Michael 


33: 


Frank, Jessica 




263 


Gardner, Lisa 




236 


Given, Karla 


275 


Frank, Kathryn 


249, 375 


Gardner, Marr 




280 


Given, Lori 


IT 


Frank, Matt 




284 


Gardner, Meg 




236 


Gladdin, Bill 


22) 


Frank, S. 




244 


Garfield, K. 




249 


Glaser, Carrie 


25C 


Frankel, Steve 




75 


Gargano, Melanie 




242 


Glaser, Laura 


76 


Frantilla, Carol 




314 


Gargas, Dave 




251 


Glaser, Paul 


375 


Frasca, Anthony 




267 


Garibay, Elizabeth 


245 


375 


Glass, Wibke 


375 


Frasca, Joe 




267 


Garr, Kim 




285 


Glassenberg, Brian 


280, 375 


Fraser, Timothy 




333 


Garret, Ayanna 


65,90 


Glastnapp, K. 


255 


Frasor, Katie 




279 


Garrett, Amy 




375 


Glazer, Evan 


295 


Frazer, Pamela 


271 


375 


Garrett, Christie 




249 


Gleason, Jim 


26C 


Frederick, Julie 


255 


310 


Garrett, Christine 




317 


Gleich, D. 


24< 


Frederiksen, Amy 


329, 375 


Garrett, Matthew 




375 


Gleich, Jen 


26= 


Freedom, Mission 




332 


Garrett, Nancy 




128 


Glen, Kevin 


303 


Freehill, Velda 




341 


Garris, Kiwane 




168 


Glenzinski, Tina 


28' 


Freehill, Whiteny 




351 


Garrision, A. 




244 


Gliwa, M. 


25' 


Freelain, Jamila 




375 


Garritano, Angela 


263 


391 


Glover, Jenny 


271 


Freels, Angela 




375 


Garrite, R. 




260 


Gluck, Mara 


261 


Freese, C. 




249 


Garson, Jen 




261 


Goben, Mart 260, 


310, 332, 35C 


Freiman, A. 




259 


Garton, Mark 




186 


Gochee, Jon 


375 


French, M. 




259 


Garwal, John 


321 


375 


Godar, Chris 


295 


Frese, B. 




263 


Garwood, Mark 




253 


Godfrey, Patrick 


305, 37S 


Frett, Amy 




285 


Gasiorowski, Dana 




236 


Godwin, Laura 


56, 375 


Freund, C. 




273 


Gassner, Jennifer 




375 


Goebel, Jodi 


341 


Freund, J. 




273 


Gastalt, Rachel 




375 


Goebel, Stacey 


375 


Frey, Jennifer 




375 


Gates, Kacey 




250 


Goeddel, Darrel 


287 


Frey, S. 




257 


Gatesm, Tom 




252 


Goeddel, T. 


25c 


Fricker, Chrissie 




250 


Gatilao, Yvette 




353 


Goel, Amir 


343 


Friedlander, Michael 




375 


Gattone, Frank 




246 


Goesel, Craig 


375 


Friedline, Cara 




279 


Gauger, Amy 




265 


Goetsch, Julie 


25C 


Friedman, Amy 




239 


Gault, J. 




244 


Goetz, A. 


245 


Friedman, Dana 




261 


Gaumer, M. 




269 


Goger, Gustav 


33: 


Friedman, Eric 




375 


Gaunt, Andrew 




299 


Gold, Neal 


28C 


Friese, Kim 




321 


Gavzer, Traci 




250 


Goldberg, Andrew 


333, 347 


Friesz, Shelley 




265 


Gazdic, Dan 




335 


Goldberg, Beth 


261 


Frigo, A. 




259 


Gazdik, Michelle 


236, 375 


Goldberg, Frannie 


235 


Frizzo, Lainee 




375 


Gaziano, Maria 


245 


,348 


Goldenberg, Esther 


39c 


Frodyma, M. 




269 


Gebrehiwet, Smret 




143 


Goldfadcr, Lindy 


235 


Froehlich, J. 




245 


Gee, Stanley 




333 


Goldfarb, Sarah R. 


245 


Frost, Maurissa 




285 


Geherna, Amy 




341 


Goldflies, Brittany 


261 


Frost, Mere 




285 


Gehring, Carrie 




255 


Goldman, Andy 


29C 


Froy, Ilyse 




239 


Gehrke, Kelly L. 




242 


Goldman, S. 


24; 


Frumkin, Simon 




375 


Gehrt, Trey 




340 


Goldman, Shoshana 


33^ 


Fudge, K. 




273 


Geissler, Steve 




299 


Goldsmith, Brady 


375 


Fulcher, Sylvester 




343 


Geistler, Gwendolyn 




341 


Goldstein, Jill 


23S 


Fuller, Bryce 


297, 340 


Gclder, Annika Van 




414 


Goldstein, Melanie 


262 


Fuller, Jessica 




375 


Gelino, Chris 




375 


Goldstein, Mike 


29C 


Fuller, Paul 


84, 335 


Geltz, Erika 




375 


Goldstein, Rachel 


23S 


Fung, Carrie 




353 


Genczo, Tracy 


351 


,379 


Goldstein, Robin 


26 t 


Fung, Lucy 




375 


Gentry, Geoffrey 




379 


Goldstein, Stacey 


235 


Funk, Peggy 


271 


,375 


Gentry, Kimberly 




379 


Gollan, Scott 


29) 


Fuoco, Charles 




375 


Genrry, Liz 




236 


Golod, Elina 


37 r 


Furfaro, Brad 




293 


Georgas, Jennifer 


339 


,379 


Golub, Lance 


321 


Furmanski, Tracy 




340 


George, Chris 




327 


Gomez, K. 


24 e 


Furry, Sam 




279 


George, Priya 




321 


Gomez, Oralia 


29( 








George, William 




370 


Gomric, J. 


2¥. 








Georgio, Ally 




271 


Gonzalez, Amy 


25t 


S — "^ 


• ■} 




Geppinger, A. 




258 


Gonzalez, Andrea 


245, 323 


( ^ 


J 




Geraci, Anne 




343 


Gonzalez, Arruro 


37 r 


K -^- 


*S 




Geraci, Sheryl 




379 


Gonzalez, Chris 


24^ 


\J§ 


r 




Gerald, K. 




269 


Gonzalez, T. 


25: 


m ^w 






Gerard, Don 




69 


Goode, David 


375 


*^S 






Gerbasi, Dan 


86,87 


,281 


Goodman, J. 


247 








Gerdes, Steven 




10 


Goodman, Lisa 


239 


Gabriel, Amy 




340 


Gerdes, T. 




273 


Goodman, M. 


257 


Gaddey. Heidi 


259,310 


Gerdes, Trista 




379 


Goodman, Michelle 


379 


Gadrinab, Joy 




353 


Gerencher, S. 




328 


Goodman, Sherri 


379 


Gaffner. Nancy 


311 


,375 


Gerhard, Steve 




207 


Goodnow, A. 


244 


Gaffney, Kevin 




375 


Gerlecki, Kevin 




302 


Goodpaster, Lisa 


379 


Gagliano, Jason 




285 


Gerleman, L. 




263 


Goodsell, Bradley 


379 


Gagiiano, L. 




249 


Gerrase, M. 




258 


Gordon, Ross 


280 


Gahlbeck, Amy 




255 


Gerry, T. 




258 


Gorfin, Eugene 


280 


Gaikowski, C. 




257 


Gershon, Joel 




291 


Gorman, J. 


257 


Gainer, M. 




259 


Gerstein, Kim 




261 


Gorny, K. 


273 


Gaines, Daniel 




375 


Gertsma, Jennifer C. 




242 


Gorski, Elizabeth 


258, 379 


Gainsberg, Vicki 




239 


Gervase, D. 




260 


Gorski, Marci 


236 


Galance, Jacques 


29C 


,328 


Gerwitz, Andrew 




379 


Gottheil, Fred 


69 


Galbuda, Billy 




293 


Getz, Karen 


279 


.328 


Gottlieb, Gina 


273, 320 


Gale, Lou 




342 


Ghere, Ryan 




285 


Gough, Ryan 


266 


Galitz, P. 




269 


Gherna, Amy 




379 


Gould. Heather 


239 


Gall, Bryan 




280 


Ghuman, Preetindar K. 




242 


Gould, Parrick 


379 


Gallagher, K. 




244 


Giacomazzi, J. 




258 


Gouls, Heather 


239 


Gallagher, Susan 




327 


Giamalva, Mark 




379 


Gove, Tim 


380 


Gallegos, Nick 




375 


Giannasi, Micheline 


249, 379 


Grabowski, L. 


245, 273 


Gallick, S. 




273 


Gibb, Laura 


271 


,335 


Grade, Heidi 


379 


GaJlimore, Hal 




287 


Gibbs, Philip 




117 


Gradman, Steve 


281,345 


Gallo, Elisa 




375 


Gibson, A. 




263 


Graf, Michael 


291,379 


Galvan, Parricia 




375 


Gibson, Chad 




284 


Graff, Chris 


379 


Galvez, Evangeline 


33S 


,375 


Gibson, Charles 




195 


Graff, Ryan 


210 


Galvin, Michael 




375 


Gibson, Claude 




379 


Graham, L. 


25" 


Gambhir, Snehil 




121 


Giebelhausen, Mike 




291 


Graham, Marr 


251 


Gambon, Renee 




229 


GifTen, Molly 




329 


Granacher, Teresa 


379 


Gamlin, Jeffrey 




375 


GifTord, Scott 




304 


Granata, Tracy 


340 


Gammill, Tamara 


257 


,375 


Gilbert, Carrie 


25C 


,379 


Granskog, Glen-Erik 


379 


Gandaylor, Janice 




281 


Gilbert, Christine 


257 


,335 


Grant. Erin 


351 


Gandhi, Karthi 




313 


Gilbert, Molly 




320 


Grant, Joe 


351 


Gange, Chrisropher 


338 


,375 


Gilberrson, S. 




258 


Grant, Kristin 


285 


Gannon, Michelle 




279 


Giles, Pete 




186 


Grant, Ladonna 


379 : 


Gansmann, Gina 




375 


Gilfand, Jeff 


29C 


,328 


Grant, Melissa 


250 


Garavaglia, A. 




263 


Gillespie, Tom 




75 


Granr. Ryan 


322 


Garceau, A. 




244 


Gillerr, Lisa 


316 


.341 


Grant, Samuel 


379 


Garcha, Bonny 




340 


Gillis, Michael 




347 


Grass, J. 


245 


Garcia, A. 




258 


Gilman, Beth 




279 


Grasso, Michelle 


250 



Grau, N. 




273 


Guzzino, T. 


257 


Harmon, J. 


263, 269 


Graves, Kathleen 


273 


379 






Harmon, Jacqueline 


382 


Gray, A. 




258 






Harms, Angie 


341 


Gray, John 




293 


/*^^f 


>o 


Harms, Annika 


259 


Gray, Juliann 




250 


( ry a 


SJ 


Harms, Evalina 


382 


Gray, L. 


245 


259 


^yj/A 


z/ 


Harms, Jody 


259 


Gray, Leanna 




379 


^wrw 


s~\ 


Harms, Johanna 


382 


Gray, M. 




244 


m <X f 


J 


Harms, Karyn 


259, 382 


Gray, Tiffany 




379 


K^S K^ 


/ 


Harnetiaux, Tiffany 


269, 382 


Graziano, Scott 




285 






Haro, Patricia 


382 


Grazulis, Vilija 




335 


Ha, Sunhae 


421 


Haro, Teresa 


383 


Grcevic, Tonya 




257 


Haacke, Angie 


265 


Haronik, Ann 


271 


Greeley. Bridget 


265 


379 


Haag, Brad 


333, 347 


Harpe, T. 


258 


Green, A. 




257 


Haag, Dawn 


236 


Harper, Kim 


236 


Green, Bob 




11 


Haaland, W. 


263 


Harper, Pamela 


383 


Green, Dorian 




195 


Haas, Dana 


382 


Harper, Rob 


329 


Green, Gavan 




252 


Habbley, A. 


257 


Harris, J. 


245 


Green, J. 




328 


Habel, Chris 


117 


Harris, Matthew 


383 


Green, Jeff 




252 


Haberichter, Eric 


302 


Harris, Michelle 


281 


Green, Tina273, 274, 276 


288 


307 


Habisohn, Kim 


249, 313 


Harris, Robin 


335 


Greenberg, Brad 




290 


Hacker, Michelle 


321 


Harris, Shenika 


39 


Greenberg, Laura 




239 


Hackect, K. 


249 


Harroun, J. 


257 


Greenblatr, Courtney 




271 


Hackett, Susan 


265 


Harry, M. 


258 


Greene, Leslie 




379 


Hackett, Tom 


251 


Harryman, Brooke 


383 


Greenman, Jennifer 


249 


379 


Hackler, Sarah 


203 


Harshbarger, Mike 


286 


Greenslade, H. 




259 


Hackmann, Fred 


251 


Hart, Amy J. 


242 


Greenwalt, Cheryl 




379 


Haefelin, B. 


273 


Hart, Doug 


186,285 


Greenwell, David 




379 


Haenisch, George 


280 


Hart, Sarah 


335 


Gregar, T. 




259 


Haenitsch, April 


271 


Hartford, Deborah 


383 


Gregg, A. 




269 


Haenle, Mark 


382 


Hartford, Josh 


362 


Gregg, Rachel 




265 


Haerr, Rudy 


382 


Hartman, Geoff 


291 


Gregory, Chris 




303 


Haevner, H. 


273 


Hartman, Scott 


299, 383 


Gregory, Jane 




285 


Haffey, Zach 


63 


Hartstock, Susan 


383 


Gregory, Ryan 




379 


Hafner, Ethan 


280 


Hartweg, Daniel 


383 


Greissinger, Kurt 




379 


Haggerty, C 


249 


Hartwig, Sarah 


383 


Grelecki, Kevin 


302 


379 


Hahm, Julie 


321 


Harry, L. 


244 


Grena, Julie 




265 


Hahn, B. 


245 


Harvey, Carrie A. 


242 


Gries, B.J. 




246 


Hahn, Brice 


303 


Harvey, Kelly 279 


307, 339, 383 


Grieve, Andy 


241 


340 


Haiges, Robin 


236 


Harvill, A. 


259 


Griffin, A. 




257 


Haimes, Shara 


239, 382 


Hasbani, Keren 


239 


Griffin, Andrea 


257 


379 


Hakoda, Hirolo 


118 


Haskell. Kim 


239 


Griffin, Christopher 


299 


379 


Hall, Andy 


332 


Hassell, B. 


249 


Griffin, Erin 




340 


Hall, Chryscal 


341 


Hasselman, Ty 


383 


Griffin, Felicia 




343 


Hall, Eric 


382 


Hatfield, S. 


245 


Grijnszrein, Dan 




280 


Hall, Grenita 


296 


Hathaway, Heather 


383 


Grim, Jeffrey 




114 


Hall, Jason 


243 


Hausen. Stephanie 


239, 383 


Grismer, Mathew 




379 


Hall, Jeff 


321 


Hauser, T. 


266 


Grisolano, J. 




273 


Hall, Jill 


261 


Havens, Darren 


253, 316, 339 


Grissett, Jessica 




311 


Hall, K. 


269 


Haverkamp, Amanda 


383 


Griswold, Matt 




340 


Hall, Michael 


342 


Havranek, Scott 


284 


Grode, K. 




273 


Hall, Nancy 


255 


Hawkens, John 


253 


Grogman, Sara 




379 


Hall, Ryan 


291 


Hawkins, Jen 


265 


Groner, Allen 


290 


310 


Hallam, Michelle 


367 


Hawkins, Tamara 


265, 383 


Groppel, Stephen 


326 


379 


Hallberg, Sara 


279 


Hawkinson, Ben 


253 


Grosball, A. 




273 


Halligan, K. 


244 


Hawkinson, Lisa 


263, 383 


Groselak, Jim 




281 


HaJper, Nick 


281 


Hayden, Trent 


383 


Gross, Ben 




322 


Halperin, Ben 


345 


Haye, Jeffrey 


302, 383 


Gross, Christy 




340 


Halrerson, T. 


258 


Haye, T. 


245 


Grossman, Dan 




285 


Halser, April 


279 


Hayek, Adam 


383 


Grossmann, Kimberly 




379 


Halstenberg, Stephanie 


259, 382 


Hayes, James Jr. 


336 


Grote, Brian 




241 


Ham, Steve 


321 


Hayes, Jen 


265 


Grotto, Karen 




379 


Hamburg, Lori 


367 


Hayjek, Jane 


236 


Grotto, L. 




273 


Hames, Stephen 


382 


Hays, Chad 


353 


Grotto, Matt 


312,314 


Hamil, Patricia 


351 


Hays, Ti 


285 


Groves, Laura 


273 


379 


Hamill, Teresa 


279, 382 


Hayum, Danielle 


261 


Growney, A. 




244 


Hamilton, Dave 


36 


Hazelwood, Leslie 


383 


Growney, Kim 




340 


Hamilton, Susan 


382 


Hazer, Lori 


257, 383 


Grubb, Mike 




251 


Hammel, Matt 


304 


Hazer, M. 


263 


Grundke, John 




379 


Hammersly, Debbie 


261 


Heal, Stephen 


383 


Gryzlo, Marc 




284 


Hammes, Beth 


250 


Healy, Megan 


383 


Grzeskowiak, Jeff 




252 


Hammes, Matt 


281 


Heap, Julie 


271 


Gschendtner, Sally 




334 


Hammond, Karl 


287 


Hearity, Rachel 


245, 383 


Gschiel, Beth 


259 


379 


Hammond, Kim 


269,316 


Hearn, L. 


257 


Gschwendtner, Sally 


259 


379 


Hampson, Theodore 


382 


Hearsley, L. 


257 


Guadalupe, Melody 


344 


379 


Hancock, Chris 


299 


Heather, Sean 


41 


Gubbins, K. 




247 


Hancock, James 


333 


Heaton, Alice 


351 


Gudeman, Dan 




253 


Hand, Ward 


302 


Hebreard, Jeff 


291.383 


Guenther, Grant 




266 


Handler, Lisa 


261 


Hecathorn, Scott 


383 


Guenther, R. 




249 


Handley, Doug 


241 


Hecimovich, J. 


263 


Guenther, Renec 


249 


379 


Handley, Eric 


243 


Heckman, Rebecca 


383 


Guerin, Jason 




266 


Haning, Carrie 


257 


Hector, Kevin 


252 


Guerin, Roger 




266 


Hanks, Matt 


281 


Hedborn, Jenifer 


236 


Guerra, Lisa 




351 


Hanna, Debbie 


285 


Hedin, Eloirt 


252 


Guerrera, John 




379 


Hanna, J. 


244 


Hedlund, Marc 


297 


Guerrero, Elizabeth 




379 


Hannaford, Julie 


131 


Heedum, D. 


244 


Gugnani, Sean 




303 


Hanness, Charlie 


246 


Heedum, J. 


244 


Guilliams, Kristen 




382 


Hannus, Amelia 258 


313,382 


Heeg, Melinda 


383 


Guleserian, Chris 




279 


Hansen, C. 


257 


Heeren, Greg 


281 


Guleserian, M. 




244 


Hansen, Michelle 


382 


Heery, Brian 


383 


Gullaksen, Dana 




382 


Hansen, Nicole 


382 


Heiberger, J. 


247 


Gulley, T. 




244 


Hansens, Douglas 


382 


Heidari, Sharz 


31 


Gunji, Kimiko 




118 


Hansmann, Will 


266 


Heide, Sheila 


255,321,383 


Gunji, Tricia 




119 


Hanson, Debbie 


255 


Heiden, Jason 


186 


Gunther, Earl 




382 


Harbison, Cary 


253, 382 


Heidorn, Diane 


321.339 


Guo, Connie 




321 


Hard, M. 


260 


Heiken, Renee 


317 


Gupta, Hika 




271 


Harden, Karon 


382 


Hein, Aaron 


284, 383 


Gupta, Mitun 




265 


Harder, Dave 


252 


Hein, Cory 


284 


Gupta, Ritu 




236 


Hardesty, Brent 


253 


Heine, E. 


245 


Gura, J. 




263 


Harding, Kevin 


304, 382 


Heintz, Billy 


293 


Gurnani, Payal 




340 


Hardy, J. 


257 


Heintz, Paul 


38 


Gurney, S. 




249 


Hardy, Kevinl54, 157, 160, 163,228 


Heinz, M. 


263 


Gustafson, A. 




328 


Hardy, S. 


244 


Heiser, Bryan 


383 


Gustafson, Amy 116, 236 


,321 


,382 


Haremza, Rebecca 247 


353, 382 


Heisinger, Andy 


266, 299 


Gustafson, Kristen 




382 


Harenza, K. 


245 


Heisner, Phil 


253 


Gustaveson, Jason 


260 


,382 


Harerkorn, Jude 


382 


Heitz, Kevin 


383 


Guy, Jim 




130 


Hargaren, Christopher 


382 


Heldman, Mark 


173 


Guzic, S. 




263 


Hargraves, A. 


257 


Heldt, Delane A. 


242 


Guzman, Greta 




75 


Harker, K. 


247 


Helfand, David 


280, 383 



July 29 

John Bayard Britton, a doctor who performed 
abortions, and his escort, James Barrett, were killed 
outside an abortion clinic in Pensacola, Fla., by a 
man supporting the pro-life movement. Paul Hill 
said that killing the doctor was a "justifiable homi- 
cide." Hill was charged with two counts of first 
degree murder. 

July 31 

The U.S. received authorization to invade Haiti 
from the United Nations. The U.S. intended to invade 
if the military government did not resign from power. 

August 1994 

August 1 

The Clinton administration ordered federal mar- 
shals to stand outside of several abortion clinics 
throughout the United States in order to protect the 
employees from pro-life extremists. 

August 11 




Major league baseball players went on strike to 
oppose the salary cap imposed by managers. On the 
34th day of the strike, the team owners cancelled the 
rest of the season, including the playoffs and the 
World Series. The strike caused 1994 to be the first 
time the public has been without a World Series 
since 1904. The strike continued into the 1995 
season as team owners and players were still unable 
to reach an agreement. 



Index/Timeline 439 



A YEAR OF 




August 1994 



August 12 




A concert was held in Saugerties, N.Y., to mark 
the 25th anniversary of Woodstock. The original 
Woodstock took place in Bethel, N.Y., in 1969. 
Promoters set up distant parking lots and shuttle 
buses for the 200,000 people who paid $135 each for 
tickets — advance sale only. About 350,000 people 
actually showed up for the event. Many ticket hold- 
ers could not find a parking space, and some walked 
up to 12 miles to get to the concert. Onstage 
appearances included Bob Dylan, Joe Cocker, Mel- 
issa Ethridge and Green Day. Heavy rain drenched 
the concert, leaving the grounds and the people 
mud covered. 

August 13 

North and South Korea reached an agreement 
when North Korea agreed to stop the production of 
nuclear weapons. 

August 17 

The American Home Products Corp. bought the 
American Cyanamide Co. in order to create one of 
the world's largest drug companies. 






440 Index/Timeline 



Heifer, Eric 




243 


Hladik, Dave 




287 


Hu, Karen 




38( 


Helfgot, Mike 




312 


Ho, Mary 




281 


Huang, Boyao 




38( 


Hellem, H. 




273 


Hobin, M. 




257 


Huang, Fred 




8c| 


Heller, Laura 




261 


Hodel, J. 




269 


Huang, Gerald 




321 


Hellyer, J. 




273 


Hodel, Jennifer 


341 


386 


Hubbard, Natalie 




29( 


Helm, Katherine 




383 


Hodge, Brian 




266 


Hubet, Devin 


184 


231 


Helms, Matt 


253, 346 


Hodger, L. 




273 


Hubet, Mike 




25;] 


Helphingstine, M. 




269 


Hodgson, M. 




247 


Hubnet, Nicole 




38( 


Hembrogh, Shawn 




341 


Hoekstta, Daniel 




386 


Huckstadt, Beverly 


279 


386 


Hemman, Mike 




238 


Hoerner, Garret 




285 


Huckstorf, H. 




247 


Hemsworth, Will 




251 


Hofbauer, J. 




257 


Hudson, Eric 




24 1 


Henderson, Valton 




88 


Hoferle, J. 




258 


Hudson, Kate 


83 


26: 


Hendrick, J. 




259 


Hoffer, Grerchen 




236 


Hudspeth, M. 




261 


Hendricks, A. 




249 


Hoffert, Mindy 


247 


386 


Hueckstaedt, Robert 




38C 


Hendricks, Chris 




286 


Hoffman, David 




386 


Huelsmann, Carol 




25' 


Hendricks, Jennifer 




383 


Hoffman, Jennifer 




386 


Huffman, Neil 




39( 


Hendricks, S. 




249 


Hoffman, Lori 




126 


Huffman, Shannon 


46,47 


24 = 


Hendricksen, R. 




249 


Hoffman, Mart 




280 


Hughes, Holly 




38( 


Hengsbach, H. 




273 


Hoffman, Michelle 


279 


386 


Hughes, Jim 




237 


Heniff, Michael 




383 


Hoffman, Mike 


237, 280 


339 


Hughes, Syreeta 




34; 


Hennenfent, Matt 




253 


Hoffman, Rich 




281 


Hughes, Tim 




241 


Henning, Catriese 




296 


Hoffman, Robert 




386 


Hui, Kathy 




27' : 


Henning, Heather 


258 


341 


Hofmann, Brian 




280 


Huizenga, Aaron 




29! 


Henningsen, B. 




244 


Hogan, John 




241 


Hulin, Mark 




28( 


Henricks, K. 




260 


Hogan, Joseph 




124 


Hulina, Holly 


245 


30C 


Henrickson, Kristin 




164 


Hoge, Mark 




237 


Hull, Andy 




251 


Henry, Mike 




280 


Hoheisel, Kristie 


222, 236 


Hull, Daren 




24; 


Henshaw, Jarrod 




383 


Hohimer, Garrett 




300 


Hull, Glenn 




2V 


Hensley, Chad 




253 


Hoke, John 




386 


Hull, Gregory 




580 


Henson, Eric 


195,21 


Holba, Janice 


279 


386 


Hulting, M. 




24" 


Henson, Lou 




173 


Holcomb, Kristy 


259 


386 


Huking, Paula 




2751 


Henwood, Kristen 




285 


Holcombe, Robett 


157 


161 


Humay, M. 




24m 


Herbert, Christopher 




383 


Holden, Matt 




302 


Huminik, Melissa 




2S1 


Herbst, C. 




258 


Holecek, John 


154 


163 


Hunihan, John 




2S; 


Hercik, Joel 




243 


Holland, Juliette 




271 


Hunt, Casey 




281. 


Herman, A. 




244 


Holland, Stephanie 




340 


Hunt, Kelly 


285 


334 


Herman, Jevon 




179 


Holle, Lynn 




386 


Hunt, Nicole 




2S< 


Herman, Karen 


261 


383 


Hollett, H. 




273 


Hunter, Anthony 


52 


38( 


Herman, Neelie 




279 


Holliday, K. 




249 


Huntington, Howard 




38( 


Herman, Stefanie 




279 


Hollis, Becky 


255 


316 


Huntington, Laura 




271 


Hermann, Douglas 




383 


Hollis, Mike 




266 


Huntington, Tad 




30 c 


Hermann, Michael 




383 


Hollis, Rebecca 


339 


386 


Hurlbut, Brandon 




35( 


Hernandez, A 




328 


Hollonbeck, Scott 




227 


Hurley, Kimberly 




38C 


Hernandez, Diana 




383 


Hollweck, Ftancis 




243 


Hurliman, Amy 258, 


339, 353 


. 38C 


Hernandez, Esteila 




138 


Hollywood, M. 




269 


Hurter, David 


291 


38C 


Hetnandez, Gabe 


305 


,335 


Holm, S. 




249 


Husak, Barbara 




38( 


Hernandez, Mona 


242 


,383 


Holmes, A. 




257 


Huske, Mark 




24C 


Hernandez, Teresa 




383 


Holmes, Carissa 


257 


386 


Huskey, J. 




24' 


Herren, Heathet 




383 


Holmes, Kevin 




373 


Hustedt, Kristina 




38( 


Hetrera, Gil 




305 


Holmquist, Mike 




303 


Huston, Andrea 




28 c 


Hertzman, Stephanie 




239 


Holocek, John 




228 


Huston, Matt 




24; 


Herzog, Erik 




299 


Holpet, M. 




257 


Hutchason, Holly 




W 


Herzog, Sally 




285 


Holtz, Nic 




302 


Hutchins, Patrick 




241 


Heskin, John 




281 


Holtzman, Rachel 




239 


Hurchinson, Marthev, 




38( 


Hess, Blake 




299 


Holz, Jennifer 




386 


Hutchinson. Paul 


65,90 


Hesser, John-Charles 




383 


Holzmacher, Ryan 




266 


Hutchison, Jason 




241 


Hessman, Julie 




383 


Homan, Erik 


284, 386 


Huth, Kim J. 




242 


Hester, Jerry 




170 


Homan, J. 




263 


Hutton, E. 




249 


Herzer, Kim 




255 


Homoly, Casey 




285 


Huy, Larry 




386 


Heuberger, Brad 




280 


Hondros, Elaine 




265 


Huyear, Joanna 


273 


, 38( 


Heuberger, David 




280 


Hong, Dave 




246 


Huzinec, Mike 




28 = 


Heustis, Hilary 




271 


Hong, Joon 




123 


Hwang, Ryan 




38c 


Hew, Daniel 




383 


Hongaoshavalit, Pong 


285 


Hyett, K. 




24' 


Heyen, Jon 


237,316 


Honigschmidt, L. 




273 


Hynes, Karen 




35^ 


Heyen. Karen 


249 


,383 


Hoobler, J. 




249 


Hysell, A. 




255 


Hickey, Elizabeth 




341 


Hood, Kyle 


328 


,386 


Hyun, Aerin 




38i 


Hickey, Julie 




271 


Hood, Nathan 


274 


,284 








Hickey, M. 




263 


Hoogeweif, Gerrit 




386 








Hicks, Andy 




383 


Hook, A. 




259 


>*^ 


**f 




Higgins, Ed 




297 


Hook, Jeff 




327 


^7 


v 




Hilb, Jenny 




239 


Hoon, Bryan 




386 


( J A 


f 




Hiler, Tammy 




341 


Hoos, Jason 




386 


^J 


f 




Hill, Amy 




285 


Hoovel, Brett 




285 


- M 






Hill, Brian 




383 


Hopkins, Donna 




386 


*^S 






Hill, Carrie 




383 


Hopkins, Lisa 




321 








Hill, Christopher 


281 


,383 


Hopp, Steven 




386 


Iammartino, M. 




328 


Hill, Janet 




383 


Hoppe, Jenny 




279 


Ibendahl, Steve 




286 


Hill, L. 




257 


Hotsely, Alison 




236 


Ibis, Meryl 




351 


Hill, Lauren 


257, 3S 


Horstman, Craig 




284 


Icewicz, Lisa 




386 


Hill, Lori 




285 


Horstman, Mike 




281 


Igaravidez, Dave 




305 


Hill, Raven 




312 


Horton, Jennifer 




212 


Iida, Kasumi 


327 


386 


Hill, Shawn 




280 


Horvath, Jason 




302 


Ikedo, Nao 




164 


Hill. Tamekia 




143 


Horwitz, Barbara 




386 


Ikenberry, Judith 


10,45 


Hill, Wendy 


244 


,383 


Horwitz, Debbie 




261 


Ikenberry, Stanley 


10, 13,44,45; 


Hiller, Eric 


326, 339 


,383 


Horwitz, Robyn 




261 


Imbery, Lecia 




250 


Hillhouse, Angela 




383 


Hoss, Dotinne 


245 


,386 


Imhoff, Bryan 




303 


Hillman, Jeff 




383 


Hostert, Eric 




386 


Imm, Phil 




207 


Hillman, Stacy 




261 


Hotatd, Justine 




343 


Ingle, Emily 




281 


Hillman, Troy 


328 


,383 


Hotzman, Rachel 




239 


Ingram, Larissa 




421 


Hills, Danica 




383 


Hougas, Keith 




386 


Ingrassia, Dana 




236 


Hills, E. 




263 


Houk, Jenny 




76 


Ingratta, Lauta 




386 


Hilquist, Eric 




383 


House, Chad 




305 


Iniguez, Tony 




227 


Hilton, Amanda 


273 


,332 


House, Kila 




386 


Inman, Michelle 


28, 386 


Hinchey, B. 




263 


Houser, Kim 




279 


Inrarakumhang, Bob 




286 


Hinchey, Michael 




383 


Housron, Gregory- 


237 


,386 


Inrorp, Sheryl 




281 


Hindel, J. 




257 


Howard, Craig 




304 


Iovenelli, Mary 




250 


Hinderlitet, Holly 




255 


Howard, Danal54, 156, 157, 163,228 


Ippolito, Jami 




285 


Hiney, Kristina 


127, 370 


,386 


Howard, Joanna 




351 


Irani, Khushnaaz 




386 


Hinnen, Matthew 




386 


Howell, Josh 




266 


Irwin, Brian 




293 


Hinojosa, Rita 




296 


Howlett, B. 




249 


Irwin, L. 




249 


Hinrichs, Patficia 




386 


Hoyne, D'ann 


269 


,386 


Isaacs, Timothy 




386 


Hinsell, Rick 




186 


Hoyt, Jason 




333 


Isaacson, Stacey 




387 


Hintz. J. 




259 


Hrad, Daniel 




421 


Isacson, Craig 




38" 


Hipona, Josephine 




386 


Hrischuk, Amy 


164 


,167 


Isenberg, Jennifer 




351 


Hirsch, Jory 




386 


Hroma, Karen 




265 


Iskalis, J. 




258 


Hirsch, K. 




273 


Hsiao, Annie 




386 


Israel, Maya 




239 


Hirsch, S. 




244 


Hsieh, John 




386 


Israelite, Dan 




200 


Hitchings, Bret 




237 


Hsu, Doreen 




386 


Iszak, Charlotte 




239 


Hiwtz, Stephanie 




386 


Hsu, Monique 


344,351 


,386 


Iungrich, Josh 




238 


Hjelmgten, David 




343 


Hsu, V. 




260 


Iverson, Barbara 


312,387) 



Iverson, C. 




258 


Johnson, Robb 


285 


Kaplansky, Mindy 


261 


Ivey, Carla 




387 


Johnson, S. 


273 


Kapp, John 


140, 302 


Iyama, Mieko 




281 


Johnson, Sarah 


236 


Kapsimalis, G. 


247 


Iyengar, Sridhar 




146 


Johnson, Scott 


252 


Karawan, Greg 


293 








Johnson, T. 


244 


Kardatzke, Dan 


241 


/* 


^5^ 




Johnson, Thomas 


387 


Karger, Krista 


259 


f j 


y 




Johnston, J. 


245 


Karmazin, Karen 


208,317 


<-X 


/\ 




Johnston, Maura 


387 


Karolewski, Erica 


265 


A 


fj 




Jokisch, Derek 


387 


Karr, Mike 


312 


^M- 


*s 




Jokisch, Gretchen 10, 12, 273, 328, 339, 346, 387 


Karrson, Jennifer 


242, 387 


s^S 






Jones, Amy 


387 


Karsen, Andy 


299 


cs 






Jones, Anthony 


195,228 


Karter, Keri 


265 








Jones, B. 


249 


Karth, Matt 


290 


Jaber, Hazem 




30 


Jones, Brian 


299 


Karubas, Kari 


216 


Jacala, Yogendra 


212, 249, 387 


Jones, Christy 


341 


Karuschak, A. 


263 


Jack, Anne 




387 


Jones, Darrel 


387 


Kasdan, Terry 


184,231 


Jackels, Ben 


286,301 


Jones, Erniia 


387 


Kasinger, Thomas 


387 


Jackman, Nicole 


111 


,236 


Jones, Gayle 


255, 329 


Kaspar, Brian 


387 


Jackoks, Kendrick 




333 


Jones, J. 


258 


Kasper, Ed 


252 


Jackson, Craig 


274, 30 


Jones, Jackie 


346 


Kassulat, Michelle 


387 


Jackson, Jennifer 




387 


Jones, Kristen 


197 


Katsaros, Stephanie 


247, 328, 335 


Jackson, Kimberly 




387 


Jones, Martin 


154 


Katz, Amy 


239, 261 


Jackson, L.C. 




143 


Jones, Mike 


286 


Katzke, Evan 


286 


Jackson, Leonard 




387 


Jones, Richard 


224 


Kaufman, Melissa 


261 


Jackson, Marilyn 




387 


Jones, S. 


244 


Kaufman, Robyn 


261,387 


Jackson, Melle 




387 


Jones, Tiffanie 


333, 387 


Kaufman, Ryan 


280 


Jackson, Patrice 


296, 387 


Jonker, Tracey 


387 


Kauke, Brian 


252 


Jackson, Scott 


241 


,282 


Jorgenson, Jennifer 


337 


Kaul, Sameer 


128 


Jackson, Stacey 




312 


Josephson, Kim 


261 


Kauss, Mary Beth 


250, 345, 387 


Jacksoon, Darren 




333 


Joya, Selina 


421 


Kavaliauskas, Tracy 


250 


Jacob, S. 




328 


Joyce, Eric 


293 


Kawada, Jodi 


258,310,350 


Jacob, Stephen 




343 


Juaniza, Martha 


335 


Kawanaka, Sandy 


271 


Jacobs, Lorie 




387 


Judd, C. 


273 


Kawczynski, L. 


263 


Jacobsen, Carrie 




285 


Judge, Jessica 


387 


Kay, Lisa 


261, 335 


Jacobson, Kathy 




261 


Jung, Cathy 


258, 350 


Kazmienzak, Thomas 


387 


Jacobson, Todd 


286 


,387 


Jungheim, Emily 


118 


Ke, Edward 


327 


Jaconetti, M. 




244 


Jungman, Jeff 


302 


Keane, Carrie 


265 


Jaeger, Michelle 




250 


Junkas, Jeff 


285 


Keane, Jeff 


281 


Jaeschke, Lisa 




265 


Junkus, Kristin 


323 


Kearney, Julie 


263,315,328 


Jaggi, Anju 




345 


Junkus, S. 


269 


Keck, Thomas 


387 


Jahn, Chris 




291 


Junzil, Lisa 


281 


Keefauver, Sarah 


387 


Jakala, Julie 


265 


,387 


Jurek, Jeremy 


297 


Keegan, Ryan 


304 


James, Jacquie 


285,344,351 


Juson, Aileen 


321 


Keegan, Scott 


243 


Jamil, Annisa 


279 


,387 


Justice, Andrew 


280 


Keeley, Eric 


387 


Jaminski, T. 




269 


Justin, C. 


245 


Keenan, K. 


260 


Janacek, C. 




244 


Justman, Derek 


387 


Keenan, Pat 


304 


Janas, Mary E. 




242 


Juzesyn, Michelle 


387 


Keenan, Tamra 


387 


Janowiak, Nancy 




265 






Keene, Richard 


170 


Jansen, K. 




263 






Keil, Nick 


287 


Jansses, Rachel 




345 


, ^^S 


s* 


Keiser, Ryan 


251 


Januszyk, Ross 




387 


( JV 


/ 


Keith, Jeff 


389 


Jaramillo, Dario 




266 


^yjLj 


V 


Kelber, Rachel 


239 


Jassim, Omar 




116 


^k, 


s~\ 


Keller, A. 


245 


Jayaram, Mayure 




265 


* WW' 


J 


Keller, Daniel 


389 


Jazo, Robert 




387 


*^r f^ 


/ 


Keller, Francine 


261 


Jean, Sean 




302 






Keller, James 


389 


Jean-Baptiste, Shirley 




387 


Kaczmarczyk, Adrianna 


387 


Keller, Jeff 


267 


Jefferis, Tiernnee 




265 


Kadlec, Greg 


266 


Kelley, Shawna 


245, 389 


Jeffrey, Viva 


269 


387 


Kahan, Adam 


290 


Kelley, Todd 


291 


Jenkins, Bammeke 




387 


Kahan, Corrie 


239 


Kellogg, Tim 


238 


Jenkins, Earl 




195 


Kahley, Dave 


285 


Kelly, Beth 


263 


Jenkins, K. 




273 


Kahn, Jacquelin 


281 


Kelly, Briant 10, 12, 260, 328, 332, 339, 346, 389 


Jenkins, Sarah 


71 


144 


Kahn, Jacquelyn 


387 


Kelly, Britton 


389 


Jennings, Dave 




280 


Kahn, Missy 


230, 239 


Kelly, Dan 


304, 389 


Jensen, Gena 




387 


Kahn, Sara 


261 


Kelly, Jennifer 


338 


Jensen, Jana 




279 


Kahn, Shari 


265 


Kelly, Kristy 


285 


Jensen, Steven 


299 


387 


Kairys, Candi 


323 


Kelly, Martin 


304 


Jenson, Lenore 




281 


Kaiser, A. 


273 


Kelly, Melinda 


141,236 


Jent, Steven 




387 


Kaiser, Dana 


250 


Kelly, Mike 


304 


Jenveja, Priya 




310 


Kaiser, Derrick 


284 


Kelmachter, Heather 


239 


Jesberg, Lori K. 




242 


Kaiser, Jeff 


266 


Kemmis, Sonja 


279 


Jeter, B. 




260 


Kaka, Aaron 


297, 387 


Kemner, Lauren 


285 


Jewell, Matt 


238, 350 


Kalafut, Jen 


271 


Kemp, Todd 


266 


Jimenez, David 




132 


Kalaher, Chad 


237 


Kempel, Josh 


238 


Jimenez, Irlanda 




296 


Kalesperis, Todd 


266 


Kempton, Lori 


236 


Jin, Peter 




297 


Kalerz, Ronda 


203 


Kendeigh, Anne 20, 21, 244, 339, 346, 351, 389 


Jobes, Emily 




189 


Kalina, Brian 


290 


Kendeigh, Donald 


20,21 


Jochum, K. 




247 


Kalish, Chris 


322 


Kenessey, Chris 


243 


Jodlowski, Joy 




285 


Kalivas, J. 


244 


Kenessey, George 


243 


Joergensen, Matt 




285 


Kalivas, Stephanie 


340 


Keniley, Kimberly 


344, 351 


Jogmen, Joe 




267 


Kalla, Meredith 


387 


Kenline, T. 


247 


Johns, JT 




293 


Kallman, K. 


259 


Kenneheck, Doug 


243, 389 


Johns, Mike 




299 


Kallmayer, Frederick 


59 


Kennedy, Karhleen 


118 


Johns, T. 




247 


Kallstrom, M. 


249 


Kennedy, M. 


328 


Johnsen, Beth A. 




242 


Kalseth, K. 


258 


Kennedy, Mike 


200 


Johnson, Aaron 




387 


Kamin, Amanda 


387 


Kennedy, Narhan 


109 


Johnson, Adam 




303 


Kamin, Michael 


387 


Kenner, E. 


328 


Johnson, Andrea 




387 


Kaminecki, Jodi 


265 


Kent, Kristin 


236 


Johnson, April 




139 


Kaminski, Julie 


322, 387 


Kern, Andrew 


243 


Johnson, Brandy 




343 


Kaminsky, Jeff 


345 


Kern, Joanne 


242, 389 


Johnson, Brent 




297 


Kamp, S. 


249 


Kern, Shane 


246 


Johnson, Brian 




387 


Kan, Geegee 


321 


Kernan, Pat 


246 


Johnson, Bruce 




387 


Kanabay, R. 


260 


Kerr, Johnathan 


228 


Johnson, Carl 




387 


Kanani, S. 


269 


Kerr, Jonathan 


163 


Johnson, Connie 




223 


Kanaris, Jenny 


29, 362 


Kerr, M. 


245 


Johnson, Cotina 




387 


Kane, A. 


249 


Kerr, Megan 


27, 389 


Johnson, D. 




259 


Kane, K. 


273 


Kerrigan, T. 


269, 328 


Johnson, Darren 




252 


Kane, Theresa 


249, 387 


Kesman, Amy 


27, 245 


Johnson, Dave 




291 


Kanernori, Dan 


322 


Kessler, K. 


247 


Johnson, Disa 




164 


Kang, Julie 


281 


Kesterke, Michelle 


250 


Johnson, E. 




247 


Kang, Tim 


332 


Key, C. 


247 


Johnson, Erie 




387 


Kanik, Rebecca 


337, 387 


Khambatta, Zubin 


389 


Johnson, J. 


244 


249 


Kanke, T. 


328 


Kheradyar, David 


389 


Johnson, Jenelle 


190, 191 


341 


Kantas, T. 


260 


Khosla, Arun 


389 


Johnson, Johnny 


155, 159 


163 


Kanwischer, Doug 


322 


Kiaschko, Jenny 


279 


Johnson, K. 


244, 245 


Kao, Steve 


285 


Kiaser, Shane 


329 


Johnson, Kim 




239 


Kaplan, Denise 261 


, 339, 387 


Kibbons, Karhryn A. 


242 


Johnson, Mark 


179 


286 


Kaplan, Jenn 


239 


Kice, Susannah 


389 


Johnson, Michelle 


88,89 


Kaplan, Mark 


290 


Kidd, Anne 


350 


Johnson, Rebecca 




312 


Kaplan, Robyn 


239 


Kidd, N. 


263 



August 20 

The NAACP dismissed Benjamin Chavis, the 
executive director, due to the fact that he used 
$300,000 of NAACP funds for his own legal use. 

French troops that had been stationed in Rwanda 
guarding refugees, withdrew from the country. 

August 21 




President Clinton's Crime Bill was passed by the 
House, and the Senate passed the bill on Aug. 25. 
Clinton signed the $30 million crime law, but he 
warned his audience at an elaborate White House 
ceremony that the bill would not stop the violence 
plaguing the nation. The law banned many assault 
firearms, allowed the death penalty for dozens more 
federal crimes and provided billions of dollars over 
six years to build prisons and hire police. This law 
was regarded as a huge victory for the Clinton 
administration. After the bill was passed, Clinton 
said, "Our country will not be safe again until all 
Americans take personal responsibility for them- 
selves, their families and their communities. Even 
this great law cannot do the job alone." 

August 27 

In order to stop the influx of Cuban refugees, 
the U.S. decided to hold talks with their government 
on immigration issues. 

August 28 

Viacom agreed to sell Madison Square Garden, 
the New York Knicks, the New York Rangers 
and the MSG cable network to Cablevision and ITT 
for $1.07 billion. 

August 31 

The IRA announced a cease-fire in the 25-year 
war against Britain in Northern Ireland. 

The federal court ruled that it is illegal to discharge 
an officer for disclosing his or her sexual orientation. 



Index/Timeline 441 



A YEAR OF 




September 1994 



September 1 

The U.S. began talks with Cuba in hopes of 
ending the refugee crisis. 

Women who were harmed by silicone breast 
implants were awarded a $4 billion settlement. The 
agreement was the largest product liability settle- 
ment in U.S. history. 

September 8 

A USAir plane crashed outside of Pittsburg, Penn., 
killing all 132 passengers on board. Flight 427 was the 
fifth USAir plane to crash in five years. 

September 9 

Prosecuters for the O.J. Simpson case stated that 
they will seek life imprisonment instead of the death 
penalty if Simpson is found guilty. 

September 11 

Actress Jessica Tandy died at the age of 85 from 
ovarian cancer. She won an oscar for her portrayal 
of a southern woman in "Driving Miss Daisy." 

September 12 




Frank Corder crashed a stolen plane onto the 
lawn of the White House. Corder died in the crash, 
but no one at the White House was injured. 

September 13 

Marion Barry, a democrat who was forced from 
office in 1991 due to drug use, won the mayoral 
election in Washington D.C. 

Executives of United Way were charged with 
stealing more than $1 million from the charity. 



442 Index/Timeline 



Kieffer, Karen 


389 


Kochendoerfer, Ron 


137 


Kunci, Jim 


Kielar, Laura 


281,389 


Kodosky, Chrisropher 


339, 389 


Kuo, Shirphone 


Kil, Teri 236,321,389 


Koehn.J. 


328 


Kurban. K. 


Kilcoin, Nicole 


183 


Koelm, Bill 


267 


Kurian, Ann 


Kiley, Tim 


246 


Koenig, Andrea 


279 


Kurman, Mitch 


Kilis, Christine 


389 


Koenig, Lori 


340 


Kurrh, Jen 


Killian, Mark 


340 


Koers, Marko 


195,214 


Kurth, K. 


Killian, Mary 


244, 389 


Kofron, Frank 


389 


Kurth, Scott 


Kim, Chong 


389 


Kogan, Jill 


314 


Kurtjian, Lorena 


Kim, Danny 


389 


Koh, Doris 


265 


Kurtzik, Steve 


Kim, Ed 


310,321 


Kohl, Alisa 


242, 389 


Kurrzman, Mike 


Kim, J. 


269 


Kohl, Laura 


285 


Kus, Gregory 


Kim, Jane 


12 


Kohlase, C. 


273 


Kushemba, Mark 


Kim, Jim 


285 


Kohlbacher, Kelly 


265 


Kushner, Michele 


Kim, Kun-Soo 


129 


Kohlhagen, Anne 


341 


Kuster, Christopher 


Kim, Sharon 


321 


Kohlmeier, Candice 


419 


Kuster, Sara 


Kim, Steve 


321, 389 


Kohnke, Joanna 


271 


Kutsor, Chrisropher 


Kim, Wook 


71 


Kok-Alblas, K 


269 


Kvbasnicka, Lisa 


Kimmel, Lissa 


197 


Kolaz, Nikki 


71 


Kwaitkawski, Dan 


Kimoto, Eric 


280 


Kolman, Kim 


343 


Kwok, Yenni 


Kincanon, Kerry 


281 


Kolodzinski, Stacie 


389 


Kwon, Andrew 


Kinder, Melissa 


389 


Kommers, Ryan 


299 


Kwong, Wendy 


King, Bob 


302 


Konnekker, Alissa 


351 


Kyro, E. 


King, Brert 


252 


Konowal, Tony 


284 


Kyros, Nicole 


King, Brian 


253 


Konrath, Lisa 


340 


Kyros, S. 


King, Cassandra 


389 


Konsoer, Dave 


284, 389 




King, Dave 


238 


Konsoer, K. 


257 




King, James 


343 


Koo, John 


49 


S" — - 


King, Jerry 116,326 


, 329, 342 


Koob, Peter 


340 


( 


King, Julie 


389 


Koonce, Shane 


237. 320 


VJ 


King, K. 


257 


Kop, Libby 


389 


^f 


King, Michele 


285 


Kopay, Rachel J. 


242 


f 


Kinneman, E. 


258 


Kopec, A. 


257 


cz>c_ 


Kinney, J'ne 


258, 346 


Kordash, S. 


273 




Kinsley, Josh 


302 


Korman, J. 


258 


Labahn, Steve 


Kinstler, John 


251 


Korse, Chad 


389 


LaBella, Matt 


Kirby, Eric 


389 


Korsgren, Christine 


389 


LaCasha, Trish 


Kirby, K. 


260 


Kortcamp, Andy 


224 


Lacey, Robert 


Kirkey, Joe 


302 


Korte, Chad 


251 


Lachcik, Pam 


Kirkland, Justin 


389 


Korte, Jen 


279 


LaChica, Margie 


Kirkland, Kelly 


389 


Kosmopoulos, John 


18 


Lacivita, Michelle 


Kirkparrick, Carrie 


271 


Kosowski, Glen 


243 


LaCrosse, T. 


Kirkpatrick, Shannon 


286, 389 


Koss, Serra 


334 


Lacy, Jo-El 


Kirsche, Alisa 


239 


Kostal, Thomas 


303, 389 


Lacy, Ronald 


Kirstein, Erik 


228 


Kostopoulos, Kostas 


389 


Ladage, Terry 


Kirrs, Rhonda 


339 


Kotak, Aartie 


137 


Ladgenski, Derek 


Kish, Andrea 


389 


Kotowicz, Andy 


299 


Ladin, Stephanie 


Kite, Alison 


261 


Kotowski, Corey 


243 


Laduke, Meredith 


Klafeta, Karen 


389 


KotsaliefT, Angela 


389 


Laechei, Mark 


Klamrzynski, H. 


259 


Kottaras, Kathv 


76 


Laepatina, Tim 


Klapp, Sandra 


271,389 


Koulis, H. 


258 


Laesch, P. 


Klappauf, Laurie 


279 


Kourelis, Dino 


252 


LafTerty, Mark 


Klapper, Jessica 


197,229 


Koutsavous, Gus 


246 


Laib, Robert 


Klaus, Gavin 


304 


Kovacik, Erika 


279 


Laird, David 


Klaus, Matthew 


389 


Kowalczyk, Mark 


251 


Lais, Pete 


Klaus, Paul 


291 


Kowalewski, Sharon 


321,389 


Lakamp, Doug 


Klayman, Jessica 


285 


Kowaiski, Bill 


304 


Lake, Daniel 


Klayman, Tanya 


285 


Kowalski, K. 


259 


Lake, Keith 


Klebba, K 


247 


Kozalzynski, Natasza 


265 


Lakin, Kimberly 


Klebosits, Karen 


271,389 


Kozaritz, Heidi 


389 


Lam, Phoung 


Klee, Kevin 


389 


Kozdron, Becky 


250 


Lam, Phuong 


Kleefisch, Nicole 


271 


Kozlowski, Wendy 


389 


Lamar, Frank 


Kleemann, Neil 


286 


Kracun, Thomas 


252, 389 


Lamb, Amy 


Klein, Dan 


284, 389 


Kraft, C. 


259 


Lamb, Johny 


Klein, J. 


247 


Krajecki, L. 


249 


Lamb, Tess 


Klein, Jaime 


261,389 


Kramer, Jen 


239 


Lamb, Tricia N. 


Klein, Jason 


345 


Kramer, K. 


249 


Lambe, M. 


Klein, Jen 


265 


Kranz. Jill 


285 


Lambos, Alexia 


Klein, Jennifer 


340 


Krarochvil, K 


257 


Lamm, Jerry 


Klein, John 


291 


Krauss, Adam 


303, 389 


Lamont, Jeff 


Klein, Julie 


310 


Krebel, Michelle 


389 


Lamoreaux, Darcy 


Kleinkemper, Michael 


310 


Krebs, Charles 


15,25 


Lamos, Steven 


Kleinschmidt, Jen 


250 


Kreening, Brian 


299 


Lamotte, Christina 


Klemm, Cynthia 


328, 389 


Kreger, Mike 


322 


Lamphear, Matt 


Klemm, Krisrine 


273, 389 


Kreibich, Jay 


322 


Lancaster, Amy 


Klemm, Kurt 


303, 389 


Krein, Phil 


121 


Land, Susanne 


Klepper, J. 


269 


Kreloff, Lori 


239 


Landeck, A. 


Kletecka, Frank 


389 


Kreloff, Lynn 


239, 389 


Landers, Jill 


Klevens, Hearher 


239 


Krempski, Mark 


390 


Landler, Michael 


Klimek, Josh 


224 


Kreps, Christopher 


291,333 


Landron, Danielle 


Klimes, S. 


263 


Kresin, Rebecca 285, 


334, 344, 390 


Landry, Jeremiah 


Kline, Brad 


139 


Kretchmer, A. 


269 


Landwer, Mark 


Kline, Charley 


415 


Krerzer, T. 


273 


Lane, Dan 


KJing, Gary 


329 


Kreurzer, Jessica 


279 


Lane, M. 


Klingel, K 


259 


Krickenbrink, John 


299 


Lane, N. 


Klintworth, Sheri 


285 


Kriegsmann, James 


200 


Lang, Matthew 


Klomans, Jennifer 


321 


Krisrof, Tom 


266 


Lang, Stephen 


Kloosterman, Lisa 


250 


Kroencke, Greg 


284 


Lang, Taryn 


Klorh, Michael 


389 


Kroening, Brian 


390 


Lange, Bryan 


Knapp, A. 


257 


Krohn, N. 


258 


Langer, Stefanie 


Kniewel, Ryan 


323 


KroII, Chris 


329 


Langlands, Dave 


Knight, Mathew 


253 


Kron, Jaime 


261 


Langley, Sara 


Knittel, Leslie 


279 


Krueger, K. 


249, 257, 260 


Langston, Lori 


Knobloch, Chris 


238 


Kruegger, Lisa 


390 


Lanham, Cole 


Knodle, Sreve 


237 


Krug, Dave 


243, 350 


Lanter, Joe 


Knopoff, Elissa 


261,389 


Krug, Mark 


390 


Lanucha, Brian 


Knopow, Jeremy 


327 


Krusa, Brad 


253 


Lanz, Ronald 


Knox, Heather E. 


242 


Krzeminski, James 


304 


LaPorta, M. 


Knudsen, Heidi 


285 


Kubicki, Lee 


241 


Larican, Marjorie 


Knudsen, Todd 


340, 389 


Kucharczyk, Suzanne 


353 


Larsen, J. 


Knutson, Alyssa 


279 


Kuchniski, J. 


259 


Larsen, Julie 


Knutson, K. 


259 


Kudenholdt, Kris 


312 


Larson, Danelle 


Kobilca, L. 


269 


Kuebrich, Chris 


297 


Larson, Jennifer 


Kobylinski, Brian 


219, 389 


Kueetschner, Eric 


299 


Larson, John 


Koca, Julie 


236 


Kueker, Matt 


285 


Larson, Karen 


Koch, Greg 


252 


Kugler, Sheri 


390 


Larson, Mike 


Koch, Marie 


285 


Kuharik, Leah 


273, 390 


Larson, Susan 


Koch, Scott 


280 


Kuhlemeier, Amanda 


382 


Lash, John 


Koch, Sheryl 


245 


Kulp, N. 


247 


Lasko, Rhonda 


Kochar, Pavan 


326, 345 


Kumar, Risha 


281 


Las ky, Joseph 




Lasse, J. 




273 


Levy, Deb 




335 


Lucchesi, Chris 


279 


LaSusa, Beth 




257 


Levy, Kimberly 


261 


,391 


Lucie, M. 


244 


Laswell, S. 




259 


Levy, Michelle 




261 


Lucius, Kristen 


394 


Latch, Stacey 




390 


Levy, Stanley 




148 


Luckey, Alva 


22 


Latshaw, J. 




244 


Lewandowski, Christopher 


391 


Ludvikscn, Melissa 


249, 394 


Lattanzio, Brenda 




265 


Lewensky, L. 




259 


Ludwig, G. 


258 


Lau, Sau Wai 




390 


Lewickyj, Greg 


314,315 


Ludwig, J. 


257 


Laudeman, Craig 


281 


,390 


Lewis, C. 




263 


Luecking, Phil 


291 


Laudeman, Julia A. 




242 


Lewis, Colleen 




250 


Luehr, Stephanie 


250 


Laughlin, Tracey 




285 


Lewis, Eric 




267 


Luetkemeyer, Todd 


200 


Launer, Lauta 245 


,332 


,390 


Lewis, Julie 


279 


.391 


Lufkin, Melissa 


223, 245 


Lausch, Andtew 




390 


Lewis, Renee 




261 


Lukas, John 


394 


Lauten, Kim 




390 


Lewis, Rice 




19 


Lukasik, Lauren 


285 


Laux, T. 




273 


Lezak, Jodie 




261 


Luke, Bryan 302 


327, 342 


Lav, Wing-Mei 




390 


Lezak, Missy 




261 


Lukus, R. 


260 


LaVallie, Dan 




185 


Lezotte, Melissa 




391 


Lund, Andy 


183 


Laverty, Cari 




390 


Li, Mandy 




391 


Lund, Debra 


394 


Laverty, Paige 




285 


Libkin, Caryn 




391 


Lundberg, K. 


247 


Lavett, Peter 




390 


Libman, Rachel 




239 


Lundeen, Kristen 


250 


Lavette, Michael 




390 


Lichrenwalter, Michelle 321 


391 


Lundgren, A. 


259 


Lavin, A. 




258 


Lidinsky, Kelly 




271 


Lundine, Daniel 


394 


Lawrence, Chris 




305 


Lidy, Dave 




391 


Lung, Jennifer 259 


339, 394 


Lawrence, Rick 




284 


Liebling, Julie 


261 


391 


Lunnemann, Jennifer 


394 


Lawrence, Terry 




343 


Liebman, Adam 




290 


Lurito, Amy 


261, 394 


Lawson, Darweed 




343 


Lierman, K 




249 


Lustfelt, Christine 


279 


Lawson, Michael 


328 


390 


Lies, K. 




244 


Lutgu, Alma 


339 


Layne, John Allen 


251 


390 


Lifchitz, Julie 




261 


Luther, Craig 


394 


Laytin, Andy 




290 


Lillrick, Becky 




321 


Luttrell, Jon 


286 


Lazarus, Samantha 




261 


Lim, Chan 


243 


351 


Lutz, Jim 


203 


Lazzari, Brad 




390 


Lim, Jae 




340 


Lux, Brent 


394 


Lease, Christine 




271 


Lim, Linella 




242 


Lyda, J. 


269 


Leavell, Craig 




390 


Limmel, Lissa 




229 


Lykins, Nick 


237,316 


Leavitt, Jason 


251 


390 


Lin, Elizabeth 




391 


Lymburner, Jennifer 


394 


Leavitt, Jen 




239 


Lin, Jet-Sun 




326 


Lynch, Andy 


304 


Leavitt, Karin 




239 


Lin, Michelle 




317 


Lynch, Gregory 


394 


Lebo, L. 


247, 328 


Lindberg, S. 




263 


Lynch, Jennifer 


317 


Lechner, V. 




269 


Lindgren, Kristin 




391 


Lynch, Kelli 


255,350 


Lechowicz, Laura 


247 


390 


Lindgren, Kristina 




346 


Lynch, T. 


257 


Lee, A. 




263 


Lindholm, Brian 




391 


Lyndc, Christy 


236 


Lee, Dave 


267 


285 


Lindquist, Michael 




299 


Lyon, Kerri 


95 


Lee, David 




390 


Lindsay, L. 




263 


Lyons, Harmon 


290 


Lee, Drew 




299 


Lindsey, Kathy 




174 


Lyons, S. 


269 


Lee, E. 




260 


Lindstedt, Stacy 




279 






Lee, Eunsuk 




390 


Link, Greg 




303 






Lee, Hojoun 




390 


Link, Michelle 




391 


/J 


/2 


Lee, Jason 




378 


Linkhart, B. 




244 


/J 


/J 


Lee, Jessica 




164 


Linscott, Brian 


353 


,391 


/w/ 


'M 


Lee, Jooeun 




390 


Lipinski, Stacza 




335 


/w/i 


TS-\ 


Lee, Joyce 




351 


Lipitz, Stacey 




239 


m /v/1 


r/ y 


Lee, King Yee 




390 


Lipman, Nadine 




271 


%~y z/ \ 


_^s 


Lee, Lawrence 


221 


228 


Lipman, Samantha 




271 






Lee, M. 




269 


Lisk, Nicole 


334, 339 


,391 


Maasberg, J. 


258 


Lee, Michael 




333 


Liter, Cari 




279 


Mablilangan, Rochelle 


321 


Lee, Michelle 




390 


Littell, Ann 




391 


MacArthur, Kristin 


259 


Lee, Patricia 


182 


390 


Liu, Kevin 




297 


MacBeth, Dean 


394 


Lee, Payton 




390 


Liu, Ted 




312 


MacDonald, B. 


245 


Lee, Peter 




390 


Lively, M. 




249 


Macedo, Goncalo 


219,231 


Lee, S. 




273 


Lizio, Nicole 




285 


Macek, T. 


273 


Lee, Samantha 




390 


Llanes, Brainard 




391 


Macellaio, Mike 


56,79 


Lee, Sang Woo 




71 


Lloyd, Matt 




253 


MacEntee, Aveen 56, 250 


339, 394 


Lee, Sean 




299 


Lo, John 




312 


MacHannalord, Juan 


394 


Lee, Seong-Kook 




390 


Loayza, Yvette 




250 


Maclntyre, Andrew 


243 


Lee, Seonghi 




390 


Locascio, Gina 




279 


Maclver, Andrew 


266 


Lee, Tom 




391 


Loechl, Erica 




230 


MacKenzie, Daniel 


394 


Leeders, Sean 




391 


Loehrke, Mike 




246 


Macko, Erin 


265 


Leen, Pat 




299 


Loftis, Sean 




251 


MacLaren, Emma 250, 338, 339, 351, 395 


Lees, Lloyd 




391 


Loftus, Thomas 


321 


,394 


MacLean, Matt 


243 


Lefler, T. 




245 


Logan, C. 




258 


MacPherson, Louise 


395 


Legendre, David 




267 


Logli, John 




303 


Macri, P.J. 


246 


Lehmann, Janelle 




255 


Lomasz, Sara 




394 


Madeck, Paula 


395 


Lehmkuhl, Mark 




266 


Long, A. 




249 


Madigan, Mike 


281 


Lehmkuhl, Mike 




266 


Long, Brandon 


106,322 


,394 


Madise, Danielle 


345 


Lehn, Brian 


253 


332 


Long, Monica 




394 


Madoch, K 


263 


Leibman, Chris 




252 


Longawa, Jen 




239 


Maeder, Michael 


186,395 


Leiding, H. 




273 


Longoria, T. 




249 


Magee, B. 


263 


Leighton, Travis 




391 


Lonze, J. 




245 


Magee, Kimberly 


281 


Leinbach, Heather 


244 


391 


Loo, Wai Ling 




394 


Maggio, Jay 


291 


Leitch, Will 




312 


Loomis, Gabrielle 




340 


Maggio, Lori 


395 


Lemke, Alyson 




236 


Lopez, Angel 




394 


Magna, Anne Marie 


124 


Lemke, Debra 




391 


Lopez, Arturo 




394 


Mahanti, Sriketan 


129 


Lemke, Katherine 




391 


Lopez, Christine 




394 


Maher, Sara R. 


242 


Lemon, Kate 




341 


Lopez, Jeanette 




394 


Mahnke, C. 


269 


Lemperis, P. 




257 


Lopez, Jose Antonio 




97 


Mahorney, Michael 


299 


Lenkaitis, Albert 




391 


Lopez, Keila 




81 


Maima, Eric 


395 


Lennon, T. 




260 


Lopez, Ramiro 




186 


Majeres, Ryan 


343, 345 


Lenthe, K, 




273 


Lord, James 


281 


,394 


Majka, Amy 


49 


Leon, Carmen 




265 


Lord, Maureen 




271 


Majka, Richard 


49 


Leon, Corazon 




391 


Lorden, Ann 




285 


Major, John 


335 


Leon, Jorge 


323 


,333 


Lorenz, Amanda 


271 


,310 


Majure, Charlotte L. 


242 


Leonard, Travis 




321 


Lorenz, Kristen 




285 


Maki, E. 


259 


Leonarduzzi, Annmarie 




391 


Lores, J. 




258 


Maki, Lisa 


395 


Leone, Joe 




281 


Losanke, Dave 




304 


Makowski, Violet 


335 


Leong, Adrienne 




391 


Losieczka, Gail 


340 


,394 


Malec, S. 


269 


Lesak, D. 




258 


Lotta, Lisa 




394 


Malik, Ron 


343 


Lessman, Jennifer 




261 


Lotz, Emily 




279 


Malinger, David 


340, 395 


Lesters, K. 




245 


Love, Francinc 




362 


Malito, A. 


258 


Letzkus, Jen 




236 


Lovett, Bradley 




394 


Malito, John 


395 


Leumix, Gwendelyn 




281 


Lowery, Michael 




394 


Malk, Kari 


261 


Leung, Jason 




327 


Lowery, Nichole 




394 


Malkanil, Monica 


340 


Leung, Rosanna 




345 


Loweth, Colin 




394 


Malloney, Amy 


329 


Levenson, Marc 




391 


Lowrwait, Debbie 




261 


Malone, Chuck 


280 


Levie, Heather 




239 


Lu, Larry 




299 


Malone, Kay 


296 


Levin, Geoff 




280 


Lualhati, Karen 




236 


Malone, Kristen 


395 


Levin, Jessica 




258 


Lubawski, K. 




249 


Manalo, Jenny 


321 


Levin, Noah 




391 


Luberda, Jennifer 


265 


,394 


Mancini, L. 


257 


Levin, Staci 




239 


Luberda, Robin 




250 


Mandzukic, V. 


258 


Levine, Gregory 




391 


Lubitsch, liana 




351 


Manfredo, Dan 


299 


Levinson, Amy 




261 


Luby, M. 




263 


Mangan, Brian 


281 


Levun, Jami 


239 


,391 


Lucas, Sarah 




250 


Mangano, L. 


244 


Levy, Becky 




261 


Lucas, Stacy 




258 


Mann, Jason 


251 



September 15 

During a televised address, President Clinton 
threatened to invade Haiti if the current leaders did 
not step down. Jimmy Carter and Colin Powell were 
sent to Haiti the next day in order to persuade the 
leaders to relinquish their hold on the government. 
As a result of the negotiations, the leaders agreed to 
step down by Oct. 15. 

Exxon was ordered to pay $5 billion in damages 
caused by the oil spill of the Exxon Valdez in 1989- 

September 17 




Heather Whitestone, a deaf woman from Ala- 
bama, became the first contestant with a disability to 
win the Miss America Pageant. Her slogan in the 
competition was "Youth Motivation: Anything is 
Possible." She offered proof that anything is possible 
when she was crowned the 68th Miss America at the 
Atlantic City Convention Center. 

September 21 

The oldest human fossils known to date, dating 
back 4.4 million years, were found in Ethiopia. 

September 23 

Judge Lance Ito threatened to ban television cov- 
erage of the O.J. Simpson trial due to the sensationalist 
practices of the media during the investigation. Ito was 
concerned that the court would be unable to find jurors 
that were unfamiliar with the case and had not already 
formed opinions about Simpson's guilt. Jury selection 
for the trial began on Sept. 26. 



Index/Timeline 443 



A YEAR OF 




September 1994 



September 26 




After months of partisan bickering and lobby- 
ing from insurance companies, Senator George 
Mitchell, the Senate Majority Leader, announced that 
he would abondon his efforts to pass the Health Care 
Reform Bill through the Senate. 

September 28 

Walt Disney & Co. announced that it would not 
build a historic theme park in Virginia. The decision 
pleased many environmentalists and historians who 
were against the park due to the fact that it would 
overdevelop and ruin the area. 

September 30 

The National Hockey League delayed the start 
of the season in order to continue negotiations 
between players and managers. 



October 1994 

October 9 

U.S. troops entered the Gulf Region. Forces com- 
bined in an effort to warn Iraqi leader, Saddam Hussein, 
that they would move in if Iraq attacked Kuwait. 



444 Index/Timeline 



Mann, Jenn 


239 


McAllister, Joel 




395 


Mead, Mike 


303, 3 


Mann, Kristina 


136 


McBride, Pat 




299 


Meade, Mike 


1 


Manning, M. 


245 


McBroom, J. 




257 


Meadors, Kimberly 


3 


Manning, Stephanie 


257, 295 


McCabe, E. 




249 


Meana, Timothy 


304, 3 


Manpearl, David 


198 


McCaffrey, Douglas 


299 


395 


Means, L. 


2 


Manson, Tom 


302 


McCaffrey, Jennifer 




395 


Meccia, Cheryl 


3' 


Mansukhani, Aneil 


315.340 


McCall, Jamie 




395 


Medder, Karhleen 


3', 


Mansuri, Shehnaz 


395 


McCarter, A. 




244 


Medico, Vince Del 


2; 


Mantell, Dana 


239, 395 


McCarthy, Emmett 184 


185 


395 


Medina, B. 


2 


Mantis, Christina 


242, 339, 395 


McCarthy, Erin 




257 


Medina, Dario 


3 


Manusmare, Smita 


30 


McCarthy, Laura 


265 


395 


Medina, Lilian 


5 


Matatea, Derek 


281 


McCarty, Alison 


33 


245 


Mednick, Lauren 


2. 


Marble, Jen 


285 


McClintic, David 




328 


Meece, Tricia 


2 


Marchiori, James 


395 


McClintock, Kristine 


269 


395 


Meeker, Lori 


2 


Marcin, Denny 


154, 161 


McClowry, S. 




244 


Meeker, Tim 


241,3 


Marco, Missy 


261 


McClung, D. 




257 


Meerdin, Lois 


3 


Marcos, Omar 


280 


McClung, Scott 243 


350 


395 


Megginson, Amie 


1 


Marcotte, Dana 


326, 327, 345 


McClure, Brian 




224 


Mehochko, John 


3> 


Marcotte, Monica 


250, 395 


McClure, Joan 




395 


Mehta, Sam 


2 


Marcovich, Miroslav 


16. 17 


McClusky, Amy 


273 


313 


Meinhart, Ken 


3 


Marek, Tom 


306 


McCollum, Dannel 




98 


Meisenheimer, Katherine 


3 


Mares, Rachel 


242, 395 


McConaha, Lori 




395 


Meisinger, Cassie 


2 


Margolis, Lee 


395 


McCormick, Jody 271, 316, 339, 350, 395 


Meissen, David 


3 


Margolis, Paul 


290 


McCorquodale, M. 




244 


Meister, Keith 


2' 


Marianetti, Steve 


179 


McCoy, Emily 




279 


Melacon, Louis 


3 


Marini, Marc 


299 


McCoy, Evelyn 




395 


Melam, Liz 


2 


Marino, Tricia 


259, 306 


McCoy, Joaquin 


92 


335 


Melbye, Brandon 


1 


Markward, Nate 


266 


McCoy, Steven 




395 


Melecosky, Marcie 


1 


Marotta, Jon 


340 


McCoy, Vicki 




395 


Melinder, Jeffrey 


243, 3' 


Marozas, Marlene 


395 


McCreary, Paul 




138 


Mellican, Marry 


2 


Marquez, Christian 


395 


McDaniel, A. 




247 


Melnick, E. 


247, 3 


Marrese, Jennifer 


395 


McDaniel, Mariann 




395 


Meloy, H. 


2 


Marshack, Sara 


229, 395 


McDearmon, E. 




244 


Melton, Rick 


1 


Marshall, Crystal 


395 


McDermott, Lauren 


236, 395 


Mendel, Lynn 


2 


Marston, Kevin 


243 


McDonald, Heather 




395 


Mendez, Norma 


3 


Martain. M. 


257 


McDonald, Joe 




243 


Mendez, S. 


2 


Martello, Brian 


299, 395 


McDonald, L 




257 


Mendez, T. 


2 


Marti, G. 


247 


McDonald, Sean 




291 


Mendia, Leo 


2 


Martin, Anthony 


395 


McDonald, Suzanne 




273 


Mendoza, Aimee 


2 


Martin, J. 


245 


McDonald, Todd 




95 


Mendoza, G. 


2 


Marrin, Jeff 


224 


McDonough, Chris 


200 


,201 


Mendoza, Juan 


3 


Martin, John 


395 


McDonough, Colleen 


269 


,344 


Menet, M. 


2 


Martin, Julie 


395 


McDonough, Daren 194 


, 195 


,228 


Menezes, Anand 




Martin, K. 


247 


McDonough, H. 




328 


Meng, Candice 


3 


Martin, MaryBeth 


257 


McDowell, Ellen 




22 


Mennecke, Erick 


2 


Martin, Mason 


305 


McEldowney, Mike 




280 


Mennecke, Steven 


291,3 


Martin, Pat 


243 


McEniry, Pat 




251 


Menshek, Holly A. 


2 


Marrin, Sandra 


90 


McEvers, Kelly 


312 


,336 


Mentel, J. 


2 


Martin, Scott 


395 


McEvoy, Pat 




335 


Meola, Kristi 


196, 1 


Martin, Stacia 


351 


McEwen, Eric 




395 


Merbaum, Leslie 


2 


Martinez, A. 


263 


McFarland.J.D. 




281 


Mercado, Teodoro 


3 


Martinez, Juan 


284 


McFarlin, Steven 




395 


Mercer, Lindy 


2 


Martinez, S. 


258 


McGarr, R. 




260 


Meredirh, Bob 


3 


Martinez, Scott 


284 


McGaughney, Jeff 




328 


Meredirh, Laura 


2 


Martinez, Suzanne 


257 


McGee, Carolyn 




342 


Merkin, Laura 


261,3 


Martos, Rebecca 


395 


McGee, Sheri 




143 


Merrirt, Linda 


2 


Marty, Chris 


205,230,313 


McGill, T. 




263 


Merryview, June 


3 


Marucco, K. 


273 


McGinn, Brian 




297 


Merrens, A. 


2 


Marx, Christopher 


395 


McGinnis, A. 




247 


Mertes, Robert 


2 


Marx, Pete 


179 


McGivern, L. 




245 


Meschewski, Jamie 


2 


Marx, Sara 


328,351,395 


McGlaun, Greg 




219 


Meservey, Dave 


2 


Marzynski, Anya 


296 


McGowan, Kathy 


296 


,395 


Messana, Anthony 


140,3 


Maslowski, Kristen 


310,346 


McGrary, Justin 




251 


Messina, C. 


2 


Mason, Beth 


236 


McGrath, E. 




269 


Messina, Cherisse 


3 


Mason, Leanne 


395 


McGrath, Greg 




266 


Messina, Robert 


3 


Mason, Michael 


302, 395 


McGrath, Liz 




279 


Messing, Carol 


337,3' 


Massucci, Matt 


243 


McGrath, M. 




249 


Messinger, Rachel 


2 


Masten, Audra 


25,395 


McGrath, Marty 




281 


Metcalfe, Becky 


2 


Masterson, Brad 


299 


McGuire, E. 




245 


Metcalfe, Jason 


3 


Masterson, Brandon 


121 


McHale, Megan 




236 


Metes, Bill 


3 


Marar, Monica 


395 


Mclnerney, Kevin 




395 


Metzger, Colleen 


3 


Mateja, M. 


260 


Mclntire, Alyssa 




397 


Meyer, Brian 


2 


Mathai, Joyce 


395 


Mclnrire, Megan 




258 


Meyer, Catherine 


2 


Mathews, Sarah 


247, 328, 395 


Mclntyre, Michael 


31C 


,328 


Meyer, J. 


2 


Mathieson, C. 


258 


McKaughlin, K. 




249 


Meyer, M. 


2 


Mathieson, Christine 


310,340,350 


McKee, Lisa 


255 


,397 


Meyer, Su-Lin 


3 


Mathon, A. 


273 


McKendrick, Matthew 




397 


Meyers, B. 


3 


Matilla, June 


265 


McKenna, Ben 




251 


Meyers, Eric 


290,3 


Matsuo, Yukie 


395 


McKenna, Mike 




397 


Meyers, Jackie 


3 


Matthaie, Mark 


293 


McKenzie, Katie 




250 


Meyers, Kim 


271,3 


Matthew, Delia 


395 


McKeown, B. 




269 


Meyers, Perry 


2 


Matthews, Jessica 


265 


McKeown, Jodi 


351 


,397 


Michaelson, Anna 


3 


Matthys, M. 


247 


McfCiernan, Jen 




250 


Michal, Mary 


3 


Mattila, June 


395 


McKinley, John 




186 


Michalczyk, D. 


2 


Mattilla, Matt 


305 


McKinney, Michael 




397 


Michalczyk, Julie 


3 


Matts, Carrie 


239 


McKinnon, Kari 




285 


Michalek, S. 


3 


Mattson, J. 


259 


McLane, Jennifer 




31 


Michel, James 


297,3 


Matula, Kristine 


395 


McLaughin, Nate 




293 


Michel, Mary 


2 


Marusiak, Paul 


293 


McLaughlin, C. 




273 


Michonski, Chris 


2 


Maulding, Rusty 


238 


McLaughlin, D. 




263 


Miculinich, Michelle 


3 


Maurer, Chris 


302 


McLaughlin, Jeremy 




293 


Mielowitz, Ann 




Mauritzson, Julie 


340, 395 


McLaughlin, K. 




249 


Mierwinski, P. 


3 


Mavec, Marty 


284 


McLaughlin, Lisa 




236 


Mies, Tim 


2 


Maves, Mindy 


351 


McLaughlin, Marc 




267 


Miglin, B. 


2 


Maville, Betsy 


351 


McLaughlin, Tim 




284 


Mikel, Amy 


242,3 


Mavros, Dana 


265 


McLeenan, Brian 




285 


Mikel, Christine 


242,3 


May, Karen 


395 


McLeod, S. 




258 


Mikoda, James 


3 


May, Kim 


242, 321 


McMahon, K. 




244 


Mikulins, Jeff 


3 


May, Teri 


395 


McMeekin, K. 




257 


Milani, Colleen 


3 


Mayer, Alisa 


281 


McMillan, Kyle 




237 


Miles, Michael 


3 


Mayer, J. 


244 


McMullen, Michelle 


257, 397 


Millar, Tony 


2 


Mayers, Mandy 


340 


McMurray, John 




252 


Miller, A. 


3 


Maynulet, Roget 


284 


McNally, Tara 




285 


Miller, Alan 


2 


Mazeska, Dave 


299 


McNear, Christopher 




397 


Miller, Amy 


2 


Mazlowski, K. 


259 


McNeela, Kelly 




340 


Miller, C. 


2 


Mazukelli, Mike 


293 


McOlgan, Lance 




284 


Miller, Chad 


2 


Mazur, Amanda 


239 


McQuillan, M. 




269 


Miller, Christopher 


3 


Mazur, Dan 


214 


McRea, Pat 




291 


Miller, David 


3 


McAleenan, Brendan 


267 


McVey, Eric 




305 


Miller, Jessica 


239,3 


McAllister, Jeana 


316 


Mead, Megan 




245 


Miller, K. 


2 



Miller, Karyn 




261 


Morey, Pat 




72 


Myers, Jamey 




398 


Miller, Kevin 




285 


Morgan, LaTacia 


65,90 


Myers, Jenni 




242 


Miller, Kimberly 




397 


Morganelli, James 




398 


Myers, Katherine 




398 


Miller, L. 




273 


Moriariry, Timothy 




398 


Myers, Melissa 




398 


Miller, Maureen 




271 


Moric, Mira 




279 


Myers, Simone 




398 


Miller. Mike 




136 


Morin, Graham 




299 


Myung, Semyoung Mike 


297 


398 


Miller, Mikki 




239 


Morr, David 




398 








Miller, Nathan 238,316,339 


,397 


Morrell, Jen 




265 








Miller, Nichole 




397 


Morris, Aaron 




238 


/i 


/ 


-"» 


Miller, Patty 




397 


Morris, Alison 




239 


/k , 


/ 




Miller, Paul 




280 


Morris, Jeremy 




237 


/ m / 






Miller, S. 




263 


Morris, K. 




258 


/ f / 






Miller, Scott 




340 


Morris, Karen 




398 


* / ¥/ 






Miller, Stacey 


418,419 


Morris, Kathy 


242 


398 


±y y 






Miller, Stephen 




397 


Morris, Robert 




398 








Miller, Todd 


238 


,397 


Morrison, K. 




244 


Naatz, B. 




244 


Millerick, T. 




269 


Morrone, T. 




260 


Nache, Leticia 




296 


Milligan, Rebecca 




250 


Morschauser, K. 




249 


Nacheman, Scott 




398 


Milnarik, Elizabeth 




23 


Morse, Jannah 




398 


Nacke, Jerrimy 




340 


Milner, Julie 




341 


Moscato, Sabrina 




321 


Naderi, E. 




258 


Milsk, Susan 




261 


Moschetti, Tanya 


345 


398 


Nadick, Ryan 




398 


Mims, Holley 




281 


Mosher, Brian 


186 


187 


Nadler, Julie 




261 


Min, Bryan 




246 


Moulder, Amy 




281 


Nadolski, Amanda 




17 


Mina, Melsie 




404 


Moulds, Elizabeth 279, 339, 350, 398 


Naffziger, J. 




259 


Mindrum, Robert 




333 


Mourning, Charles 




21 


Naggs, Kathy 




340 


Mingo, Benny 




397 


Mouser, Dave 




237 


Nagle, Joseph 


281 


398 


Mini, Karen 




397 


Movrich, Maureen 




398 


Nagy, Greg 




281 


Minnaert, Jill 


285 


397 


Mowen, Eric 




238 


Nahumyk, Andy 




321 


Minnerick, Matt 




246 


Mowry, John 




398 


Naik, Ashish 




30 


Minor, Chris 




299 


Moy, Cynthia M. 




242 


Nakayama, J. 




257 


Minor, Cynthia 




263 


Moyano, Paul 




335 


Nakayama, Naomi 




265 


Minor, Jeff 




281 


Moyers, Windy 




285 


Nail, Jon 


251 


335 


Minor, Laura 




322 


Mozayeni, Mariam 




398 


Nance, Jamie 




299 


Minor, Paula 


204 


230 


Mozina, Robert 




398 


Napoleon, Brian 




297 


Minos, Michelle 




397 


Mozingo, Scott 


238 


329 


Napolitano, Jason 




304 


Mirabile, Dave 




252 


Mrozek, Roman 




266 


Napper, Latasha 




138 


Miranda, Carlos 




312 


Mrozeu, Joshua 




398 


Nardulli, B. 




263 


Mirkin, Marci 




239 


Mueller, Chris 




291 


Narimatsu, Kevin 


332 


398 


Mis, Laura 




397 


Mueller, Dana 




398 


Natarajan, Rajsekhar 




398 


Miscinski, Kurt 




299 


Mueller, Erin 




398 


Narh, Antara 


351 


398 


Mise, Clyde 




274 


Mueller, Jennifer 


296 


398 


Nathan, Joshua 


338 


399 


Misener, Ann 




397 


Mueller, Karen 




281 


Nativi, A. 




247 


Misener, Laurie 




397 


Mueller, Kristie 




258 


Naughton, Erin 


265 


335 


Mishra, Rana 




335 


Mueller, Margaret 




263 


Naunheimer, Christopher 




399 


Misiura, Andrea 




257 


Mueller, Matt 




267 


Neale, Larry 




145 


Misner, Caroline 




397 


Muellet, Melissa 




398 


Nebel, N. 




249 


Mitchel, Melissa L. 




242 


Mueller, Michele 




261 


Neckermann, Mike 


92 


335 


Mitchell, Kevin 




252 


Mueller, Mike 




291 


Nedlo, Jason 




266 


Mitchell, M. 




258 


Mueller, Suzanne 




255 


Nedzel, Andy 


228 


243 


Mitchell, Mark 




397 


Mueller, T 




249 


Nee, James 


299 


399 


Mitchell, Todd 




302 


Mueth, Aimee 




398 


Neel, Jack 




252 


Mitofsky, Sandra 326, 327, 339, 397 


Mulcahey, Tim 




251 


Neff, Dave 




186 


Mitter, Angela 


334, 397 


Mulcahy, Kourtney 




317 


Nehls, Cory 




251 


Mitts, John 




299 


Mulchrone, Rachel C. 




242 


Neidich, Mindy 




239 


Miyakita, Hiromi 


118 


119 


Mulcrone, Jeffrey 




398 


Neidorf, Shawn 




399 


Miyamoto, Akiko 


258 


397 


Mulcrone, Joe 




304 


Neirrek, Mitchell 




399 


Mize, Clyde 




333 


Mulcrone, Julie 




259 


Neiswender, Brian 




266 


Mizrachi, Adela 




261 


Mulder, Sonia 




279 


Nejman, Sue 




66 


Mlynski, Melissa 




397 


Mulhern, J. 




249 


Nelson, B. 




244 


Mocchi, Jack 




397 


Mulholland, Mulholland 




257 


Nelson, Cameron 




252 


Mocchi, Jim 




398 


Mullarkey, Ann 




285 


Nelson, Erica 




323 


Mocek, Joan 245, 


310, 320, 344 


Mullen, Stephanie 




236 


Nelson, Erika 




236 


Mock, Cheryl 


329 


345 


Muller, Tanya 




398 


Nelson, Jenny 




285 


Mockairis, J. 




257 


Muller, Wade 




80 


Nelson, K. 




249 


Modestas, Lina 




335 


Mulligan, Mike 




266 


Nelson, Karl 




333 


Modica, Matt 




304 


Mulrey, Tom 




266 


Nelson, L. 




247 


Moe, Dorothy 




345 


Mulrooney, Linda 


265 


,398 


Nelson, Lisa 




279 


Moeckler, Jamie 




239 


Mumaw, J. 




249 


Nelson, Marion 279 


,321 


,399 


Moehlenkamp, York 




342 


Muncy, Jason 




243 


Nelson, Tim 




291 


Moehring, Monica 




279 


Munday, Lynn 


281 


,398 


Nelson, Tom 




299 


Moellring, Emily 




398 


Mundorff, Sherry 




271 


Nestler, David 




299 


Moglia, Laura 




351 


Mungerson, Darren 




303 


Nesvacil, Robert 


336 


,337 


Mohamed, A 




328 


Munoz, Bill 




266 


Neuhaus, E. 




257 


Mohamed, M. 




257 


Munoz, Cecilia 




398 


Nevius, Jennifer 


271 


,399 


Mohr.J. 




259 


Munoz, William 




398 


Newell, Greg 




303 


Mohr, Mark 




321 


Munro, John 


260 


,398 


Newell, J. 




257 


Moll, Kris 




398 


Munsell, Kelly 




398 


Newell, Mike 




251 


Molnar, Kristen 


344, 421 


Munson, C. 




249 


Newhouse, Evan 




251 


Moloney, Kevin 




302 


Munson, Tyler 




267 


Newlander, H. 




269 


Momon, C. 




258 


Muribi, Salem 




251 


Newman, C. 




257 


Monahan, Brian 




304 


Murillo, Nicole 




398 


Newman, Christopher 




399 


Mondul, Alison M. 




242 


Murin, Christophet 




343 


Newman, Eve 




239 


Mongkolsmai, Gaitsiri 


398 


Murnane, Brian 


299 


,398 


Newman, J. 




245 


Monico, Eric 




398 


Murphy, Ann 




398 


Newman, Robin 




399 


Monk, Kevin 


238 


,316 


Murphy, Bob 




297 


Ng, Maggy 




399 


Montemayor, Gladys 


269, 335 


,344 


Murphy, Brian 




241 


Ngo, Minh 




252 


Montero, Kristin 




216 


Murphy, Gabbin 




302 


Ngo, Van Thy 




399 


Montez, Marjorie 




398 


Murphy, Julie 


340 


,398 


Nguyen, Mai 




281 


Montgomery, Ben 




281 


Murphy, K. 




247 


Nicholas, Riz 


120 


,302 


Moody, Jim 




284 


Murphy, M. 




244 


Nichols, Ken 




299 


Moody, Michael 




398 


Murphy, Megan 


279 


,398 


Nichols, Kimberly 




399 


Moon, Donald 




398 


Murphy, Molly 


257 


,398 


Nichols, V. 




263 


Moon, Sandra 




321 


Murphy, Robert 




398 


Nicholus, Michael 


340 


,399 


Moore, A. 




263 


Murphy, Shannon 


250 


,421 


Nickas, Steve 




304 


Moore, Amy 


141,236,398 


Murphy, Steve 




237 


Nicke, Dana 




399 


VIoore, Angela 


255,310 


,320 


Murray, Amy 




398 


Nickel, Jane Ellen 




15 


Vloore, Derek 




398 


Murray, Colleen 




398 


Nickel, Richard 




399 


VIoore, Joshua 


326 


,327 


Murray, Ryan 




287 


Nickols, Ken 




329 


j vloore, T. 




249 


Murrin, Norm 




291 


Nicolle, Tori 




340 


| vloore, Vicki 




344 


Mursu, K. 




269 


Nieciecki, Cathy 


336, 337 


I Vloralde, Jocelyn 




398 


Muscolino, MaryLin 




257 


Nielssen, Robyn 




279 


i vlorales, Gelene 




349 


Musgrave, Kristin 


244 


,398 


Niemeyer, Susan 




335 


1 Morales, Jethandelyn 


69, 348 


,398 


Mushrush, Tammy 




310 


Nimnicht, K. 




260 


) vloran, Brian 




246 


Musselman, Chris 


321 


,398 


Ninnam, Neil 




399 


i vloran, Chris 




243 


Musur, Jeff 




421 


Nishimura, Audrey 




399 


' vloran, S. 




273 


Myalls, J. 




257 


Nisperos, Arnez 




321 


vloran, Tim 




267 


Myatt, Theodore 




398 


Nix, Keith 




399 


vloraski, Dave 




343 


Myers, Beth 




398 


Nixon, Kyle 




340 


. vloreland, A. 




260 


Myers, Carl 




195 


Noback, Chuck 




299 


jvlorelli, M. 




259 


Myers, David 




398 


Nobili, Mauro 




399 



October 15 




Jean-Bertrand Aristide returned to power in Haiti 
after three years in exile in the United States. Supporters 
praised him and thanked the U.S. for helping to oust the 
military coup that had forced Aristide from power. About 
21,000 U.S. troops landed on the island, and they were 
followed by an international force charged with keeping 
peace until Aristide fully regained control of the country. 

October 20 

"Crossing the Threshold of Hope", Pope John 
Paul IPs first book, was released in 35 countries and 
was printed in 21 languages. 

October 23 

Oprah Winfrey accomplished her goal of com- 
pleting a marathon. She ran the 19th Annual Marine 
Corps Marathon in just under four and one half 
hours; this time was 40 seconds under her goal. 
Winfrey was one of 13,000 runners. 

October 29 

A Colorado man opened fire on the White 
House. The gunman, 26-year-old Francisco Martin 
Duran, fired 30 shots into the north side of the White 
House before two civilian men caught him. 

Sixty people celebrating Halloween were ar- 
rested at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. 
The festivities caused extensive damage. 

October 31 

American Eagle Flight 4184 crashed en route to 
Chicago. The crash killed 68 people, and it was the third 
major air disaster in 1994. 

November 1994 

November 1 

Champaign County jail inmates were required 
to make co-payments for any medical services that 
they needed. 



Index/Timeline 445 



mm?m& 




November 1994 



November 3 

Susan Smith confessed to the murder of her two 
sons, Michael and Alex. Smith claimed that an armed 
assailant forced her from her car on Oct. 25 and 
drove away with her t3oys. The nine day search 
stretched from Georgia to Seattle and ended with the 
confession of Smith. 

November 7 

It was announced that GRE exams will be 
completely computerized by 1997. 

The ownership of the Sears Tower was passed 
over from Sears Roebuck & Co. to Boston-based 
Aldrich, Eastman and Waltch. 

November 8 

David Pearson, Dean of the College of Educa- 
tion at the U of I, announced he would leave his 
position in July of 1995 for the John A. Hannah 
Distinguished Professor of Education position at 
Michigan State University in East Lansing. 

November 9 

Governor Jim Edgar defeated Dawn Clark Netsch 
in the 1994 gubernatorial race. Edgar received 64 
percent of the votes. Republicans took over the 
House and Senate for the first time in 40 years. They 
also won a string of governorships. Included in the 
many upsets were Gov. Mario Cuomo of New York 
and Ann Richards of Texas, both Democrats. Rick 
Winkel won the 103rd district over Laurel Prussing. 

November 12 

A single engine plane crashed after leaving 
Willard Airport. The crash killed two LI of I alumni 
on their way home after the Penn State v. Illinois 
football game. 

November 13 

Lack of business caused Walt Disney World to 
plan a $2 billion expansion including an animal 
theme park, water park, cruise ship and three hotels. 

November 14 

The space shuttle Atlantis landed in the 
Mojave Desert. 

November 15 

In Albania 29 people were killed by a cholera 
outbreak. Thousands of people were hospitalized. 



446 Index/Timeline 



Noble, J. 


257 


Olberg, Thor 




399 


Park, Hokyung 


4j 


Noble, Scott 


299 


Oldfield, Heather 




399 


Park, Julie 


4i 


Nogle, E. 


259 


Oldfield, Karin 


334, 399 


Park, Seung 


4' 


Nolan, C. 


269 


Olesen, Nick 


303, 


399 


Park, Woosuk 




Nold, Zachary 


399 


Oliver, Chris 




287 


Parke, Evan 


2 


Nolker, Jennifer 


399 


Oliver, Karen 




271 


Parker, Alyx 


2 


Nomanbhoy, Z. 


263 


Olkowski, Joy 




399 


Parker, Dan 


2 


Nommensen, Anna 245, 


314,315 


Olmos, Oscar 




281 


Parker, Drew 


1 


Noonan, David 


299 


Olsansky, Stephanie 




399 


Parker, K. 


2 


Noonkester, Matt 


284 


Olsen, Dave 




321 


Parker, Rob 


2 


Norbut, Jodi 


236, 399 


Olsen, Emily 


84 


335 


Parkinson, Becky 


2 


Nordbrock, Amy R. 


242 


Olsen, Eric 




246 


Parks, Drew 


2 


Norem, S. 


249 


Olsen, Grady 




246 


Parmelee, Heather 


285.310,3 


Norman, Rebecca 


255 


Olson, Catherine 




399 


Parmet, Lauren 


2 


Norr, Jeffrey 


399 


Olson, Darren 




266 


Parr, Brian 


2 


Norris, Heather 


265 


Olson, Dave 




293 


Parr. C. 


2 


Norris, Jackie 


281 


Olson, Eric 




88 


Parrillo, V. 


2 


Norris, K. 


259 


Olson, Kathy 




250 


Parry, Chuck 


2 


Norris, L. 


269 


Olson, Katie 




323 


Parsell, Julie 


4 


Nosek, Luke 


322 


Olson, Kirsten 


222 


399 


Parsons, Charles 


297,4 


Novak, Jeff 


302 


Olson, M. 




259 


Parsons, Chris 


2 


Novak, Rob 


266 


Olson, Matt 




304 


Parsons, Kathy 


245,3 


Novello, M. 


249 


Olson, Melisa 


259 


399 


Partaker, Eric 


2 


Novotny, Karin 


250 


Onik, L. 




244 


Paschal, Tiffany 


4 


Novotny, Meg 


399 


Oostendorp, Kimberly 273 


399 


Paschke, Sara 


3 


Nowaczyk, Janet 


279 


Opensky, Brian 




399 


Pasdach, B. 


3 


Nowak. Andy 


280 


Opensky, Lisa 


261 


399 


Paskiewicz, Adam 


4 


Nowak, J. 


249 


Orejudos, Lisa 




399 


Pasquesi, C. 


2 


Nowicki, Renee 


236 


Orendorf, Gretchen 




399 


Pass, J. 


2 


Nowicki, Shannon 


271 


Ori, M. 




257 


Passarelli, James 


246,4 


Nucci, Sue 


164, 167 


Orkin, William 


290, 310 


328 


Passo, Carlos 


3 


Nudell. Marina 


321 


Orloff, Andy 




290 


Pasternak, V. 


2 


Nudo, M. 


244 


Orloff, Erin 




239 


Pataky, Les 


4 


Nudo, Sal 


399 


Ormaniec, Brian 




399 


Patel, Alka 


273,4 


Nuestro, Jen 


265 


Oronov, Oxana 




281 


Patel, Ami 


3 


Nunamaker, A. 


247 


Orr, Beth 




341 


Patel, Anand 


3 


NurkJewicz, R. 


247 


Ortega, Carla 


321 


399 


Patel, Bharat 


3 


Nussbaum, Kimber-Leigh 


261,399 


Ortega, Lupita 


34,35 


394 


Patel, Biraju 


3 


Nygaard, Jim 


246 


Ortiz, Cintia 




296 


Patel, Manisha 


4 






Osborn, Don 




219 


Patel, Mehul 


323,4 






Osborn, Michael 




399 


Patel, Rajeshri 


333,4 


^^~~ 


\ 


Osborne, Andi 




250 


Patel, Shula 


'■ 


S?~\ 


) 


Osborne, E. 




249 


Patel, Smita 


2 


at(j) 


/ 


Osheff, Amy 


245 


399 


Patri, Sreya 


3 


m { ^ / J 




Osheff, M. 




245 


Patt, Esther 




f / 




Oslovich, Lisa 




124 


Patterson, Brooke 


2 


y^y 




Ossowski, R. 




260 


Patterson, J. 


2 






Osterbur, Susan 




399 


Patterson, Jeanette 


4 


O'Brady, Matthew 


343 


Osterbur, Todd 


237 


399 


Patterson, Jennifer 


4 


O'Brien. Amy 


250, 399 


Osterhage, Elizabeth 


279 


323 


Patterson, Jill 


4 


O'Brien, Barb 


335 


Osterkamp, Margaret 


279, 340 


,399 


Patterson, Julie 


4 


O'Brien, H. 


244 


Osterman, Nikki 




285 


Patterson, Melinda 


: 


O'Brien, Jim 


237 


Ostling, Karin 




250 


Patton, Antwoine 


: 


O'Brien, John 


252 


Otto, J. 




258 


Patton, Chas 


4 


O'Brien, Pat 


342 


Ovcina. R. 




245 


Patton, Damon 


i 


O'Connell, Phyllis 


399 


Overstreet, Cory 




251 


Patton, Ontisar 


. 


O'Conner, Marie 


245, 339 


Overtoom, Ryan 




246 


Patzman, Jennifer 


t 


O'Connor, Brian 


399 


Owens, K. 




259 


Paul, J. 


2 


O'Connor, Daniel 


399 


Owens, LaNelle 




333 


Paul. Monica 


; 


O'Connor, Gerald 


399 


Owens, Patrick 




280 


Paul, Stephanie 


L 


O'Connor, J. 


273 


Ozborn, Matt 




285 


Paulauski, Lee Anne 


3 


O'Connor, Marie 


307, 399 


Ozcak, H. 




258 


Paulien, Tammy 


t 


O'Connor, Mary 


399 


Ozley, S. 




263 


Paulson, Nick 


266,3 


O'Connor, Mike 


280 








Pauly, L. 


. 


O'Donnel, Matt 


237 








Pauza, Sharon 


4 


O'Donnell, K. 


273 


/ 


~~>c 




Pavlon, Susan 


l 


O'Grady, S. 


258 


S J 


y\ 




Pavone, Annette 


. 


O'Hara, Man 


266 


( J A 


f J 




Pawlak, Dan 


: 


O'Hara, Noreen 


285 


^^/j 


'— ^ 




Pawlak, Jeffrey 




O'Hare, Steve 


266 


A* 






Pawlicki, Suzanne 


269, <i 


O'Leary, Erin 


271 


*^f 






Pawone, A 


; 


O'Leary.J. 


258 








Payne, Jena 


'. 


O'Malley, Amy 


279, 399 


Pachof, Tania 




335 


Payton, Gina 


279,^ 


O'Malley, Jim 


281 


Pacis, Joey 




228 


Payton, Wes 


; 


O'Mara, Yvette 


250 


Padgett, Alex 




266 


Paz, James 




O'Melia, Corie 


279 


Padron, Paul 




291 


Pazderski, Joanne 


; 


O'Neill, Bridget 


279,351 


Pagakis, Katherine 


35, 242, 362 


Pconka, Nicole 




O'Reilly, Sean 


304 


Page, Kristi 




265 


Peabody, Danielle 


245, i 


O'Sullivan, Jason 


267 


Pagedas, Elizabeth 




403 


Pearl, Julie 


£ 


O'Sullivan, Osian 


282 


Pagliara, Trevor 




403 


Pearl, Mariya 


i 


Oakes, H. 


273 


Painter, Jim 




316 


Pearlman, Joni 


- 


Oatis, Marie 


399 


Paiva, Claudio 




221 


Pearl man, Steven 


280,4 


Obalil.Jen 


265 


Pakla, Pauline 




250 


Pearman, Barry 


- 


Obenauf, Meg 247 


339, 399 


Palac, Mike 




267 


Pearson, Alice 


245,4 


Oberg, Geoff 


399 


Palacio, Gil 


287, 403 


Pearson, E. 


: 


Oberle, Janet 


230 


Palagi, Roy 




252 


Pearson, K. 


- 


Oberly, Amy 


281, 399 


Paletti, Jennifer 


242, 403 


Pearson, Tim 


: 


Obermcier, Angie 


399 


Palkon, Tom 




243 


Pecharich, Mandy 




Obrecht, K. 


273 


Palm, Ryan 




403 


Peck, A 


- 


Obuchowski, Ed 


133,241 


Palma, Vlad 




338 


Peck, Kathryn 


i 


Ochoa, Andres 


302 


Palmer, Alanna 




236 


Peck, N. 




Ochoco, M. 


249 


Palmer, Jessica 




257 


Peckham, Barb 




Odabashian, Kirsten 


229 


Palmer, Mike 




304 


Pecoraro, Giacomo 


. 


Odenthal, S. 


328 


Palmer, R. 




259 


Pedersen, B. 




Oder, Troy 


311,399 


Panigrahi, Neena 


326, 327 


Pedroza, K. 




Oelschlager, James 


399 


Pann, L. 




259 


Peele, Brandon 




Oestreich, John 


224 


Paolella, Anthony 


284, 403 


Peerless, Brian 




Ofenloch, Lauren 


236 


Paolella, Tracy 




249 


Peid, K. 




Ofenloch, Todd 


293 


Papa, Joey 




250 


Peipert, Amy 




Ogren, Holly 


118 


Papier, Alan 




301 


Peisker, John 


24i,; 


Oh, Elaine 249, 307 


339, 350 


Paras, Angie 




287 


Pelak, K. 




Oh, J. 


328 


Parasugo, Paul 




186 


Peldiak, Cathryn 


245,4 


Oh, James 


299 


Parciak, Lisa 




236 


Pellegrino. Martha 




Oh, Johnny 


299 


Parihk, Van 




251 


Pelletier, Christie 




Oh, S. 


245 


Parikh, Khushali 




343 


Pelletier, Kristin 


- 


Ohlhaber, Steve 


297 


Paris, Jeff 




299 


Pelletiere, John 


: 


Ohlinger, Tracy 


236 


Paris, Jeremy 




403 


Pellikan. John 


i 


Ohlquist, Melissa 


250 


Park. Andrea 


250, 403 


Pelta, Rachel 


261.4 


Ohlson, Christi 


399 


Park, Cindy 




403 


Pelton, Lance 


1 


Ohlson, Julie 


250, 399 


Park, Daegyu 




71 


Pena. David 


1 



} ena, T. 




260 


Plavcan, Matt 




305 


Quinn, James 


405 


jchaflor, Day 




281 


Plemons, C. 




260 


Quinones, Gloria 


405 


^nington, Rob 


S2, 286, 403 


Plerz, T. 




269 


Quirk, Jennifer 


147 


'enn, Kurt 


184 


,403 


Pleune, Todd 


284 


,404 






'eragine, Jason 


339, 350 


,403 


Ploog, H. 




269 






'erella, Andy 




186 


Plopys, Lisa 




404 


^~ 


~>*v 


'erez, Ernie 


312 


,331 


Ploski, Ray 




291 


/ ; 


X 1 


'erez, Sonya 




343 


Plotner, Todd 


345, 404 


( J A 


1L*J 


erino, Gina 


313,335 


.403 


Pluene, Todd 




327 


^ 


\3To 


eriu, Julie 




403 


Pocius, Sara 




320 


m w 


wO 


erkins, S. 




269 


Podemski, Michael 




404 


*^r 


f^y 


erkins, Tony 


243 


,350 


Pogofsky, Marcy 




261 






erkinson, Aaron 


253 


,332 


Pogorzelski, Violet 




404 


Raab, Kelly 


236 


ero, Jason 




179 


Pogue, Gina 




250 


Rabe, Pam 


285 


erper, Dan 




290 


Pohl, Albert 




251 


Raber, Doug 


238 


erri, S. 




244 


Pokusa, Jill 




404 


Rachell, Kristie 


335 


erry, T. 




247 


Poletti, Ben 




237 


Radecki, B. 


269 


ershke, Carolyn 


265 


,295 


Polisky, Beth 




261 


Radecki, Carla 


285, 328, 405 


ersico, Ann 


340 


.403 


Polites, James 




404 


Rader, Jeannine 


46, 47, 245 


ersico, Derek 




343 


Polito, C. 




259 


Radetski, Josh 


134 


ersin, Scott 




243 


Pollack, Brian 




280 


Radja, Tom 


184 


erz, L. 




249 


Pollitt, Wade 




253 


Radke, Eric 


328, 405 


esce, Julie 


245, 321 


403 


Pomes, Paul 




415 


Radosevich, Amy 


405 


esche, John 




251 


Pommerenke. K. 




257 


Radosevich, Paul 


241 


essis, Steffie 




261 


Ponds, Christopher 




404 


Radovich, J. 


263 


eter, Christopher 


237, 403 


Pontarelli, Rebecca 




265 


Radvansky, Matrhew 


405 


eter, Cory 




403 


Ponzio, Ben 




349 


Raffanti, Keri 


250 


etermann, Tom 




299 


Pope, Andrea 




404 


Rafiq, Naila 


405 


eters, Amelia 




259 


Porcaro, Anna 


271 


,404 


Rahmanian, Kelly 


129,236 


eters, Andre 




327 


Poremba, juli-Ann 




404 


Rahn, Amanda 


265 


eters, Karen 




271 


Port, Eric 




404 


Rahn, Jandy 


405 


eters, Krista 




236 


Porter. Andrew 


280 


,378 


Rahn, Jeanette 


247, 328, 405 


eters, Patrick 




284 


Porter. Beth 




348 


Rajkarne, Deepa 


351 


eters, Tim 


212 


253 


Porter, Mike 




266 


Rak, Kirsten 


279 


eterson, Amy 


244 


279 


Portnoy, Leslie 




261 


Rakers, L. 


259 


eterson, Carrie 




281 


Poss, Julie 




351 


Rakoski, Kristen 


250, 405 


eterson, Cliff 56,237,310,316,350 


Poss, S. 




247 


Ramaker, Christian 


243 


eterson, James 




299 


Potter, Jay 




164 


Ramirez, Christopher 


52, 353 


eterson, Melissa 


279 


351 


Potter, Sarah 


255 


,310 


Ramirez, Enrique 


302 


eterson, Suzanne 




403 


Potthoff, Mary Jane 




250 


Ramirez, L. 


258 


eterson, Ty 




266 


Potts, Chiquita 




404 


Ramirez, Lisa 


405 


eterson, Wendy 




126 


Potts, Rebecca 271 


,332 


,404 


Ramirez, Mark 


299 


etrinos, Rebecca 


265,321 


403 


Potts, Ryan 




253 


Randall, Becky 


236 


etros, Mike 




304 


Powell, David 




404 


Randell, Jillian 


202, 261 


etroskey, Karen 




351 


Powell, Yolanda 




404 


Randolph, Kim 


258 


etrovich, T. 




269 


Powers, Matt 




117 


Rangaswamy, Priya 


326, 405 


etrucelli, Mary 




403 


Powers, S. 




249 


Ranhen, Dana 


341 


etry, Amy 


338, 40 


Powitz, Jack 


280 


,404 


Rankin, Nancy 


405 


etry, Joel 




297 


Powloski, John 




285 


Ranquist, Courtney 


244, 405 


ettijohn, Kristen 




279 


Pozen, Brian 




287 


Ranquist, M. 


244 


ettinger, Jennifer 




403 


Prahl, Jodi 


273 


,404 


Ransom, Nicole 


285 


ertit, Kevin 




332 


Prange, A. 




269 


Rao, Meghan 


229 


ettit, Tamera 




403 


Prasse, Rob 




238 


Rao, Vandana 


405 


erty, Kathleen 




403 


Prather, Penelope 




404 


Rassin, Ryan 


405 


faucht, Erick 




291 


Pray, Mitch 




253 


Rastorferd, H, 


259 


fluger, Jennifer 


333 


338 


Prechtel, Amy 




279 


Rath, J. 


249 


ham, Chuong 




403 


Prechtel, Andrew 


260, 404 


Ratschan, Nicole 


344 


heiffer, Valerie 




250 


Predovic, Paul 




303 


Raucci, Drew 


243 


helps, Lisa 




285 


Prell, Allen 




405 


Rauch, Natalie 


250 


hilippi, K. 




258 


Presser, Susan 




405 


Rawlish, T. 


269 


hillip, Mark 




243 


Pretty, Anne 




405 


Ray, Jessica 


343 


hillips, Cassie 257 


339,346,40,^ 


Price, Kris 




280 


Ray, L. 


247 


hillips, Jennifer 




404 


Prickett, Jeff 




252 


Ray, Melissa 


321 


hillips, Jon 




303 


Priest, Kim 




250 


Raylord, Sonya 


343 


hillips, Lou 




246 


Priester, Kristie 




405 


Raymond, Ashlea 


236 


hillips, Mark 




291 


Prinz, Mark 




266 


Raymond, Brittini 


271,344 


hillis, Timothy 




404 


Prirzker, Danielle 




239 


Raymond, Heather 


405 


hipps, Marybeth 




404 


Privette, Rebbecca 




285 


Raymond, Katherine 


405 


iatek, Chris 




351 


Prochaska, Jean 




250 


Read, Andrew 


280, 291 


iatek, Christine 




242 


Procious, Sheri 




281 


Reardon, Kristin 


236 


icciola, Emanuele 


326 


327 


Proffit, Matt 




238 


Reason, Elizabeth 


35, 405 


iccione, J. 




259 


Provines, Yani 


271 


,405 


Reategui, Hedy 


279 


ichardo, Elizabeth 




296 


Proxy, Weston 




343 


Reaves, Meredith 


60 


ickerill, Heath 




404 


Pruski, Sue 




250 


Rebara, Mike 


284 


ickrell, Jason 




237 


Prussing, Laurel 




98 


Rebman, J. 


244 


iecki, Noel 




285 


Pryde, Julie 




149 


Recter, Jeanne 


405 


iekarczyk, S. 




260 


Pryor. K. 




258 


Redd, Terrance 


405 


iepenbrink, Rebecca 




321 


Pryor, Matthew 




321 


Redd, Tina 


405 


ieper, Laura 




271 


Prywes, Kim 




261 


Redmond, Stacy 


216 


ierce, Kristen 




343 


Puccini, B. 




247 


Reed, Cathy 


405 


ierhal, Jennifer 




404 


Puchalski, Vanessa 


236, 405 


Reed, Joann 


261 


iet, Dana 




239 


Pudik, Case 




266 


Reeder, David 


333, 347 


ietrzyk, Karla 




404 


Pugh, Mike 




297 


Reese, Rick 


281 


ietsch, Mike 




391 


Pujari, Monisha 




405 


Reetz, Carrie J. 


242 


ihos, A. 




263 


Purl, Brad 




266 


Reeves, Karhleen 


346 


ike, Eric 




252 


Purl, Brian 




266 


Reffert, Eric 


343 


ilewski, Amy 


258 


404 


Pursley, J. 




263 


Refvik, Eric 


252 


ilewski, T. 




258 


Puryear, J. 




263 


Regan, CJ. 


304 


ilolla, Barbara 




404 


Puszkiewicz, Timothy 




405 


Regan, Shamus 


287 


imentl, Christine 




321 


Pyevich, Brian 




284 


Regulus, Curtis 


293, 345, 405 


incus, E. 




244 


Pytlak, Steve 




284 


Rehn, Ellen 


279 


insky, Jodie 




261 








Reicheneker, N. 


269 


nto, Jen 




250 


^^ 


^ 




Reicher, Mike 


49 


ntor, Lauren 




236 


S/^ 


)) 




Reicherr, John 


302 


nzino, David 


324, 325 


W/ A 


I 




Reid, J. 


263 


ovosi, Lisa 




236 


¥ J 






Reid, Karhleen 


249, 405 


pitone, Marianne 


244, 404 


f s 






Reider, Amy 


340 


rello, Brad 




241 


ym^y 






Reidy, Paul 


405 


rk, Breinnan 




317 


^w 






Reierson, Jennifer 


236 


sterzi, Anthony 




303 








Reierson, Trent 


405 


storis, Jill 




271 


Qadcer, Umbreen 




72 


Reiher, Julie 


405 


tsch, Stephen 




404 


Quach, Mike 




380 


Reilly, Aaron 


342 


tts, Amy 




362 


Quartullo, Anthony 




284 


Reily, Paul 


315 


aczkowski, Pat 




15 


Quick, Jim 




266 


Reiman, M. 


273 


ager, Deborah 




404 


Quigley, Brian 




335 


Reincke, Christopher 


101 


immang, R. 




249 


Quigley, Jason 


329, 405 


Reinhart, Jennifer J. 


242 


inkis, Tina 




321 


Quillin, Cristina 


242, 405 


Reinish, Julie 


351 


1 itt, Damien 




157 


Quinlan, J. 




263 


Reinking, Krista 


174, 176 


j inner, Karl 




210 


Quinn, Amy 




249 


Reinmann, Sara 


271 


J ittner, Sharon 


202 


404 


Quinn, Ann Marie 




265 


Reinschmidt, Jessica 


132 



The Illini Union Patio was officially renamed 
the Courtyard Cafe. 

November 16 

The Graduate Employees' Organization released 
their Bill of Rights. Some of the problems that the 
group was trying to resolve were salaries, health 
care and work load. 

The introduction of the new drug simvast- 
atin showed strong possibilities in reducing risk of 
heart attacks. 

November 17 

Tropical storm Gordon moved from Haiti to 
strike Florida. 

November 18 

The Board of Trustees approved a 3-5 percent 
general tuition increase for the fiscal year of 1996. 
Plans were made to build a new Office of Adminis- 
tration and Records southeast of the Levis Faculty 
Center. This new building will house both adminis- 
tration and records in the same building. 

November 21 

Three earthquakes struck Indonesia. The first 
one had a magnitude of 5.6, and injuried 28 people. 

November 22 

Michael Jackson was let off the hook after DNA 
tests disproved a paternity claim for Michelle Flow- 
ers' 10-year-old child. 

November 28 

Jeffrey Dahmer was attacked and killed while 
cleaning a prison bathroom at the Columbia correc- 
tional institution. Dahmer was serving 16 consecu- 
tive life sentences for the dismemberment and 
canabalization of 17 boys and men. 

Workers in Egypt stopped road construction to 
prevent the destruction of the Giza pyramids, the 
last of the seven wonders of the ancient world. 

November 29 

U of I was found in violation of Title IX of the 
Accomodation of Interests and Abilities Act. This 
stated that the ratio between varsity programs must 
reflect the male to female ratio of the student body. 
U of I was lacking in women's varsity sports under 
this title. 

Champaign City Council voted to use Scott Park 
as a water detention site after heavy rainfalls in 
hopes to decrease flooding problems caused by 
Boneyard Creek. 

Kuwait's parliament discussed the segregation 
of classes, libraries and restaurants. Cost was the 
main downfall. 



Index/Timeline 447 



mWmmmm 




November 1994 



November 30 

Champaign City Council approved a plan to 
allow patrons to park in downtown metered spaces 
for free from Nov. 25 to Jan. 2. They hoped this 
would increase shopping to the downtown area by 
allowing people to park for free. 

December 1994 

December 1 

American Eagle cancelled more than a dozen 
flights out of Chicago due to the refusal by pilots to 
fly in icy weather in the same type of plane that 
crashed in Indiana. The ATR turboprops were re- 
placed with planes from southern routes, and Ameri- 
can Eagle resumed their regular schedule in 
early January. 

U of I campus celebrated "World AIDS Day" 
with a "Day Without Art" where Krannert showed 
what the world of art would have been like without 
the contributions from artists with AIDS. The center 
covered up all works of art for the week. Unknown 
assailants vandalized the lobby of the Krannert 
Center for Performing Arts. Students, staff and fac- 
ulty rallied to clean the center before an 8 p.m. show 
in the theater. 

It was announced that gas prices would go up 
as a result of the requirement for cleaner gas in 
major cities. 

December 2 

It was announced that students would be able 
to use their e-mail ph aliases and passwords to 
access the U of I Direct registration program. Regis- 
ter by computer was scheduled to begin in April of 
1995. 

Urbana Mayor Tod Satterthwaite announced 
plans to construct a 175 room, four-story Holiday Inn 
and 800 person convention center at Lincoln Avenue 
and Interstate 74. 

December 4 

Stanley Ikenberry announced his plan to return 
to the U of I after a one year sabbatical at Princeton. 
Ikenberry hopes to return and resume a teaching 
career at the U of I. 

December 5 

Eight mountain climbers in Bulgaria got lost in 
the fog and died in the Balkan Mountains. 



448 Index/Timeline 



Reisinger, Molly 




285 


Robinson, N. 




247 


Rowand, Nada 




Reiter. Jeanne 


265, 328 


,339 


Robinson, Roy 




253 


Rowden, Deena 




Reitman, Jennifer 


239, 405 


Robinson, Theresa 




265 


Rowden, Sara 


285, 


Reiczel, J. 




328 


Robison, Anne 




250 


Rowe, Christopher 




Remocigue, Jeff 




284 


Roche, Kathleen 




406 


Roy, Emilie 




Remotigue, Steve 




284 


Rockel, Candice 




406 


Roy, K. 




Rendel, Sharon 




239 


Rockwood, N. 




269 


Roy, S. 




Renken, Ryan 




405 


Rodgers, Jay 




280 


Royce, Alison 




Renkes, Tom 




280 


Rodgers, S. 




249 


Rozanas, David 




Renner, Jen 




265 


Rodgers, Tina 




164 


Rozgus, Amara 




Rennich, Joel 




312 


Rodrigues, Tony 




345 


Rubendall, Lauren 




Rennick, Jamie 




236 


Rodriguez, A. 




244 


Rubens, Brandon 




Repmann, Paul 




305 


Rodriguez, Antonio 




52 


Rubin, Jacqueline 


209, 257, 


Repp, Darin 




293 


Rodriguez, Claudia 




314 


Rubin, Wendy 




Reppa, Bob 




121 


Rodriguez, Heather 


296 


,406 


Rubino, Lorianne 




Resce, Mike 


267 


,306 


Rodriguez, Ivelisse 




285 


Rucci, Paula 




Resnick. Peter 




415 


Rodriguez, Julie 




52 


Rudich, Jen 




Rest, Lauri 




271 


Rodriguez, Mario 




186 


Rue, Matt 




Reutebuch, W. 




263 


Rodriquez, Claudia 




315 


Ruff, Stephen 




Reuter, Kris 




266 


Rodriquez, Eric 




281 


Ruffolo, Francesca 




Rexroat, Sara 


265 


.310 


Roegge, K. 




258 


Ruge, Jason 


207, 252, 


Reyes, Alvaro 




111 


Roehrig, Jennifer 




406 


Ruhle, Clayton 




Reyes, Nelson 




251 


Roesch, Susan 




259 


Ruiz, Jose 


287, 


Reyes, P. 




273 


Roesler, Karl 




179 


Ruiz, Monique 


321, 


Reyes, Wendy 




405 


Rogalski, Brandon 




251 


Ruiz, Oscar 




Reynolds, Kate 




230 


Rogers, Alice 




239 


Ruiz, Veronica 




Reynolds, Stephen 




405 


Rogers, Dennie 




296 


Rumczikas, Christine 




Rhine, Danielle 




279 


Rogers, Eugene 




406 


Rummel, Charles 




Rhine, Elizabeth 




405 


Rogers, Jennifer 




406 


Rumminger, Brett 




Rhoades, Melissa 




405 


Rogers, Neal 




406 


Rump, C. 




Rhodes, Danny 




224 


Rogowski, Wendy 


242 


,353 


Rumps, Jeremy 




Rhodes, Dusry 




224 


Rohrabaugh, Blake 


186 


,285 


Runkle, Ben 




Rhodes, J. 




273 


Roitstein, C. 




244 


Ruoti, Bob 




Rhodes, Jennifer 




258 


Rojahn, K. 




263 


Rupert, Bryce 




Rhodes, Joanna 




239 


Rokisiak, Rob 




241 


Rupp, Kent 




Rhodes, Josh 




253 


Roleing, J. 




259 


Ruppel, Kevin 




Rhodes, Scott 




136 


Rolf, Brian 




253 


Ruppert, Chad 




Rhodes, Stephanie 


271,310 


,316 


Rolf, Donna 


332 


,350 


Rusell, Melinda 




Rhyne, K. 




247 


Rolfs, JoAnna 


265 


,406 


Rushing, Katrina 




Riccatdi, Julie 




345 


Romano, E. 




328 


Rusk, Steve 




Rice, Amy 




271 


Romano, N. 




249 


Russell, Amy 


335, 339, 


Rice, Jennifer 


265 


,321 


Romanowski, Robert 




329 


Russell, Amy B. 




Rice, K. 




328 


Romero, G. 




258 


Russell, Mendy 




Rice, Sean 




76 


Romick, J. 




328 


Russell, S. 




Rice, Simeon 154, 157, 160, 163, 227, 228 


Romo, N. 




258 


Russell, Toby 




Rich, Debbie 


39, 245 


,405 


Ronan, Courtney 




281 


Russo, David 




Rich, Kelley 




405 


Roney, Stephanie 




406 


Russo, Debbie 




Rich, Matthew 




405 


Rooney, Dave 




304 


Russo, M. 




Richard, Phillip 




328 


Root, Melissa 




236 


Rustin, Ken 




Richards, B. 


257 


,269 


Rootberg, Brett 


280 


,406 


Ruta, C. 




Richards, Doug 




304 


Rosado, Melanie 




273 


Rutener, Karl 




Richards, Lloyd 


159,405 


Rosado, Melisa 




406 


Ruth, Kathy 




Richards, Penny 


257, 405 


Rosas, Sarah 




279 


Rutledge, Chrisrine 


244, 


Richards, Tim 




284 


Rosczyk, Nathan 




253 


Ruttkay, Nicole 




Richardson, Chris 




228 


Rose, Bob 




14 


Ryan, A. 




Richardson, Elaine 


312,331 


,405 


Rose, Chapin 




299 


Ryan, Amanda 




Richardson, Jennifer 




405 


Rose, Greg 




243 


Ryan, Amy A. 


106,322, 


Richardson, John 




246 


Rose, Melanie 


239 


,406 


Ryan, Dan 


314, 


Richie, Loren 




405 


Rose, Stacey 




250 


Ryan, Jen 




Richie, Maurie 




339 


Rose, Steven 




406 


Ryan, K. 




Richmond, Jason 




243 


Rosen, Bonnie 




239 


Ryan, Lorien 


236, 328, 


Richno, Wendy 




405 


Rosen, Marc 




290 


Ryan, Mark 




Rick, John 




252 


Rosen, Marti 




239 


Ryan, R. 




Rickenbrode, Steven 


241 


,405 


Rosen, Melanie 




239 


Rydberg, Laura 


197, 


Rider, Shannon 




405 


Rosen, Sharon 




261 


Ryn, Matt Van 




Riedl, Jill 




343 


Rosenbaum, Lorie 


261 


,406 


Ryner, Judith 




Rieger, Denise 




405 


Rosenberg, Gabriel 


337, 406 






Riemer, Brian 




238 


Rosenburg, Howard 


339, 345 


,406 






Riemer, Joel 




405 


Rosenburg, Miles 




335 


S 


* ^O 


Riggens, Andy 




253 


Rosenfeld, Lisa 


116,236 


( 


fj 


Riggio, Mike 




252 


Rosenkopf, Robyn 


239 


,406 


\A 


z^ 


Riley, Dawn 




190 


Rosenstein, Jaime 




239 


^-m 


^^ 


Riley, Mitch 




267 


Rosenstock, Natasha 




261 


w 




Riley, Pam 




314 


Rosentrerer, Tammy 




406 


*^r 




Riley, Shannon 


236, 402, 405 


Rosiak, E. 




269 






Riley, Sylvia 




338 


Rosiles, Raul 




406 


S-A-Hassan, Sharifah 




Rimar, J. 




249 


Rosing, Bob 




304 


Saak, Aaron 


326, 


Rimovsky, Ann 




405 


Rosko, Cary 




406 


Saarnio, Eric 




Ring, Matt 




285 


Ross, Becca 




126 


Saban, Dan 




Riniket, Andtew 




405 


Ross, Don 




246 


Sabin, Sara 




Rinker, T. 




257 


Ross, Doug 




246 


Sabo, R. 




Ripley, (Catherine 




285 


Ross, Jared 




303 


Sacchitello, Angela 




Rippon, Gregory 


291 


405 


Ross, Jason 




406 


Sachs, Andy 




Risinger, Danya 




351 


Ross, Jeff 




327 


Sachs, Erik 




Riskus, Vida 




314 


Ross, Jeremy 


237, 406 


Saenz, Gina 




Rival, Santi 




281 


Ross, Rachel 




406 


Safford, Kevin 




Rivera, Ennedy 




296 


Ross, Scott 




251 


Sagan, Laurie 


339, 


Rivera, Marlene 




405 


Rosselein, K. 




260 


Sager, Chad 




Rivera, Norm 




280 


Rosser, K. 




257 


Sagett, Scott 




Roach, A. 




244 


Rosserer, Nicole 




406 


Saha, Somali 




Roach, C. 




247 


Rossi, Joe 




251 


Sain, Theresa 




Robak, Renee 




250 


Rossovich, Ericka 




281 


Sainz, Alberto 


299, 


Roberston, John 




293 


Rost, Brian 




293 


Sair, Arnie 


316, 


Robert, Shawnna 




250 


Rosy, Chris 




241 


Salasche, Amy 




Robert, Tony 




246 


Roth, Annie 




261 


Salasche, Dayns 




Roberts, Brooke 




285 


Roth, Bryna 




261 


Salazar, Eileen 




Roberts, David 




405 


Roth, Justin 




406 


Salinas, Stephanie 




Roberts, Jennifer 




197 


Roth, Megan 




261 


Sallmann, Beth 




Roberrs, Josh 




321 


Roth, Ryan 


243,311 


406 


Sallmann, Laura 


285, 


Roberts, Pete 




291 


Rottach, Timothy 




280 


Salomon, Claire 




Roberts, R. 




263 


Rottman, A. 




328 


Saltzmann, Craig 




Roberts, Srephanie 




285 


Rottner, Courtney 




261 


Salyer, Lara 




Robertson, Craig 




405 


Rottschalk, John 




299 


Samaan, Marcus 




Robinson, A. 




245 


Roupas, S. 




269 


Sambor, Brian 




Robinson, Adam 




293 


Rouse, Max 




251 


Samet, Tim 




Robinson, Amy 




300 


Rousenelos, Sara 




285 


Sampson, Carolyn 




Robinson, Angie 




250 


Roush, Ellard 




332 


Samson, L. 




Robinson, Brian 




290 


Roush.J. 




249 


Samuels, Debra 




Robinson, Marcy 




406 


Rovegno, A. 




328 


Sanabria, George 




Robinson, Mark 




253 


Rovelstad, Dan 




280 


Sanchez, Chris 





Sanchez, Maria 




142 


Schripsema, Jason 




326 


Shepard, Lori 


279 


Sanchez, Rosa 




271 


Schroeder, Joe 




132 


Shepard, M. 


328 


Sanchez, Sylvia 




296 


Schrof, Derek 




329 


Shepard, Tricia 


239 


Sanders, Dave 




303 


Schuberth, Doug 


267, 407 


Shereyk, David 


340 


Sanders. Hope 




190 


Schuerman, J. 




273 


Sheridan, Don 


301 


Sanders, Shana 




261 


Schule, Chris 




293 


Sheridan, Trent 


266 


Sanders, Wes 




252 


Schuler, B. 




328 


Sherk, Tara 


269, 407 


Sanderson, R. 




244 


Schuler, J. 




273 


Sherlock, Jennifer 


259,310,350 


Sands, Jennifer 




229 


Schullian, Brian 




224 


Sherman, Boris 


407 


Sands, Kyle 




238 


Schulrz, Barret 




246 


Sherman, Clare 


239 


Sands, Louis 




20 


Schultz, Justin 




200 


Sherman, Lauren 


261 


Sands, S. 


249 


260 


Schultz, Kerri 


338 


407 


Sherman, Patrick 


407 


ianford, S. 




257 


Schultz, Mindy 


245 


334 


Sherman, Russell 


303 


sansone, N. 




249 


Schultz, T. 




257 


Sherrin, Scort 


331 


iant, Frederick 




406 


Schumacher, Judy 




255 


Sherry, Scott 


291 


iantello, C. 




259 


Schumaker, Jason 




407 


Sherwood, Kate 


326 


ianten, Victor Van 




329 


Schurte, Brent 




266 


Sheth, Amit 


321,407 


Santiago, Margaret 




406 


Schwan, Jay 




241 


Sheth, Sameeta 


339, 353, 407 


iantoro, Daniella 


250, 388 


Schwarrz, Amy 




239 


Shibla, William 


345 


Santos, Sybil 




406 


Schwartz, Debbie 




203 


Shim, Chuck 


299 


Japa, Lori 




279 


Schwartz, Erin 




239 


Shin, Jae 


407 


Sapires, David 




293 


Schwartz, Gina 




250 


Shin, Jaimii 


285 


iarkiss, B. 




260 


Schwartz, Jay 




407 


Shin, Joe 


299 


Jatterthwaite, Tod 




98 


Schwartz, Jennifer 




407 


Shin, Nick 


287 


iattherthwaite, Paul 




52 


Schwartz, Ramona 




407 


Shin, Yeng 


41 


jaunders, Chris 


195 


214 


Schwarzbrott, Brian 




280 


Shinsky, Jody 


239 


Jaunders, Laura 




239 


Schwechter, Brandy 




239 


Shipe, Damon 


313 


Jaunders, Stephen 




406 


Schwede, Josh 




280 


Shipman, A. 


273 


javarino, Maggie 


245 


300 


Schweitzer, Christi 




255 


Shipman, E. 


273 


awalha, M. 




260 


Schweitzer, Jennifer 




407 


Shissler, Andy 


237 


awyer, A. 




259 


Scibienski, Mike 




297 


Shoech, Amy 


321 


awyer, Doug 


212 


246 


Scigousky, Brooke 




310 


Shoemaker, K. 


244 


axor, Allan 




332 


Scoriggine, Andy 




69 


Shoffner, Goerge 


59 


cales, Jason 




299 


Scort, E. 




249 


Shorr, Ian 


285 


carlett, Richard 




406 


Scott, Michelle 




261 


Shorr, Srephanie 


407 


celsi, Mike 




302 


Scouten, Eric 




415 


Showers, Mike 


284 


chaab. Shannon 


236, 406 


Scoville, Ryan 




246 


Shredder, Darren 


302 


chaberg, Tim 




243 


Scroggins, Andy 




335 


Shrof, Derek 


238 


chachter, Marianne 




239 


Seaman, K. 




269 


Shu, Jennifer 


229 


chad, L. 




258 


Sears, Chris 




332 


Shukas, C. 


273 


chaefer, J. 




249 


Searon, Eleanor 




407 


Shukas, Tom 


284 


chaeffer, Steve 




92 


Sebasrian, Julie 




407 


Shulman, Leslie 


261 


chafer, A. 




259 


Seehawer, Jeannine 




407 


Shuman, Paul 


280 


chaff, Amy 




261 


Seeley, Jennifer 




407 


Shupack, Dan 


291 


chaffer, Cari 




285 


Seelow, Leslie 




255 


Shurman, Kim 


250 


chaffner, Jodi 




340 


Segebart, Bryan 




333 


Siblik, Daniel 


407 


chalanski, Ernie 




293 


Seguin, John 




267 


Sica, Andrea 


236, 407 


charl, Susanne 




407 


Sehstedt, Melissa 




271 


Sideris, Alison 


130, 131 


chartz, Liz 




239 


Sehy, M. 




263 


Sidle, Douglas 


407 


chawb, Jenny 




271 


Sehy, Stephen 




407 


Sieban, Meredith 


285 


cheeler, Karen 




250 


Seibold, John 




267 


Siebert, Eric 


179 


chein, Howard 




137 


Seidman, Jesse 




299 


Siebert, Greg 


285 


chell, Jeanne 




367 


Seifert, Brian 




407 


Siebert, Scott 


285 


chemerhorn, B. 




328 


Seiler, Amy 




407 


Sieffert, Maggie 


326, 327 


chemerhorn, Stephen 




407 


Seiler, Linda 


279, 4C 


Sieh, David 


407 


chenk, Rebecca 




236 


Seilheimer, L. 




249 


Sienko, C. 


257 


chennum, Angie 




21 


Seitzinger, Douglas 




407 


Sierens, Gary 


253 


cher, Niclas 




322 


Seiwert, M. 




273 


Siglund, Brett 


299 


cherer, Debbie 




279 


Selinger, Tal 




239 


Signorella, Tony 


34,35 


cherer, Jennifer 


339, 407 


Selkow, Serh 




302 


Sihwail, Rana 


285 


cherer, Jenny 




279 


Sellenberg, A. 




245 


Sikich, Jennifer 


351 


cherer, Karl 




238 


Sellman, Chad 




280 


Sikorski, Laura 


249 


cherer, Mark 




303 


Selvagio, Nina 




236 


Sikovski, Laura 


421 


chidt, D. 




258 


SennefT, Jen 




342 


Sikula, Drew 


280 


chieber, Lani 




407 


Sentman, Karen 




271 


Silagyi, Gayle 


307, 339 


chieffer, S. 




259 


Sepp, Bradley 




407 


Silber, Hillary 


239 


chiesser, Jay 




293 


Septon, Brian 




280 


Silcox, Jason 


326 


chifTerdecker, B. 




257 


Sergio, C. 




273 


Silivay, Elise 


250 


chiller, Jodi 




236 


Serlin, Jodie 




239 


Sill, Christophet 


407 


chilling, Rachel 


259 


346 


Serritella, J. 




273 


Siller, C. 


244 


chilling, Sarah 259,316,339,407 


Setlak, B. 




260 


Silva, Maria 


59 


chimmel, Kim 230 


294, 295 


Seuring, Wendy 




407 


Silva, Rosa 


271,407 


chirer, Jeremy 




281 


Sfondilis, George 




285 


Silver, L. 


263 


chlaffer, H. 




244 


Shackelford, Chris 




407 


Sim, Susan 


265 


chlarb, M. 




260 


Shader, Julianne 




340 


Simek, Cari 


323 


chlesinger, Mylynda 


265, 407 


Shah, Ami 




340 


Simmers, Karherine 


250 


chlipf. Sheila 


255, 407 


Shah, Anil 




241 


Simmer, Dan 


252 


chlossberg, Jon 




246 


Shah.Jigar 




326 


Simmons, Donald 


407 


chlueter, Mike 




284 


Shah, Kalpesh 


340, 407 


Simmons, Jennifer 


257, 407 


chlueter, Pamela 




407 


Shah, Manso S. 




242 


Simmons, Krisca 


236, 407 


chmalz, Ronda 279,311 


328 


407 


Shah, Mona 


279 


407 


Simms, Daniel 


322,407,415 


chmeink, Ellen 




407 


Shah, Parul 




239 


Simnett, K. 


244 


chmelebeck, Cheryl 




236 


Shah, Swati 




321 


Simon, Bryan 


407 


chmidt, Eric 281 


314,407 


Shaheen, Meredith 


244 


407 


Simon, Delinda 


410 


chmidt, Karen 




407 


Shames, Michelle 


239 


340 


Simon, Glenn 


280 


chmidt, Kimberly 




407 


Shanahan, Mary P. 




242 


Simon, Heather 


344 


chmidt, L. 




273 


Shandling, Alissa 




261 


Simon, Matt 


290 


chmidt, Lindsay Horig 




289 


Shane, Mike 




253 


Simon, Stephanie 


239,410 


chmidt, Liz 




279 


Shannon, Ed 




284 


Simons, Krista 


410 


chmitt, Brad 




407 


Shannon, Mike 




306 


Simpson, K. 


259 


chmitt, Jennifer 


265 


407 


Shapiro, Alison 


261 


320 


Simpson, Tyler 


243 


chmitt, Kim 




285 


Shapiro, Scott 




280 


Sims, Craig 


253, 350 


chmitt, Mark 


326, 32 


Shaples, Jamie 




297 


Sims, Denise 


410 


:hmitt. Matt 




246 


Shariff, Miraj 




407 


Sims, Maria 


271 


zhmitz, Ann 




250 


Shaufeld, Brian 




340 


Sims, Mike 


252 


ihnabel, Tanya 




407 


Shaver, Courtney 




236 


Sims, Scott 


324, 325 


; :hnable, Ingrid 


336 


337 


Shaw, Carli 




321 


Sinak, J. 


244 


:hneider, Allison 




265 


Shaw, Joli 


250, 407 


Sinak, Thomas 


224, 410 


:hneider, Matt 




284 


Shaya, Paul 


299, 407 


Sinclair, G. 


245 


[:hnobel, K. 




259 


Shea, K. 




257 


Singer, Allison 


239 


| :hoeffmann, Jennifer 


281 


407 


Shea, Kevin 




280 


Singer, Matt 


284 


|:hoen, Jacy 




419 


Shea, Timmy 




41 


Singer, Missy 


261 


hhoeneberg, B. 




258 


Sheckler, M. 




249 


Singh, George 


353 


t'hoener, Sara 




341 


Sheehy, Catherine 




407 


Singley, M. 


259 


I hoeninger, Julie 




236 


Sheehy, K. 




273 


Sipe, Carol 


410 


1 holfield, Jim 




266 


Sheils, Shannon 


285 


340 


Sipes, Dallas 


46, 47, 245 


I honhoff, Jeff 




266 


Shein, Doug 




212 


Sipes, S. 


245 


| hott, Reich 




237 


Shekhtman, Regina 




261 


Siromaskul, Smith 


299 


| hrieffer, Paige 




279 


Shelby, Michael 


340 


407 


Sison, Charlene 


250 


[hrimpf, Matthew 


251 


407 


Shepard, Deborah 


345 


407 


Sisul, Jerry 


252 



December 6 

A serial rapist was put to death in Texas by 
lethal injection for murdering a victim's boyfriend. 

December 7 

The Indian Ocean was linked to the hurricane El 
Nino's behavior in the Pacific Ocean. This produced 
the possibility to predict the monsoons. 

December 8 

Service Fee Advisory Committee denied a re- 
quest for a 4.5 percent budget increase for McKinley 
Health Center. 

December 9 

A $20,000 grant from the Kellogg Foundation 
will allow 50 student leaders to attend a leadership 
retreat for about half of the cost. The three other 
universities that will share this grant are Purdue 
University in West Lafayette, Ind., Massachusettes 
Institute of Technology and Georgia Institute of 
Technology in Atlanta, Ga. 

December 13 

Deborah Helregel was found guilty of first 
degree murder. Her husband was found shot to 
death in their Pesotum home on January 17, 1994. 

December 27 

A fire at the north cooling tower of Covenant 
Medical Center caused the building to be tempo- 
rarily evacuated of patients and staff. The fire 
was quickly put out by Urbana and University of 
Illinois firefighters. 



January 1995 



January 4 




Republicans took control of both houses in 
Congress for the first time in 40 years. Their pro- 
posed goal of the 104th Congress, outlined in the 
Contract with America, was to try to reduce the role 



Index/Timeline 449 



'■■■■ 
mm 



A YEAR OF 




January 1995 



of the government in American life. Some of the 
major provisions of this contract included the 
Personal Responsibility Act, the Family Preservation 
Act and the Balanced Budget Amendment. Newt 
Gingrich, a Republican from Georgia and the new 
Speaker of the House, and Robert Dole, a Republi- 
can from Kansas and Senate Majority Leader, spear- 
headed this campaign. 

January 10 

South Africa's racially segregated state school 
system ended with the start of the new school year. 
Black and white children attended school together 
for the first time after the downfall of Apartheid. 

January 12 

Qubilah Bahiyah Shabazz, 34, was arrested on 
federal charges of hiring a hit man to kill her father's 
rival Louis Farrakhan, minister of the Nation of 
Islam. Farrakhan was suspected of having plotted 
the assassination of Shabazz' father, Malcolm X. 

A major Pacific storm drenched California and 
caused more than $300 million in damage across the 
state. The floods caused the deaths of at least 11 people. 

January 13 

The Pope began an 11 -day tour of Manila, 
Papua New Guinea, Australia and Sri Lanka. This trip 
marked his first extended foray in 16 months after a 
previous illness. 

Janaury 17 




An earthquake struck Kobe, the sixth largest 
city in Japan. With a Richter scale reading of 7.5, this 
was the worst earthquake to hit an urban area of 
Japan since the Tokyo earthquake of 1923- The 
quake tore through several western cities, toppling 



450 Index/Timeline 



Sin, C. 




249 


Speer, Ryan 


284 


Stevenson, A. 


2Sx 


Sitz, Julie 




343 


Spelker, Aaron 


281 


Stevenson, Andy 


2')l 


Siweck, Brett 




325 


Sperle, Carolyn 


239 


Stevenson, Diane 


543 


Sjoblom, Melissa 




341 


Sperry, Jonathan 


333 


Stevenson, Jay 


543 


Sjoholm, T. 




273 


Speyer, Mark 


251 


Stevenson, Joel 


333| 


Skaggs.J.D. 




285 


Spiegel, Matt 


280 


Stevenson, M. 


24i 


Skelly, David 


260,410 


Spieketmann, Kimbetly 


273, 410 


Stewart, Kirsten 


4l 1 


Skinner, Jeffrey 


328 


410 


Spiggos, John 


304 


Stewarr, Nathania 


41 1 


Skinner, Tom 




297 


Spilotro, Paul 


246, 345 


Stewart, Sarah 


271,41lj 


Sklenicka, Amy 




236 


Spindler, Michelle 


410 


Stiff, Jason 


266 


Skodol, Julie 


258 


410 


Spire, Jen 


335 


Stillman, Aaron 


503 


Skowron, Eric 




340 


Spirzner, Erik 


299 


Stinner, Michelle 


-ill 


Sladek, Ember 




344 


Spizzirri, Pete 


284 


Stinton, David 


312,41lj 


Slansky, B. 




244 


Spoht, Kata 


236 


Stirniman, Tracy 


260, 279: 


Slazinik, Ed 




333 


Spoonamofc, Beth 


17 


Stockton, Richard 


310,326! 


Sliva, Becky 


114 


236 


Spotny, Katen 


410 


Stoecklin, Rhonda 


411 


Sloan, I. 




249 


Sprague. Chad 


253 


Stoffel, Dan 


533 


Slomski, Dina 


216,217 


410 


Sprague, Rob 


246 


Stokes, Kathryn 255,310,316,320 


Slonski, Stephanie 




410 


Sprague, Todd 


410 


Stokes, Mike 


299 


Slowik, Jean 




37 


Spraque, Andrew 


316 


Stokes, Renee 


255 


Slutzky, Mancy 




239 


Sprecher, Dan 


253 


Stokes, Sophie 


285 


Smart, Missy 




250 


Sprechman, Sandi 


261 


Stolfi, James 


411 


Smeltzet, Molly 




323 


Springer, Joe 


253 


Stoller, Jill 


341 


Smetana, Kathy 


258 


410 


Springer, Sally 


255 


Stolman, Keren 


239 


Smiadris, Mike 




214 


Sproul, Timothy 


410 


Stolpa, Amy 


245,411 


Smiley, Jill 




239 


Spychalski, Steve 


243 


Stoltz, S. 


247 


Smilgius, Sandy 




250 


Squires, Kelley 


281,344 


Stone, Kevin 


340, 41 1 


Smith, A. 


273 


328 


St. Mattin, Dan 


280 


Stone, Matthew 


-ill 


Smith, Aimee 


174 


176 


St. Martin, Michael 


280,410 


Stone, Michelle 


411 


Smith, Andrea 




410 


St.Clair, Yolanda 


410 


Stone, Steve 


241 


Smith, Brian 




410 


Stacey, D. 


259 


Stone, Tara 


259 


Smith, CJ. 




281 


Stach, S. 


257 


Stone, Todd 


505 


Smith, Corrina 




271 


Stachowiak, Dave 


302 


Stone, V. 


257 


Smith, Dan 


237 


246 


Stack, Nicole 


236 


Stoner, Kent 


299 


Smith, Dwayne 


10 


410 


Stack, Ronald 


410 


Stopek, Sara 


239 


Smith, Gary 




10 


Stadler, Darci 


265 


Stopka, Joel 


241,340 


Smith, J. 




257 


Staffeldt, Michael 


410 


Storaasli, Mikkel 


(,( 


Smith, Jason 




253 


Stagg, Ryan 


246 


Srorbakken, Shawn 


310 


Smith, Jeff 




241 


Staggs, Sherry 


410 


Store, Dave 


299 


Smith, Jenny 




239 


Stagle, Kristen 


265 


Storm, Lisa 


255 


Smith, Julie 


279 


340 


Stake, Kimberly 


269,410 


Stover, Lauri 


521 


Smith, Kenneth 




410 


Sraley, K. 


258 


Strackany, Justin 


333, 347 


Smith, Lori A. 




242 


Stamm, Kelly 


265 


Strackman, Jonathan 


411 


Smith, Marshall 




410 


Stanczyk, Jason 


243 


Stran, Margaret 


43 


Smith, Melissa 




410 


Stanek, Robett 


421 


Srrandberg, Julie 


411 


Smith, Missy 




323 


Stang, Holly 


410 


Strang, Karyn 


279 


Smith, Pamela 




410 


Stanich, Anthony 


410 


Stranski, Laura 


341 


Smith, Paula 


208 


317 


Stanke, Chuck 


243 


Straub, Liz 


285 


Smith, Ryan 




312 


Stanley, B. 


244 


Straub, Tim 


411 


Smith, Sarah 


236,410 


Stanley, Kim 


340 


Strauss. Jen 


239 


Smith, Shannon 




183 


Stanley, M. 


260 


Straza, Jamie 


299 


Smith, Stephanie 




410 


Stanton, Kristin 


410 


Stregulz, Kim 


279. 


Smith, Stephen 




410 


Star, Rhett 


302 


Streidel, Mark 


411 


Smith, Steve 




344 


Staraitis, Julie 


410 


Streit, Pete 


231' 


Smith, T. 




244 


Stare, Mike 


304 


Strode, Julie 


9" 


Smith, Tanesha 




410 


Statk, Jonarhan 


107 


Strode, Rachel 


255 


Smith, Tierney 




388 


Stark, Rob 


246 


Srrohman, Kathryn 


4,1 


Smith, Tina 




410 


Starkey, Colleen 


236, 328 


Strolovirz. Stacey 


229 


Smithson, Katie 




285 


Starkman, Kara 


236 


Strothof, S. 


24" 


Smodtick, Ken 




20 


Starr, A. 


247 


Strougal, John 


76 


Smolinski, M. 




259 


Starr, Tammy 


410 


Strunk, Colleen 


54 1 


Smorynski. Jeff 




284 


Stasiak, Dana 


410 


Sttunk, Dawn 


541 


Smudrick, S. 




249 


Statland, Emily 


411 


Struznik, Mark 


411 


Smull, Julie 


269, 339 


410 


Stauffachet, Jessica 


257 


Strzelinski, Rachel 


250 


Smutny, Susan 




410 


Stauss, Julie 


279 


Stuart, Mike 


251 


Smyth, Sean 


69, 349, 410 


Stavish, Scott 


411 


Stubbe, Michael 


284,4ll,| 


Sneddon, H. 




259 


Stawarz, Ryan 


284 


Stubbs, Anita 


296 41 1 : 


Snedon, Kristin 




279 


Stawarz, Scott 


284 


Srudinski, Alicia 


26: 


Sneyders, M. 




260 


Stearnes, Jeffrey 


411 


Stuedle, Staci 


236,339.411 


Snipe, Simone 




410 


Stearney, C. 


273 


Stummet, Cara 


259.411 


Slum Kit 




285 


Steams, Clint 


411 


Stump. Andy 


20" 


Snow, John 




410 


Stec, N. 


247 


Stump, Jana 


43. 24') 


Snow, Steve 




285 


Steckel, Sandra 


411 


Stumper, K. 


249 


Snyder, David 




410 


Stefanski, Joe 


291 


Sturgell, Suzanne 


411 


Snyder, Jenny 




321 


Steffes, Mike 


302 


Stutz, Cindy 


236 


Socmmel, Emily 




410 


Steffgen, Jennifer 


38,411 


Sruzin, Dan 


411 


Soer, Angie 




213 


Stegen. Matt 


299 


Styrczula, Donna 


4ll 


Sogge, Noell 




236 


Stehman. J. 


245 


Su, Kenneth 


219,411 


Solan, E. 




249 


Stein, A. 


263 


Suancatek, Meridith 


411 


Soloff, Joy 




280 


Stein. R. 


247 


Suatez, Mike 


16.5 


Solon, Mart 




291 


Stein, S. 


249 


Subbiah. Jeevan 


251,339 


Soltesz, Monica 


250,314,410 


Steinbetg. Anat 


261 


Subbiah, Rae 


81 


Soltys, Scott 




410 


Steinbetg. Anna 


261 


Subbiah. Rehka 


256 


Somerville, Kimberly 


271,340,410 


Steinberg, Ralph 


290 


Subotich, Sandra 


285 


Sonenberg, Zoe 




239 


Steinet, Heather 


329 


Suckow, S. 


260 


Sons, Jeff 




280 


Steiner. Rachel 


411 


Suddduth, Michael 


411 


Soong, Tony 




299 


Steinhaus, Stephen 


411 


Sudduth, Matt 


286 


Soot, Kaarin 




410 


Steinkamp, D. 


245 


Sudduth, Michael 


297 


Soot, Marika 




279 


Stembridge, Katie 


95, 245 


Suedmevet. Beth 


411 


Sopha, Bounsanong 




410 


Stengel, L. 


245 


Sugent. Kristen 


244 411 


Sopiarz, C. 




260 


Stennet, S. 


245 


Sula, Tim 


303 


Sorenson, Heath 




410 


Stennett, Cheri 


411 


Sulgit, Michelle 


411 


Sorenson, Keith 




410 


Stephan, Ryan 


266 


Sulkson, Christopher 


411 


Sorkin, Harley 




285 


Stephansen, Kristen 


285,411 


Sullivan, Bill 


251 


Soroghan, T. 




244 


Srephens, Darxavia 


411 


Sullivan, Dan 


246 


Sorquist. Chris 


230 


321 


Stephens, J. 


247 


Sullivan, David 


411 


Soshnik, Jenny 




239 


Stephens, Jason 


299 


Sullivan, E. 


2"3 


Sosnowski, Chris 




410 


Stephens, Nick 


327 


Sullivan, Heather 


2-5,411 


Sours, Katherine 


273 


410 


Stepping, Mary 


411 


Sullivan, Jeremy 


1S6 


Southerland, Kari 


245,410 


Stepping, Phil 


335 


Sullivan, Kathy 


236 


Spalding, A. 




269 


Sterbenc. Jeff 


280 


Sullivan, Laura 


411 


Spangler, John 




410 


Stem, Jennifer 


337 


Sullivan, M. 


2*3.328 ; 


Spataro, Dina 


263, 410 


Stemhell, Paul 


302 


Sullivan. Mart 


304 


Speaker, Jennifer 




410 


Stetnshein, Erica 


239 


Sullivan, Megan 


411 


Speakman, Christine 




410 


Sterrett, Molly P. 


242 


Sullivan. Michael 


299 | 


Spear, Gary 




59 


Stetina, A. J. 


411 


Sullivan, S. 


244 U 


Spears, John 




63 


Stettin, Megan 


166 


Sullyman. Dirilten 


246 || 


Spears, Steve 




282 


Stevens, M. 


328 


Sulzberger, Brent 


253 1 


Speck, Mary L. 




242 


Stevens, Michael 


241,411 


Summer, N. 


2731 


Speckmann, Kimberly 285 


410 


Stevens, Tyler 


333 


Summers, Craig 


411 



Summers, Julia 


23C 


.411 


Terson, Jake 




290 


Troesken, B. 


263 


Summers, Kriscina 




236 


Terstriep, K. 




259 


Troiani. L. 


273 


Summcrville, London 


25S 


,338 


Terzian, Ellen 




30 


Trojan, Cheryl 


413 


Sun, Richard 




411 


Tesdall, Abigail 


258 


,413 


Trottier, A. 


249 


Sundaram, Manoshree 




411 


Tesdall, K. 




258 


Trubiano, Steve 


267 


Sundquist, Erik 




305 


Tessler, Greg 


40,41 


Truckenbrod, A. 


259 


Sundquist, Scon 




411 


Tevelow, Amos 




382 


Truckenbrod, Brandy 


413 


Sundquist, V. 




244 


Thai, Matt 




297 


True, Jeffrey 


413 


Supalo, S. 




247 


Tharp, Jeena 


269 


,413 


Truong, Tung 


413 


Supan, J. 




257 


Theims, Christy 




281 


Truty, E. 


245 


Suroff, Jill 




239 


Theobald, Jill 




413 


Tryba, K. 


273 


Sury, Doug 




280 


Theodorakis, Athena 


310 


,322 


Tryggestad, Lucas 


303 


Susin, Dominic 


266 


,350 


Theodos, T. 




258 


Tsai, Jehan 


326 


Sutherland, Eric 




284 


Therian, Brian 




285 


Tschetter, Tara 


285,413 


Surhers, Laurie 




279 


Thiede, Brian 




266 


Tschniak, Daniel 


413 


Sutis, Mike 




284 


Thiede, Jeff 




266 


Tse, Elaine 


413 


Suror, Jennifer 




340 


Thieme, Dave 




251 


Tse, Kai 


311,413 


Sutor, Susan 


279,411 


Thomas, Brian 




280 


Tseng, Albert 


327 


Sutter, Jeremy 




198 


Thomas, Geoffrey 


267,413 


Tseng, Tony 


413 


Sutter, Tom 


237 


,288 


Thomas, Julienne 




413 


Tsirulik, Anna 


340 


Sum, Lisa 




335 


Thomas, Kathleen 




336 


Tsou, Min-Hsin 


413 


Svedja, Scot 




291 


Thomas, Matt 




343 


Tsugawa, Michael 


414 


Svenson, S. 




249 


Thomas, William 




413 


Tsuge, Naotaka 


414 


Svetlic, Michelle I. 




242 


Thompson, Amanda 




413 


Tuchsherer, Rob 


266 


Svetlik, Christopher 




411 


Thompson, Andy 


224 


,225 


Tucker, Jill 


345,414 


Svoboda, Linda 




411 


Thompson, C. 




247 


Tucker, Joe 


117,297 


Swann, L. 




259 


Thompson, Desiree 




182 


Tufano, A. 


269 


Swanson, Jason 




291 


Thompson, E. 




249 


Tufts, Kristin 


281 


Swanson, Michelle 250 


,338 


,411 


Thompson, Jeff 


243 


,322 


Tulley, C. 


257 


Swanson, Ned 




291 


Thompson, Kim 




257 


Tunelius, Tyra 


414 


Swartz, James 




411 


Thompson, Laurel 


269 


,413 


Tunstal, Dave 


246 


Swartzfager, Christina 




279 


Thompson, Mike 


266 


267 


Tuntland, John 


350 


Swedo, Greg 




243 


Thompson, Sasha 


310,316 


341 


Turacek, Heidi 


285 


Sweeney, Michael 




411 


Thompson, Stacy 




281 


Turek, Bonnie 


261 


Sweet, Leslie